Back to Top Skip to main content

Traumatic Brain Injury

According to the Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC), 1.7 million people are diagnosed with a brain injury each year.

What is Traumatic Brain Injury—or TBI?

The Defense Centers of Excellence defines TBI as the result from a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Categories for TBI are:

  • Mild
  • Moderate
  • Severe
  • Penetrating

The most common form of TBI in the military is mild, and is also known as a concussion. According to Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, from 2000-2014 (3 QTR), more than 313,816 service members have been diagnosed with TBI.

You also may be interested in...

Brain injury sufferers find benefits in music therapy program

Article
11/17/2017
Army Staff Sgt. Sean Young, 2nd Battalion, 377th Parachute Field Artillery Regiment training room noncommissioned officer, strums the guitar during music therapy with Danielle Kalseth, 673rd Medical Operations Squadron creative arts and music therapist, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Music therapy sessions help rehabilitate patients with traumatic brain injury. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Caitlin Russell)

For people with TBI, music therapy can be instrumental to rehabilitation

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care | Traumatic Brain Injury

Centers of Excellence align under Defense Health Agency

Article
11/1/2017
DCoE has provided the MHS with the latest psychological health and traumatic brain injury clinical and educational information since 2007.

The Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) began realignment under the Defense Health Agency Oct. 1 as part of the ongoing Military Health System transformation

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Traumatic Brain Injury

Multiple choices, multiple answers as brain injury research evolves for future battlefield

Article
9/1/2017
Dr. Marcello Pilia of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command's Combat Casualty Care Research Program tests the I-Portal PAS tool - one of several emerging TBI detection devices - during a presentation at the Pentagon in May 2017. (Photo Credit: Adam Wyatt, TATRC)

Cutting-edge traumatic brain injury detection technologies discussed at the 2017 Military Health System Research Symposium in Kissimmee, Florida.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

NMRC presents research on recovery from mild TBI following uncomplicated mounted and dismounted IED blast at MHSRS

Article
8/29/2017
Photo By Katherine Berland | Dr. Anna Tschiffely shared findings on the effects of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) on service members during the first 30 days following an improvised explosive device (IED) blast during the Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) August 28 (U.S. Navy Photo/Katie Berland/Released)

A researcher from the Naval Medical Research Center shared findings on the effects of mild traumatic brain injury on service members during the first 30 days following an improvised explosive device blast

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | Research and Innovation

Wounded warriors' art therapy exhibit opens at DoD medical museum

Article
8/8/2017
Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Zachary A. Burgart, presented this artwork "Untitled," featured in "Battle Signs: Using Art Therapy to Process TBI and PTS Injuries and Trauma," installed at the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Silver Spring, Maryland, on display through September 2017. (National Museum of Health and Medicine photo by Matthew Breitbart)

This display of work and art are the Veterans' processing of loss of friends and identity/guilt/grief, and a multitude of other struggles war and combat have placed upon them

Recommended Content:

Warrior Care | Traumatic Brain Injury

Prevent TBIs this summer and beyond

Article
6/21/2017
Each year, more than 1 million people visit the emergency room because of TBIs. And contrary to common belief, most TBIs experienced by service members result from motor vehicle accidents, not exposures to blasts. TBI can damage your brain tissue, and it can impair your speech and language skills, balance and motor coordination, and memory. (MHS graphic)

Each year, more than 1 million people visit the emergency room because of TBIs. And contrary to common belief, most TBIs experienced by service members result from motor vehicle accidents, not exposures to blasts. TBI can damage your brain tissue, and it can impair your speech and language skills, balance and motor coordination and memory

Recommended Content:

Mental Wellness | Men's Health | Traumatic Brain Injury

How brain injury may affect communication skills

Article
5/24/2017
Laticia Jackson, a health educator, talks to a patient. Symptoms of communication disorders after a TBI can differ depending upon the type and severity of the injury. For many, problems with communication are the result of difficulties with attention and memory, such as not being able to follow a conversation, not with the ability to speak. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

How a service member communicates with others can change after a traumatic brain injury

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Traumatic Brain Injury | Mental Wellness

