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Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

The Health Systems Performance Branch (HSPB) within the Defense Health Agency integrates the Clinical Quality Program and the DoD Patient Safety Program.  Our goal is to promote improved quality and patient safety by engaging, educating and equipping patient care teams to ensure the deployment of and adherence to evidence-based safe practices and the use of relevant clinical performance indicators to eliminate preventable harm throughout the Military Health System (MHS). 

We support the military mission by integrating a systems approach to promoting a culture of transparency, collaboration and accountability across the MHS. These practices will increase the likelihood of desired patient outcomes, increase confidence in the MHS healthcare delivery and build organizational commitment to protect the health of the patients entrusted to our care.

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EAMC recognized for high surgical quality for second consecutive year

Article
10/28/2016
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Eisenhower Army Medical Center has been recognized by the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program for its safety initiatives and quality of care again

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Air Force, Army team save lives at the DoD’s only Level 1 trauma center

Article
10/11/2016
Air Force Capt. (Dr.) Kjell Ballard, emergency room resident, asks a patient to make the OK sign to check mobility of the fingers at the San Antonio Military Medical Center on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Serving 20 counties in the Texas region, the SAMMC Emergency Department treats roughly 200 patients a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)

As the only Level 1 Trauma Center in the Defense Department, the medical facility is equipped and staffed to provide care for patients suffering from major traumatic injuries

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Bono reinforces support for disabled veterans, advocacy efforts

Article
9/23/2016
Defense Health Agency director Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono delivers keynote address to attendees of the Paralyzed Veterans of America’s ‘Mission:ABLE’ awards ceremony in downtown Washington, DC.

DHA director Vice Adm. Bono lauds the efforts of award recipients at the Paralyzed Veterans of America’s (PVA)‘Mission: ABLE’ awards ceremony and says advocacy groups help DHA serve disabled veterans.

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Cochlear implant opens up the world for Army colonel

Article
9/22/2016
Dr. Elizabeth Searing (right) makes initial adjustments via a computer to Lt. Col. James Morrison's cochlear implant. Dr. April Luxner, an audiologist with Cochlear Corporation, was on hand to witness Morrison's reactions to hearing with his right ear after 12 years of deafness. (U.S. Army photo by Jeff Troth)

In the past 12 years, Army Lt. Col. James Morrison has seen ear, head and neck, and neurology specialists at the six posts where he was stationed

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Hospital's sterile-processing techs are 'Gladiators' of patient safety

Article
9/14/2016
Army Staff Sgt. Oscar Domino (left), operating room technician, hands a sterile pack to Army Maj. Jerry Rivera-Santiago, sterile processing's officer in charge. Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center's Sterile Processing Department assembles and packs more than 400 surgical units monthly. (U.S. Army photo by Gloria Montgomery)

Sterile-processing medical technicians are the multipliers of hospital safety who clean, disinfect and sterilize the hospital and dental clinic's surgical tools

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Survival rates improving for Soldiers wounded in combat, says Army surgeon general

Article
8/26/2016
About 92 percent of Soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it home alive. Soldiers in a tactical critical care evacuation team prepare for a patient transfer mission at Forward Operating Base Orgun East, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Marleah Miller)

About 92 percent of Soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it home alive

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When the heat is on, corpsmen refine skills to save lives

Article
7/21/2016
(Left to right) Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Michael Barber, Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Mashfik Hossain, Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Laurence Lau and Navy Cmdr. Trevor Carlson, Camp Geiger Branch Medical Clinic department head, work quickly to lower the simulated heat casualty’s body temperature. A core temperature of 107.5 can result in irreversible brain damage and 109 could result in a coma or death. (U.S. Navy photo by Danielle M. Bolton)

The Geiger clinic, responsible for the care of School of Infantry – East students and staff, sees more heat casualties than any other clinic

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Maxillofacial prosthodontics brings normalcy to wounded patients

Article
7/20/2016
Air Force Maj. Stephen Cherrington (right), 59th Dental Group maxillofacial prosthodontist, checks the fitting of retired Army Master Sgt. Todd Nelson’s prosthetic ear at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Disfigured by circumstances while abroad or at home, maxillofacial prosthodontics gives wounded warriors, veterans and civilians a chance at living a normal life

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National Intrepid Center zeroes in on traumatic brain injury

Article
7/19/2016
The National Intrepid Center of Excellence, a directorate of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., helps active duty, reserve, and National Guard members and their families manage their traumatic brain injuries and accompanying psychological health conditions through diagnostic evaluation, treatment planning, outpatient clinical care, and TBI research.

The National Intrepid Center of Excellence, a directorate of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, helps active duty, reserve, and National Guard members and their families manage their traumatic brain injuries

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U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research looking for eye injury treatment

Article
6/17/2016
Army Capt. Elaine Por, a principle investigator and deputy task area manager in the Ocular Trauma Division at the USAISR, is looking for a novel way to treat eye injuries that can result in blindness.

A non-invasive treatment could be available to Wounded Warriors with eye injuries within the next two to three years

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Speech-Language Pathologists aid Wounded Warriors

Article
6/16/2016
A Marine takes a hearing test (U.S. Army photo)

Up to 20 percent of military active duty service members traumatically injured during deployments who were admitted to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center exhibited difficulty swallowing and eating, a condition called dysphagia

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Skin Cancer: What you need to know

Article
6/1/2016
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Mannino examines a Sailor using a dermatascope and magnifying loops during a skin cancer screening at Naval Amphibious Base, Coronado, California.

Story about skin cancer, various types, and how to recognize it

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William Beaumont Army Medical Center first DoD hospital to use new stent graft

Article
5/11/2016
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William Beaumont Army Medical Center became the first military treatment facility to use newly FDA approved “off-the-shelf” aortic branch device

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59th MDW ECMO team: Delivering life saving medical care across the globe

Article
5/3/2016
Members of the 59th Medical Wing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation transport team connect a patient to an ECMO system for transport from Lafayette General Medical Center, Louisiana, to San Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

The global Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation team is bedded down at the San Antonio Military Medical Center on nearby JBSA-Fort Sam Houston

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Occupational therapy: Restoring function and promoting independence

Article
4/22/2016
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Occupational Therapy is arguably the most misunderstood clinic in the hospital

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