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Military Hospitals and Clinics

Military hospitals and clinics are the core of the Military Health System. They are located on military bases and posts around the world. Military hospitals and clinics are also referred to as Direct CareDirect care refers to military hospitals and clinics, also known as “military treatment facilities” and “MTFs.”direct care, military treatment facilities or MTFs.

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WBAMC provides newborn blanket to minimize SIDS

Article
4/6/2017
Karson Winters, son of Army Spc. Samiya Winters and Spc. Deshau Winters, naps while wrapped with a safe sleep blanket, a toe-to-neck zip-up blanket designed to help newborns stay warm while reducing the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, at William Beaumont Army Medical Center. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

According to the American Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Institute, there are about 4,000 sleep-related infant deaths occurring each year in the United States

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Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Why do you want to be a military doctor?

Video
3/30/2017
Why do you want to be a military doctor?

During the 2017 Military Health System Female Physician Leadership Conference, we asked some military medical students and junior officers to share why they want to be a military medical doctor.

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Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Walter Reed makes new leadless pacemaker available to military patients

Article
3/13/2017
Surgeons at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center implant the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo)

Doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center are implementing the leadless pacemaker

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Military Hospitals and Clinics | Innovation | Technology | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

New GERD treatment, first in DoD, performed at WBAMC

Article
3/2/2017
Army Maj. Michael Goldberg (left), chief, Gastroenterology, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, and Army Maj. Christopher Calcagno (right), gastroenterologist, WBAMC, speak to Army Staff Sgt. Mario Talavera (center), following the first incisionless fundoplication procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) performed in the Department of Defense, at WBAMC. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

A new Food and Drug Administration approved incisionless procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease was performed recently at William Beaumont Army Medical Center

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Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

Course preps Army doctors, medics for deployment

Article
2/16/2017
Soldiers with Army Trauma Training Center’s Combat Extremity Surgery Course prepare a cadaver limb for placement of an external fixator. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

The course is specifically designed to prepare the Soldiers for the care of wounded while deployed

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Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Medical miracle: BAMC surgeons perform groundbreaking arm replant

Article
2/15/2017
Christopher Ebner (left to right), occupational therapist at the Center for the Intrepid, Kelsey Ward and Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Joseph Alderete, chief of surgical oncology and CFI medical director, pose for a photo at the CFI. Ward's arm was severed when a guardrail pierced the passenger-side window of her SUV in a car wreck on April 20, 2016. Brooke Army Medical Center surgeons performed their first above-the-elbow arm replant on the 22-year-old trauma patient. (U.S. Army photo by Lori Newman)

Brooke Army Medical Center surgeons performed their first above-the-elbow arm replant on a 22-year-old trauma patient last year and almost 10 months later the patient is thriving

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Extremities Loss | Clinical Affairs | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

Army orthopaedic residents fix breaks, break the mold

Article
1/27/2017
Army Capt. Marina Rodriguez (right), a third year resident with William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Orthopaedic Residency Program, assists Army Lt. Col. Justin Orr, orthopaedic residency program director, during a total ankle replacement on a beneficiary. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

With 25 residents on rotation and 12 staff surgeons, the Orthopaedic Residency Program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center is one of the largest in the Department of Defense

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Military Hospitals and Clinics

Hospital goes low, high tech to ensure patient safety

Article
1/19/2017
Evans Army Community Hospital operating room nurse Regina Andrews performs a diagnostic test on the RFID wand. The wand is used to locate surgical sponges embedded with an RFID chip. (U.S. Army photo by Jeff Troth)

To ensure the count of medical sponges is correct in its operating rooms, Evans Army Community Hospital has started using radio-frequency ID sponges

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Patient Safety | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Multi-Service Markets | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Innovation | Technology

Providing TLC for ICU babies

Article
1/19/2017
New mom Kimberly Neifert watches NICU Nurse Brandy Lor check the breathing rate of her daughter Ruelyn at Madigan Army Medical Center. Premature babies experience faster heart rates than adults and may also pause longer between breaths due to immature breathing patterns. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)

Needing the care of a neonatal ICU is not something most families anticipate

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Children's Health | Women's Health | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Puget Sound

Get framed by optometry

Article
1/4/2017
Those old jokes about Navy-issue eyeglasses being called ‘birth-control’ are not applicable anymore with a host of new stylish frames available from which to pick and choose. Since the new frames – nine different colors, style and sizes - were introduced last October, Optometry’s Optical Support Unit has made 1,124 new pairs of eye glasses for customers. (U.S. Air Force photo  by Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

Old jokes about Navy-issue eyeglasses being called ‘birth-control’ are not applicable anymore with a host of new stylish frames available

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Vision Loss | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Health Readiness | Puget Sound

DARPA provides groundbreaking bionic arms to Walter Reed

Article
12/28/2016
Dr. Justin Sanchez, director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Biological Technologies Office, fist-bumps with one of the first two advanced “LUKE” arms to be delivered from a new production line during a ceremony at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

DARPA is collaborating with Walter Reed to make bionic arms available to service members and veterans who are rehabilitating after suffering upper-limb loss

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Technology | Innovation | Warrior Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

'Lilypads' brighten pediatric patients' stay at BAMC

Article
12/27/2016
Lillian Sun, Amaya Mali and Sophie Rosenberg, students with the Westlake Robotics Club, display a few of their donated IV pole "lilypads" with the help of Army Col. Elizabeth Murray and Air Force Master Sgt. Sean Keene in an inpatient pediatric ward. The Robotics Club students constructed and donated 10 lily pads to pediatric patients at Brooke Army Medical Center. ( U.S. Army photo by Elaine Sanchez)

The ‘lilypads’ are decorated platforms that rest at the base of the IV pole, offering pediatric patients a fun place to sit as they move throughout the hospital

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Military Hospitals and Clinics | San Antonio

Dr. Guice reflects on Military Health System improvements

Article
12/23/2016
Dr. Karen S. Guice, acting assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, presents the keynote address opening the 2016 Military Health System Research Symposium in Orlando, Florida, recently.

The Defense Department’s top medical official reflected on her five-and-a-half year tenure at the Pentagon, notably a comprehensive review of the Military Health System

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Military Health System Review Report | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Working together ensures high-quality patient care

Article
12/20/2016
Puget Sound MHS logo

Supported by the Defense Health Agency, the Puget Sound MHS was selected as a pilot site for strategic patient communications

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Military Hospitals and Clinics | Puget Sound

Improving surgical safety

Article
12/7/2016
Medical personnel conduct a procedure at the Eisenhower Army Medical Center operating room. Eisenhower AMC was recognized by the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program for its surgical safety and quality of care for the second year in a row. (U.S. Army photo by John Corley)

The Army NSQIP program is part of a military, tri-service surgical quality collaboration with the Defense Health Agency

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Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | San Antonio
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