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Military Health System

Studies

On this page you can find various studies developed by Military Health System. Please scroll down or use the search box to find specific studies.

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Frequent binge drinking after combat-acquired traumatic brain injury among active duty military personnel with a past year combat deployment.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether combat-acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with postdeployment frequent binge drinking among a random sample of active duty military personnel. PARTICIPANTS: Active duty military personnel who returned home within the past year from deployment to a combat theater of operations and completed a survey health assessment (N = 7155). METHODS: Cross-sectional observational study with multivariate analysis of responses to the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel, an anonymous, random, population-based assessment of the armed forces. MAIN MEASURES: Frequent binge drinking: 5 or more drinks on the same occasion, at least once per week, in the past 30 days. TBI-AC: self-reported altered consciousness only; loss of consciousness (LOC) of less than 1 minute (TBI-LOC <1); and LOC of 1 minute or greater (TBI-LOC 1+) after combat injury event exposure. RESULTS: Of active duty military personnel who had a past year combat deployment, 25.6% were frequent binge drinkers and 13.9% reported experiencing a TBI on the deployment, primarily TBI-AC (7.5%). In regression models adjusting for demographics and positive screen for posttraumatic stress disorder, active duty military personnel with TBI had increased odds of frequent binge drinking compared with those with no injury exposure or without TBI: TBI-AC (adjusted odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.84); TBI-LOC 1+ (adjusted odds ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.79). CONCLUSIONS: Traumatic brain injury was significantly associated with past month frequent binge drinking after controlling for posttraumatic stress disorder, combat exposure, and other covariates.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federal government department, agency, or organization, other than the Department of Defense
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2012
  • Citation: Adams RS, Larson MJ, Corrigan JD, Horgan CM, Williams TV. Frequent binge drinking after combat-acquired traumatic brain injury among active duty military personnel with a past year combat deployment. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):349-60.

Diagnostic Utility of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist for Identifying Full and Partial PTSD in Active-Duty Military.

Study

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine optimally efficient cutoff scores on the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL) for identifying full posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and partial PTSD (P-PTSD) in active-duty Marines and Sailors. Participants were 1,016 Marines and Sailors who were administered the PCL and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) 3 months after returning from Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. PCL cutoffs were tested against three CAPS-based classifications: full PTSD, stringent P-PTSD, and lenient P-PTSD. A PCL score of 39 was found to be optimally efficient for identifying full PTSD. Scores of 38 and 33 were found to be optimally efficient for identifying stringent and lenient P-PTSD, respectively. Findings suggest that the PCL cutoff that is optimally efficient for detecting PTSD in active-duty Marines and Sailors is substantially lower than the score of 50 commonly used by researchers. In addition, findings provide scores useful for identifying P-PTSD in returning service members.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2014
  • Citation: Dickstein BD, Weathers FW, Angkaw AC, Nievergelt CM, Yurgil K, Nash WP, et.al. . Diagnostic Utility of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Checklist for Identifying Full and Partial PTSD in Active-Duty Military. Assessment. 2014 Sep 1.

Providing care to military personnel and their families: how we can all contribute.

Study

Abstract

Providing medical care to members of the military and their families remains a societal duty carried out not only by military physicians but also, and in large part, by civilian providers. As many military families are geographically dispersed, it is probable that all physicians at some point in their training or careers will care for this unique patient population. Understanding the military culture can help physicians provide the best care possible to our military families, and inclusion of military cultural competency curricula in all medical schools is a first step in advancing this understanding. The authors review the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that all health professionals should acquire to be able to care for those who serve and offer recommendations for developing these among all students and trainees.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2014
  • Citation: Gleeson TD, Hemmer PA. Providing care to military personnel and their families: how we can all contribute. Acad Med. 2014 Sep;89(9):1201-3.

