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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

Health Surveillance, Analysis and Insight for Action

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch is the central epidemiology health resource for the US Military and Public Health

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) is the central epidemiologic resource for the U.S. Armed Forces, conducting medical surveillance to protect those who serve our nation in uniform and allies who are critical to our national security interests. Explore our website to learn about the critical role AFHSB plays in force health protection.

AFHSB provides timely, relevant, actionable and comprehensive health surveillance information to promote, maintain, and enhance the health of military and military-associated populations.

AFHSB critical functions are:

  • Acquire, analyze, interpret, disseminate information, and recommend evidence-based policy
  • Develop, refine, and improve standardized health surveillance methods
  • Serve as the focal point for sharing health surveillance products expertise and information
  • Coordinate a global program of military-relevant infectious disease surveillance

Explore our health surveillance resources to learn how to utilize our data applications, systems and the ways our health information analysis supports worldwide disease surveillance and public health activities to improve the U.S. military's Force Health Protection (FHP) program.

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report MSMR Online SubscriptionThe Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) is AFHSB's flagship publication. The monthly peer-reviewed journal provides evidence-based estimates of the incidence, distribution, impact, and trends of health-related conditions among service members. Additionally, the MSMR focuses one issue per year on the absolute and relative morbidity burden attributable to various illnesses and injuries among service members and beneficiaries.

 View Current Report  View Archived Reports

Launch Proposal Management Information SystemThe Proposal Management Information Solution (ProMIS) program is a web-based application used to track surveillance projects funded by AFHSB's Global Emerging Infections Surveillance (GEIS) Operations section. Investigators in the GEIS partner network submit proposals for funding through the system, and GEIS Operations monitors the progress of those projects.

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DMED ButtonThe Defense Medical Epidemiology Database (DMED) provides worldwide access to de-identified data contained in the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS). Through this user-friendly interface, authorized users can create customized queries of disease and injury rates in active duty populations.

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Complications and Care Related to Pregnancy, Labor and Delivery among Active Component Service Women U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016

Infographic
1/5/2018
Maternal complications and delivery outcomes are important components of the overall health and well-being of reproductive-age service women. This analysis provides an update on pregnancy complications and characterizes the counts, rates, and trends of several specific pregnancy complications. FINDINGS •	55,601 U.S. service women whose pregnancies resulted in 63,879 live births had 657,060 medical encounters •	For all age groups, percentages of live births affected by preterm labor decreased, but during 2012 – 2016, the percentages of pregnant service members diagnosed with obesity increased. •	The percentage of pregnant service members affected by gestational diabetes was more than twice as high for obese women, compared with non-obese women (12.4% vs. 5.5%). Bar graph shows the number of medical encounters with a primary (first-listed) diagnosis of any pregnancy-related complication or indication for care decreased each year between 2012 and 2016. Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 11). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR  Background image: New born being provided medical attention by nurse. Secondary image: babies of diverse background on a blanket.

This analysis provides an update on pregnancy complications and characterizes the counts, rates, and trends of several specific pregnancy complications.

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Gestational diabetes among pregnant service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces 2012 – 2016

Infographic
1/5/2018
Gestational diabetes is an abnormal increase in blood sugar levels that can adversely affect the health of both a pregnant woman and her baby. During 2012 – 2016, 4,017 (6.3%) of active component female service members who had live births were affected by gestational diabetes. Women aged 25-34 and 35-49 years had consistently higher annual prevalences of gestational diabetes than younger females. The percentage of pregnant service members affected by gestational diabetes was more than twice as high for obese women as for non-obese women (12.4% vs. 5.5%). The percentage of live births affected by gestational diabetes increased with increasing age and was highest among Asians/Pacific Islanders. Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 11). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic documents the incidence and prevalence of gestational diabetes pregnant service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016.

