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Hearing Loss

The potential risk of military service on hearing health and ear function is well documented.

The Hearing Center of Excellence focuses on the prevention and treatment of hearing loss and auditory injury among military personnel and veterans.

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With success comes ‘great momentum’ in hearing center’s future

Article
7/13/2017
Marine Staff Sgt. Charles Mitchell takes the annual audiogram test at Camp Pendleton, California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Khoa Pelczar)

DoD’s Hearing Center of Excellence works closely with other departments and organizations, including VA and NIH, to facilitate research focused on prevention, diagnosis, mitigation, treatment, and rehabilitation of hearing issues

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Hearing Loss | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives | Innovation

May is better speech and hearing month

Article
5/10/2017
U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds maintenance professionals, wearing hearing protection, watch  Thunderbird 5 taxi out during the Wings of Freedom Open House and Air Show performance, Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. Auditory injury is an invisible condition that is often viewed as an unavoidable, acceptable consequence of military service, but service-related hearing loss is largely preventable. Most hearing protection, if worn properly during noise-hazardous conditions, is effective in preventing hearing loss. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Stan Parker)

The Veterans Benefits Administration reports that tinnitus and hearing loss are the top two service-connected disabilities for U.S. military veterans

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Hearing Loss

DHA to welcome Hearing Center of Excellence to agency

Article
12/5/2016
The roar of a howitzer. The piercing scream of a jet engine. These are just a couple of the deafening sounds service members have to deal with. It’s just the nature of the business for the military, and no wonder why noise-induced hearing loss can be so prevalent among service members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Stephen D. Schester)

The center comes under formal control of the Defense Health Agency Dec. 11, 2016

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Hearing Loss

Hearing loss and brain injuries

Article
9/30/2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)

Becoming aware of how your surroundings can affect your hearing is a key factor in managing hearing problems associated with TBI

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Hearing Loss | Traumatic Brain Injury

Exiting an A-10C Thunderbolt

Photo
9/30/2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are ...

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Hearing Loss | Traumatic Brain Injury

Lt. Col. James Morrison getting adjustments to cochlear implant

Photo
9/22/2016
Dr. Elizabeth Searing (right) makes initial adjustments via a computer to Lt. Col. James Morrison's cochlear implant. Dr. April Luxner, an audiologist with Cochlear Corporation, was on hand to witness Morrison's reactions to hearing with his right ear after 12 years of deafness. (U.S. Army photo by Jeff Troth)

Dr. Elizabeth Searing (right) makes initial adjustments via a computer to Lt. Col. James Morrison's cochlear implant. Dr. April Luxner, an audiologist with Cochlear Corporation, was on hand to witness Morrison's reactions to hearing with his right ear after 12 years of deafness. (U.S. Army photo by Jeff Troth)

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Hearing Loss

Cochlear implant opens up the world for Army colonel

Article
9/22/2016
Dr. Elizabeth Searing (right) makes initial adjustments via a computer to Lt. Col. James Morrison's cochlear implant. Dr. April Luxner, an audiologist with Cochlear Corporation, was on hand to witness Morrison's reactions to hearing with his right ear after 12 years of deafness. (U.S. Army photo by Jeff Troth)

In the past 12 years, Army Lt. Col. James Morrison has seen ear, head and neck, and neurology specialists at the six posts where he was stationed

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Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Hearing Loss

Focus group works to shield Marines against deafening noise levels

Article
1/15/2016
A Marine fires a M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle, at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia.

Leaders discussed the existing technology and current policies of noise protection

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Hearing Loss

Noise pollution and hearing loss

Article
8/26/2015
Senior Airman Alexandra Washington, communications and navigations technician assigned to the 20th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, checks antennae signals on a B-52 Stratofortress, while wearing hearing protection.

Noise-related hearing loss is a tactical risk for individual warriors and unit effectiveness.

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Hearing Loss | Human Performance Resource Center

Army Hearing Program

Policy

Department of the Army Pamphlet 40-501

Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System – Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC)

Fact Sheet
10/1/2013

The Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System – Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC) is an information system designed to support personal auditory readiness and help prevent hearing loss through early detection.

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Technology | Hearing Loss
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