Prevalence, health care utilization, and costs of fibromyalgia, irritable bowel, and chronic fatigue syndromes in the military health system, 2006-2010.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We compared prevalence, health care utilization, and costs over time for nonelderly adults diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in relation to timing of federal approvals for FMS drugs. DATA SOURCE: We used military health care claims from October 2006 to September 2010. STUDY DESIGN/ANALYSIS: Retrospective, multiple-year comparisons were conducted using trend analyses, and time series regression-based generalized linear models. RESULTS: Over 5 years, FMS prevalence rates increased from 0.307% to 0.522%, whereas IBS and CFS prevalence rates remained stable. The largest increase in FMS prevalence occurred between 2007 and 2008. Health care utilization was higher for FMS cases compared to IBS and CFS cases. Over 5 years, the total cost for FMS-related care increased $163.2 million, whereas IBS costs increased $14.9 million and CFS cost increased $3.7 million. Between 2006 and 2010, total pharmacy cost for FMS cases increased from $55 million ($3,641/person) to $96.3 million ($3,557/person). CONCLUSION: Although cause and effect cannot be established, the advent of federally approved drugs for FMS in concert with pharmaceutical industry marketing of these drugs coincide with the observed changes in prevalence, health care utilization, and costs of FMS relative to IBS and CFS.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2014
  • Citation: Jeffery DD, Bulathsinhala L, Kroc M, Dorris J. Prevalence, health care utilization, and costs of fibromyalgia, irritable bowel, and chronic fatigue syndromes in the military health system, 2006-2010. Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1021-9.

Day of injury cognitive performance on the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) by U.S. military service members in OEF/OIF.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The study investigated the clinical validity of the cognitive screening component of the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) for the evaluation of acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in a military operational setting. METHODS: This was a retrospective data study involving analysis of MACE data on Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom deployed service members with mTBI. In total, 179 cases were included in analyses based on ICD-9 diagnostic codes and characteristics of mTBI, and availability of MACE data on day of injury. MACE data from the mTBI group was compared to a military sample without mTBI administered the MACE as part of a normative data project. RESULTS: On day of injury, the mTBI group performed worse than controls on the MACE cognitive test (d = 0.90), with significant impairments in all cognitive domains assessed. MACE cognitive score was strongly associated with established indicators of acute injury severity. Lower MACE cognitive performance on day of injury was predictive of lengthier postinjury recovery time and time until return to duty after mTBI. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the current study support the use of the MACE as a valid screening tool to assess for cognitive dysfunction in military service members during the acute phase after mTBI.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2014
  • Citation: McCrea M, Guskiewicz K, Doncevic S, Helmick K, Kennedy J, Boyd C, et.al., . Day of injury cognitive performance on the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) by U.S. military service members in OEF/OIF. Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):990-7.

The association of percentage energy from fat and colon cancer risk among members of the US military.

Study

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have previously reported an association between high fat intake and colon cancer risk. However, findings have generally been inconclusive. This study aimed to investigate the association between fat as a percentage of energy intake and colon cancer risk. Study subjects included 215 cases and 215 matched controls identified by the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Percentage energy from fat (Pfat) was estimated using a short dietary screener developed by the National Cancer Institute for two time periods: the year before the first blood draw and the year before colon cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between colon cancer risk and Pfat. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Compared with the lowest quartile of Pfat, the adjusted odds of having colon cancer were 2.00 (95% CI 0.96-4.18), 2.83 (95% CI 1.41-5.66), and 3.37 (95% CI 1.58-7.17), respectively, for the second, third, and highest quartiles in the year before cancer diagnosis. Similar results were observed for Pfat at an earlier time point. Our findings suggest a positive association between Pfat and colon cancer in the US military population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Shao S, Kao TC, Eckhaus J, Bourgeois J, Perera K, Zhu K. The association of percentage energy from fat and colon cancer risk among members of the US military. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2014 Jul 29.