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Contraception among active component service women, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016

Infographic
1/5/2018
Because the majority of women serving in the Armed Forces are of childbearing age, and women’s military career opportunities have expanded into combat roles, contraceptive health care is an increasingly important public health issue. The lack of available, population-based descriptive information on contraceptive use among U.S. service women has generated questions and concerns about ready access to these medical products. This infographic summarizes the annual prevalence of permanent sterilization, as well as use of long – and short-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs and SARCs, respectively), contraceptive counseling services, and use of emergency contraception from 2012 through 2016, among active component service women. FINDINGS •	2012 through 2016, Sterilization decreased from 4.2% to 3.6% LARC use increased from 17.2% to 21.7%; SARC use decreased from 38.5% to 30.4%. •	Emergency contraception use increased from 0.4% to 1.9%. •	Among deployed women, the average annual prevalence of permanent sterilization was 4.2%. •	For deployed women, LARC use was 17.9% SARC use was 28.0%. •	Emergency contraception use among deployed women was 0.4%. •	262,907 (76.2%) women of childbearing potential (WOCBP) used either a LARC or a SARC at some time during the surveillance period. •	The vast majority of service women have utilized at least one form of contraception, and women are selecting LARCs in greater numbers with each passing year. The bar graph displays information on the annual prevalence of contraceptive utilization, by type, service women of child-bearing potential, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012– 2016. Graphic displayed: contraception option. Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 11). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic summarizes the annual prevalence of permanent sterilization, as well as use of long – and short-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs and SARCs, respectively), contraceptive counseling services, and use of emergency contraception from 2012 through 2016, among active component service women.

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Global Influenza Summary: December 31, 2017

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12/31/2017

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Global Influenza Summary: December 24, 2017

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12/24/2017

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Global respiratory surveillance program detects dangerous pathogens to keep armed forces healthy

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12/21/2017
Data from the Department of Defense Global Respiratory Pathogen Surveillance Program are presented to the Food and Drug Administration's annual Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting to help inform the vaccine strain in the U.S. for the upcoming season that is administered to U.S. Armed Forces for health protection and readiness. (Photo Courtesy of  Defense Imagery Management Operations Center)

To reduce the impact of respiratory pathogens on service members, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch coordinates a global respiratory surveillance program for the military. Learn how the program detects dangerous pathogens to keep armed forces healthy.

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Live births among female service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016

Infographic
12/21/2017
Did you know…?  •	From 2012 – 2016, there were 63,879 live births to women of childbearing potential in the active component. The overall live birth rate was 64.9 live births per 1,000 person-years (p-yrs). The live birth rate decreased steadily from 69.8 per 1,000 p-yrs in 2012 to 59.7 per 1,000 p-yrs in 2016. The decrease was primarily driven by declining rates among women in their 20s. Overall, live birth rates were highest among women who were: •	30-34 years old •	Army members •	In healthcare occupations •	Married Of the total 63,879 live birth deliveries: •	24.7% were cesarean •	75.3% were vaginal Pie chart depicting this information displays. United States map displays showing the highest numbers of deliveries during the surveillance period reported by military hospitals at: •	Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, VA (7.4%) •	Naval Medical Center San Diego, CA (6.1%) •	The Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, TX (4.1%) •	Womack Army Medical Center, NC (3.8%) •	Tripler Army Medical Center, HI (3.7%) Live birth rates were broadly similar among the race/ethnicity groups, although the overall rate was slightly higher among American Indians/ Alaska Natives. Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No.11). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic documents live births among female service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces from 2012 – 2016.

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Pregnancies among female service members, Active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016

Infographic
12/21/2017
With the increasing numbers of service women and the expansion of roles available to women within the military, understanding the epidemiology of pregnancy is important for both the health of U.S. service women and the readiness of the U.S. fighting force, two closely related issues. Between 2012 – 2016, 344,536 unique women of childbearing potential (WOCBP) served at least 1 day in the military, and of those, 132,466 spend at least 1 day as a recruit trainee. Of the 224,718 WOCBP who served at any time in 2016, 13.1% had at least one pregnancy-related event during that year. A “pregnancy-related event,” refers to a health care encounter (visit) for which the record contains a diagnosis code for either pregnancy or a positive pregnancy test. In 2016, the highest prevalence of pregnancy-related events was among service women 30-34 years of age (16.8%) and among senior enlisted women (13.7%). Pie chart displays depicting the information. The annual prevalence of pregnancy-related events decreased slightly, from 14.2% in 2012 to 13.1% in 2016. Line plot graph displays this information. FINDINGS •	Prevalence of pregnancy-related events was approximately evenly distributed among the race/ethnicity categories and military occupation groups. •	A slightly higher percentage of WOCBP in the Army (14.5%) had pregnancy-related events compared to WOCBP in the other services. •	A higher percentage of women who were married (21.4%) had a pregnancy-related event, compared with those in the single (5.7%) or “other” (8.8) categories. •	Only 0.2% of women who served during a recruit training period in any given year had a pregnancy-related event. Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 11). Go to www.Health.mil/MSMR.  Graphic on infographic shows a pregnant service member.

