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Traumatic Brain Injury

According to the Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC), 1.7 million people are diagnosed with a brain injury each year.

What is Traumatic Brain Injury—or TBI?

The Defense Centers of Excellence defines TBI as the result from a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Categories for TBI are:

  • Mild
  • Moderate
  • Severe
  • Penetrating

The most common form of TBI in the military is mild, and is also known as a concussion. According to Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, from 2000-2014 (3 QTR), more than 313,816 service members have been diagnosed with TBI.

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Prevent TBIs this summer and beyond

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6/21/2017
Each year, more than 1 million people visit the emergency room because of TBIs. And contrary to common belief, most TBIs experienced by service members result from motor vehicle accidents, not exposures to blasts. TBI can damage your brain tissue, and it can impair your speech and language skills, balance and motor coordination, and memory. (MHS graphic)

Each year, more than 1 million people visit the emergency room because of TBIs. And contrary to common belief, most TBIs experienced by service members result from motor vehicle accidents, not exposures to blasts. TBI can damage your brain tissue, and it can impair your speech and language skills, balance and motor coordination and memory

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How brain injury may affect communication skills

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5/24/2017
Laticia Jackson, a health educator, talks to a patient. Symptoms of communication disorders after a TBI can differ depending upon the type and severity of the injury. For many, problems with communication are the result of difficulties with attention and memory, such as not being able to follow a conversation, not with the ability to speak. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

How a service member communicates with others can change after a traumatic brain injury

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DoD brain injury center opens more sites for military TBI care

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5/16/2017
Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury Logo

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center recently added three new traumatic brain injury care network sites

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Innovative scanner designed to save Marines' lives on the battlefield

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5/15/2017
Mark Urrutic, project officer for Family of Field Medical Equipment Team at Marine Corps Systems Command, uses an Infrascanner to locate a simulated hematoma on a mannequin's skull. The Infrascanner is a portable, medical diagnostic device that provides early detection of intracranial hematomas-or bleeding within the skull-in the field, potentially saving lives and improving casualty care and recovery. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Ashley Calingo)

The Infrascanner is a portable, medical diagnostic device that provides early detection of bleeding within the skull, in the field

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Program offers holistic recovery tools to Soldiers with TBI

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5/9/2017
MIST Program participants engage in traditional and nontraditional therapies, such as creating symbolic masks. The MIST Program offers holistic treatment to service members with traumatic brain injuries and other traumatic conditions. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)

The holistic focus of MIST recognizes that the whole person is affected by brain injuries and the conditions that often accompany them

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Brain Injury Awareness Part 4: The road to recovery

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4/12/2017
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Colin Woodside is back to his favorite hobby of rock climbing, but with a constant awareness of the need for safety after suffering a severe TBI.

There are four parts of traumatic brain injury (TBI): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the final part in our series on TBI, we walk through the progress Coast Guard Petty Officer Colin Woodside continues to make in his recovery

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Brain Injury Awareness Part 3: Treatment puts TBI victim on road to recovery

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4/11/2017
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Colin Woodside on the long road to recovery after suffering a severe traumatic brain injury.

There are four parts of traumatic brain injury (TBI): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the third part in our series on TBI, we talk about the treatments available after a TBI.

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Brain Injury Awareness Part 2: Screening puts injured on right path to recovery

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3/27/2017
The HEADS card helps medics, leaders, and battle buddies in the field evaluate such injuries. HEADS stands for Headaches, Ears ringing, Amnesia, Dizziness, and "Something feels wrong" - all symptoms of concussion.

There are four parts of traumatic brain injury (TBI): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the second part in our series on TBI, we talk about the tools available to caregivers and troops in the field to determine a TBI

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Brain Injury Awareness Part 1: It all starts with prevention

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3/17/2017
Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Colin Woodside discusses “the day that changed the rest of my life.”

There are four aspects of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs): prevention, screening, treatment, and recovery. In the first of a four-part series, we meet a Coast Guardsman who has made it through all four areas

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Celebrate good times! No luck, charms or alcohol required

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3/17/2017
Marine Cpl. Edward Blodgett, wears a leprechaun hat at a regimental run in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day at Camp Pendleton, California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Khoa Pelczar)

Unless you’ve been hiding under the Blarney Stone, you’ve seen the shamrocks — St. Patrick’s Day is upon us

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Think Ahead: Observing Brain Injury Awareness Month

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3/16/2017
March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. 'THINK AHEAD: Be Safe. Know the Signs, and Get Help.'

Mild TBI, also known as a concussion, is common in the military in both garrison and theater

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Wearing a helmet can ‘protect your grape’

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3/13/2017
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Thien Trinh, a corpsman with Naval Hospital Pensacola’s Neurology Department, places a helmet on Knight Moore, 5, to check if it fits properly. Sailors from Naval Hospital Pensacola’s Neurology Department visited a local elementary school in Pensacola, Florida to promote helmet safety. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

Approximately 26,000 children and adolescents are treated in emergency departments annually for traumatic brain injuries

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Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury in your child

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3/6/2017
Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley Sandoval (left), 21st Force Support Squadron, secures Savannah Butler (right) into her car seat as Savannah's mom, Air Force Staff Sgt. Montie Butler (center) looks on. Sandoval provided car seat training to Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, parents at the Child Development Center in a program hosted by the 50th Space Wing safety office. (U.S. Air Force photo by Dennis Rogers)

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March marks Brain Injury Awareness Month

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Hana Rice, a guide with U.S. Military Outdoor Recreation, secures a climbing rope after repelling from an approximate 35 foot rock face within the National Network of Footpaths in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. Members of the climbing party were required to wear the appropriate climbing helmet and safety harness in order to prevent possible injuries such as traumatic brain injury. TBI awareness is observed throughout the month of March in hopes of spreading awareness of the trauma and potentially preventing future cases. (Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Brian Kimball)

March is National Brain Injury Awareness Month

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Partner with DVBIC to promote Brain Injury Awareness Month

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Army Col. Geoffrey G. Grammer

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center is the DoD center of excellence for traumatic brain injury

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