Associations between mental health disorders and body mass index among military personnel.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if overweight or obesity is associated with mental health disorder (MHD) symptoms among military personnel Methods: Secondary analysis using the 2005 Department of Defense Health Related Behaviors Survey (N = 15,195). Standard Body Mass Index (BMI) categories were used to classify participants' body composition. RESULTS: For women, obesity was associated with symptoms of serious psychological distress (SPD), post-traumatic stress disorder, and depression. For men, obesity and overweight was associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and SPD, respectively. Self-reported high personal stress was the strongest predictor of MHD symptoms and suicide attempts. CONCLUSION: Self-reported stress was a stronger predictor of MHD symptoms than BMI. There is potential value in screening personnel for personal stress as a MHD risk factor.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Smith TJ, White A, Hadden L, Young AJ, Marriott BP. Associations between mental health disorders and body mass index among military personnel. Am J Health Behav. 2014 Jul;38(4):529-40.

Trends in rates of chronic obstructive respiratory conditions among US militarypersonnel, 2001-2013.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The US military has been continuously engaged in combat operations since 2001. Assessing trends in respiratory health diagnoses during this time of prolonged military conflict can provide insight into associated changes in the burden of pulmonary conditions in the US military population. PURPOSE: To estimate and evaluate trends in rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases in the active duty US military population from 2001 through 2013. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of ambulatory medical encounter diagnosis data corresponding to a study base of over 18 million personnel-years was performed to estimate average rates and evaluate temporal trends in rates of chronic obstructive lung conditions. Differences in rates and the time trends of those rates were evaluated by branch of military service, military occupation, and military rank. RESULTS: During the 13-year period, we observed 482,670 encounters for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and allied conditions (ICD-9 490-496) among active duty military personnel. Over half (57%) of the medical encounters in this category were for a diagnosis of bronchitis, not specified as acute or chronic. There was a statistically significant 17.2% average increase in the annual rates of this nonspecific bronchitis diagnosis from 2001-2009 (95% CI: 13.5% to 21.1%), followed by a 23.6% annual decline in the rates from 2009 through 2013 (95% CI: 8.6% to 36.2%). Statistically significant declines were observed in the rates of chronic bronchitis over time (annual percentage decline: 3.1%; 95% CI: 0.5% to 6.6%) and asthma (annual percentage decline: 5.9%; 95% CI: 2.5% to 9.2%). A 1.6% annual increase in the rate of emphysema and a 0.1% increase in the rate of chronic airways obstruction (not elsewhere classified) over the study period were not statistically significant (P>.05). The magnitude of the estimated rates of these chronic obstructive lung conditions, and, to a lesser extent, the temporal trends in these rates, were sensitive to the requirement that there be persistence of the diagnosis evidenced in the medical record in order qualify as an incident case.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office: US Army Public Health Command
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Abraham JH, Clark LL, Sharkey JM, Baird CP. Trends in rates of chronic obstructive respiratory conditions among US military personnel, 2001-2013. US Army Med Dep J. 2014 Jul-Sep:33-43.

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military Volume 1. Design of the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

Study

Abstract

In early 2014, the Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military — an assessment last conducted in 2012 by the department itself with its Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel. This volume documents the methodology used in the resulting RAND Military Workplace Study, which invited close to 560,000 service members to participate in a survey fielded in August and September of 2014. It describes the survey methods, how the new questionnaire was designed, and how sampling, recruitment, and analytic weighting were pursued. It also includes the entire survey instrument.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office: National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federally Funded Research and Development Center
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Rand Corporation, National Defense Research Institute

The Experience, Expression, and Control of Anger Following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Military Sample.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the experience and expression of anger in a military sample. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 661 military personnel with a history of TBI and 1204 military personnel with no history of TBI. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, between-group design, using multivariate analysis of variance. MAIN MEASURE: State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 (STAXI-2). RESULTS: Participants with a history of TBI had higher scores on the STAXI-2 than controls and were 2 to 3 times more likely than the participants in the control group to have at least 1 clinically significant elevation on the STAXI-2. Results suggested that greater time since injury (ie, months between TBI and assessment) was associated with lower scores on the STAXI-2 State Anger scale. CONCLUSION: Although the results do not take into account confounding psychiatric conditions and cannot address causality, they suggest that a history of TBI increases the risk of problems with the experience, expression, and control of anger. This bolsters the need for proper assessment of anger when evaluating TBI in a military cohort.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2014
  • Citation: Bailie JM, Cole WR, Ivins B, Boyd C, Lewis S, Neff J, Schwab K. The Experience, Expression, and Control of Anger Following Traumatic Brain Injury in a Military Sample. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2014 Feb 28.