With the increasing numbers of service women and the expansion of roles available to women within the military, understanding the epidemiology of pregnancy is important for both the health of U.S. service women and the readiness of the U.S. fighting force, two closely related issues. This infographic documents pregnancies among female service members, ...

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Pregnancies and live births among female service members

Infographic
12/21/2017
Women have been able to serve officially in the U.S. military since 1901. Both the number of women serving in the active component and their occupational roles have steadily increased and expanded. Currently, almost one in seven active component service members are female and more than 95% of military occupational specialties are open to women. This infographic summarizes data on the demographic and military characteristics of women including women of childbearing potential (WOCBP) in the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces during 2012 – 2016. Data on pregnancy-related care and birth rates are also presented. FINDINGS •	In 2016, WOCBP comprised the vast majority of active component service women. •	202,849 women served in the active component of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps. 197,947 (97.6%) were WOCBP. Pie chart displays depicting this information. •	In 2016, 13.1% of all WOCBP had at least one pregnancy-related event. Pie chat displays depicting this information. Female stick figures display to show visual of the largest proportions of WOCBP. Breakdown of WOCBP by service: •	Army (32.9%) •	Air Force (30.0%) •	Navy (29.7%) •	Marine Corps (7.5%) Pie chart displays to visually depict breakdown of WOCBP by service. The largest proportions of WOCBP were: •	In a communications / intelligence occupation (32.3%) •	Junior enlisted rank (46.5%) •	Non-Hispanic white (43.4%) •	20 – 24 years old (34.3%) Live births: •	There were 63,879 live births during the surveillance period. •	Overall live birth rate was 64.9 live births per 1,000 person-years (p-yrs). This rate of live births decreased steadily from 69.8 per 1,000 p-yrs in 2012 to 59.7 per 1,000 p-yrs in 2016. Line graph displays this information. Rates of live births were highest among: •	Women who were 30 – 34 years old •	Enlisted or junior officer rank •	Army •	In healthcare / intelligence occupations •	Married Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 11). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic summarizes data on the demographic and military characteristics of women including women of childbearing potential (WOCBP) in the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces during 2012 – 2016. Data on pregnancy-related care and birth rates are also presented.

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Global Influenza Summary: December 17, 2017

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12/17/2017

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GEIS funds medical surveillance at military laboratories to assist Combatant Commands

Article
12/14/2017
Nazia Rahman, right, manager of the Uniformed Services University’s Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) Repository, discusses a poster on the sexually-transmitted infection with U.S. Air Force Major Trinette Flowers-Torres, lead for GEIS’s Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Focus Area, left, and Navy Commander Franca Jones, front, chief of GEIS, examine poster on AMR surveillance. (AFHSB photo by Briana Booker).

At the crux of infectious disease surveillance is the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch’s (AFHSB) Global Emerging Infections Surveillance (GEIS) Section that funds the majority of surveillance at military laboratories. Learn about AFHSB's role as a Combat Support Agency within the Defense Health Agency (DHA).

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Global Influenza Summary: December 10, 2017

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12/10/2017

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Global Influenza Summary: December 3, 2017

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12/3/2017

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AFHSB's health surveillance program supports Defense Department global health engagement efforts

Article
11/30/2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Douglass, left, an aerospace medical technician, watches as Liberian health care workers properly put on their personal protective equipment as part response by the Defense Department operation to provide logistics, training and engineering support during the Ebola virus outbreak. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terrance D. Rhodes)

Navy Commander Franca R. Jones, chief of the Global Emerging Infections section at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) discusses how AFHSB's health surveillance program supports the Defense Department global health engagement efforts.

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Global Influenza Summary: November 19, 2017

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11/19/2017

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