DoD brain injury center opens more sites for military TBI care

Article
5/16/2017
Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury Logo

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center recently added three new traumatic brain injury care network sites

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives | Mental Health Care

Innovative scanner designed to save Marines' lives on the battlefield

Article
5/15/2017
Mark Urrutic, project officer for Family of Field Medical Equipment Team at Marine Corps Systems Command, uses an Infrascanner to locate a simulated hematoma on a mannequin's skull. The Infrascanner is a portable, medical diagnostic device that provides early detection of intracranial hematomas-or bleeding within the skull-in the field, potentially saving lives and improving casualty care and recovery. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Ashley Calingo)

The Infrascanner is a portable, medical diagnostic device that provides early detection of bleeding within the skull, in the field

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | Technology | Innovation

Program offers holistic recovery tools to Soldiers with TBI

Article
5/9/2017
MIST Program participants engage in traditional and nontraditional therapies, such as creating symbolic masks. The MIST Program offers holistic treatment to service members with traumatic brain injuries and other traumatic conditions. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)

The holistic focus of MIST recognizes that the whole person is affected by brain injuries and the conditions that often accompany them

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Mental Health Care | Traumatic Brain Injury | Mental Wellness

Brain Injury Awareness Part 4: The road to recovery

Article
4/12/2017
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Colin Woodside is back to his favorite hobby of rock climbing, but with a constant awareness of the need for safety after suffering a severe TBI.

There are four parts of traumatic brain injury (TBI): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the final part in our series on TBI, we walk through the progress Coast Guard Petty Officer Colin Woodside continues to make in his recovery

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Brain Injury Awareness Part 3: Treatment puts TBI victim on road to recovery

Article
4/11/2017
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Colin Woodside on the long road to recovery after suffering a severe traumatic brain injury.

There are four parts of traumatic brain injury (TBI): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the third part in our series on TBI, we talk about the treatments available after a TBI.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Diagnoses of Traumatic Brain Injury Not Clearly Associated with Deployment, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001 – 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force.  TBI, particularly mild TBI or concussion, is the most common traumatic injury in the U.S. military. This analysis provides the estimated rates of incident TBIs among service members before their first-ever deployment as well as separately among service members during deployments/ after deployments. It also mentions factors that may explain why the TBI incidence rates among the previously deployed were higher than those of the never-deployed group. Moreover, it describes the demographic and military traits of service members diagnosed as TBI cases (before/after deployment). Categorization of person time during surveillance period included four categories: Group 1 (Never deployed/TBI before first-ever deployment), Group 2 (Currently deployed or within 30 days of return), Group 3 (previously deployed but not currently deployed nor within 30 days of return) and Censored after Diagnosis of TBI. From 2001-2016, 276,858 active component service members received first-time diagnoses of TBI. The crude overall incidence rate of TBI among deployed service members was 1.5 times that of service members assigned to Group 1 and 1.2 times that of service members in Group 3 during the surveillance period.  Total TBI cases by group were Group 1 42.8%, Group 2 13.2% and Group 3 44.0%. Incidence rates by group (per 100,000 person-years) were Group 1 1,141.3, Group 2 1,690.5, and Group 3 1,451.2. Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR and see fact sheets at www.Health.mil/AFHSB

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force. TBI, particularly mild TBI or concussion, is the most common traumatic injury in the U.S. military. This analysis provides the estimated rates of incident TBIs among service members before their first-ever ...

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

Brain Injury Awareness Part 2: Screening puts injured on right path to recovery

Article
3/27/2017
The HEADS card helps medics, leaders, and battle buddies in the field evaluate such injuries. HEADS stands for Headaches, Ears ringing, Amnesia, Dizziness, and "Something feels wrong" - all symptoms of concussion.

There are four parts of traumatic brain injury (TBI): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the second part in our series on TBI, we talk about the tools available to caregivers and troops in the field to determine a TBI

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Brain Injury Awareness Part 1: It all starts with prevention

Article
3/17/2017
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Colin Woodside discusses “the day that changed the rest of my life.”

There are four aspects of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the first of a four-part series, we meet a Coast Guardsman who has made it through all four areas

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 8

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.