Outcomes after bankart repair in a military population: predictors for surgical revision and long-term disability.

Study

Abstract

PURPOSE: To quantify the rate of surgical failure after anterior shoulder stabilization procedures, as well as to identify demographic and surgical risk factors associated with poor outcomes. METHODS: All Army patients undergoing arthroscopic or open Bankart repair for shoulder instability were isolated from the Military Health System Management Analysis and Reporting Tool between 2003 and 2010. Demographic variables (age, gender) and surgical variables (treatment facility volume, admission status, surgical technique) were extracted. Rates of surgical failure, defined as subsequent revision surgery or medical discharge with persistent shoulder complaints, were recorded from the electronic medical record and US Army Physical Disability Agency database. Risk factor analysis was performed with univariate t tests, χ(2) tests, and a multivariable logistic regression model with failure as the outcome. RESULTS: A total of 3,854 patients underwent Bankart repair during the study period, with most procedures having been performed arthroscopically (n = 3,230, 84%) and on an outpatient basis (n = 3,255, 84%). Patients were predominately men (n = 3,531, 92%), and the mean age was 28.0 years (SD, 7.5 years). A total of 193 patients (5.0%) underwent revision stabilization whereas 339 patients (8.8%) were medically discharged with complaints of shoulder instability, for a total combined failure rate of 13.8% (n = 532). Univariate analyses showed no significant effect for gender; however, younger age, higher facility volume, open repair, and inpatient status were significant factors associated with subsequent surgical failure. Multivariable analyses confirmed that young age (odds ratio [OR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91 to 0.96; P < .001), open repair (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.75; P = .001), and inpatient status (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.84; P = .004) were independently associated with failure by revision surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Young age remains a significant risk factor for surgical failure after Bankart repair. Patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair had a significantly lower surgical failure rate (4.5%) than patients who underwent open anterior stabilization (7.7%). Despite advances in surgical technique, 1 in 20 military service members required revision surgery after failed primary stabilization in this study.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2014
  • Citation: Waterman BR, Burns TC, McCriskin B, Kilcoyne K, Cameron KL, Owens BD. Outcomes after bankart repair in a military population: predictors for surgical revision and long-term disability. Arthroscopy. 2014 Feb;30(2):172-7.

Race and vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in a military population.

Study

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to determine if race is associated with vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) success in a military population. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted examining women with a history of at least one prior cesarean delivery who delivered at a single tertiary care military treatment facility. Data were collected pertaining to maternal demographics, medical and obstetric history, antepartum complications, intrapartum course, delivery mode, and maternal outcomes. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to determine the association of race and VBAC success. RESULTS: Four hundred seventy-six charts were reviewed from 2004 to 2011. African American women were more likely to require a cesarean delivery (P<.05) even after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. There was no difference in maternal morbidity between the racial groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a health care system with equal access, racial disparities remain. The effect of social factors that may influence such a disparity are thought to be attenuated in a military population. However, in our study, African American women were still significantly more likely to fail a VBAC attempt as compared with non-African American women. Race had no influence on morbidity, although this study was not powered to examine morbidity as a primary outcome.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Navy
  • Sponsoring Office: Naval Medical Center San Diego
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Brankin C, Stratton S, Piszczek C, You W. Race and vaginal birth after cesarean delivery in a military population. Obstet Gynecol. 2014 May;123 Suppl 1:139S.

Changes in Meeting Vigorous Physical Activity Guidelines After Discharge From the Military.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding physical activity (PA) after discharge from the military can inform theory on the role of habit and reinforcement in behavior maintenance and has implications for this population's future health. METHODS: Using data from 28,866 Millennium Cohort Study participants (n=3782 of whom were discharged during the years between assessments), we: 1) investigated changes in meeting federal PA Guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) following military discharge, and 2) determined predictors of meeting these Guidelines after discharge. RESULTS: MVPA declined more in those who were discharged than those who were not (-17.8 percentage points vs. -2.7 percentage points), with greater declines in former active-duty personnel, those who had deployed with combat exposures, had 14-25 years of service, and had been discharged more recently (>2 years prior). In those who were discharged, being normal or overweight (vs. obese), and a nonsmoker or former smoker (vs. current smoker) were positively associated with meeting MVPA Guidelines at follow-up, while meeting MVPA Guidelines at baseline and depression were inversely associated. CONCLUSIONS: Reductions in MVPA were substantial and unexpected. Increased understanding of transitional periods that may benefit from interventions to mitigate declines in PA will help prevent excess weight gain and physical inactivity-associated health consequences.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source:
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Littman A, Jacobson IG, Boyko EJ, Smith TC. Changes in Meeting Vigorous Physical Activity Guidelines After Discharge From the Military. J Phys Act Health. 2014 May 9.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and medication use by children during parental military deployments.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Parental deployment is associated with children's increased mental health needs. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common pediatric mental health diagnosis. We hypothesize children with ADHD will have increased mental health and medication needs during parental deployment. METHODS: Rtrospective cohort study of children with ADHD aged 4-8 years in the Military Health System. RESULTS: Of 413,665 children aged 4-8 years, 34,205 (8.3%) had ADHD and 19,123 (55.9%) of these were prescribed ADHD medications. During parental deployments, children with ADHD had a 13% increased rate of mental and behavioral health care visits (IRR 1.13 [95% CI 1.12-1.14; p < 0.00001]) and a decreased rate of medication changes (IRR 0.94 [95% CI 0.91-0.96; p < 0.00001]) compared to when parents were at home. Medication changes related to deployment varied by age; school-aged children had decreased medication events (IRR 0.88 [95% CI 0.86-0.91; p < 0.00001]) and preschool-aged children had increased medication events (IRR 1.05 [95% CI 1.02-1.10; p = .006]) during parental deployment. CONCLUSIONS: Dring parental deployment, children with ADHD aged 4-8 years have increased mental health visits and decreased ADHD medication changes. Younger children have increased medication changes, whereas older children have decreased changes during a parent's deployment.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Hisle-Gorman E, Eide M, Coll EJ, Gorman GH. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and medication use by children during parental military deployments. Mil Med. 2014 May;179(5):573-8.

A comparison of obesity prevalence: military health system and United States populations, 2009-2012.

Study

Abstract

Overweight and obesity prevalence has increased over the past 30 years. Few studies have looked at the enrolled Military Health System (MHS) population (2.2 million per year). This descriptive study examined trends in overweight and obesity in both children and adults from fiscal years 2009 to 2012 and compared them to the U.S. population. Prevalence in MHS children decreased over time for overweight (14.2-13.8%) and obesity (11.7-10.9%). Active duty adults showed an increase in overweight prevalence (52.7-53.4%) and a decrease in obesity prevalence (18.9-18.3%). For nonactive duty, both overweight and obesity prevalence remained relatively unchanged around 33%. For both children and adults, overweight and obesity prevalence increased with age, except for obesity in the nonactive duty ≥ 65 subgroup. When compared to the United States by gender and age, MHS children generally had a lower overweight and obesity prevalence, active duty adults had higher overweight and lower obesity prevalence, and nonactive duty adults had comparable overweight and obesity prevalence, except for obesity in both men in the 40 to 59 subgroup and women in ≥ 60 subgroup. More research on the MHS population is needed to identify risk factors and modifiable health behaviors that could defeat the disease of obesity.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Air Force
  • Sponsoring Office: United States Air Force Medical Support Agency
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Air Force
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2014
  • Citation: Eilerman PA, Herzog CM, Luce BK, Chao SY, Walker SM, Zarzabal LA, Carnahan DH. A comparison of obesity prevalence: military health system and United States populations, 2009-2012. Mil Med. 2014 May;179(5):462-70.
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Last Updated: April 30, 2020
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