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Tuberculosis

TuberculosisTuberculosis (TB) is caused by a bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection from this bacteria starts in the lungs, but TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain by passage through the blood. Not everyone infected with TB bacteria becomes sick. As a result, two TB-related conditions exist: latent TB infection (LTBI) and TB disease. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal.

There are two kinds of tests that are used to detect TB bacteria in the body: the TB skin test (TST) and TB blood tests.  A positive TB skin test or TB blood test only tells that a person has been infected with TB bacteria. It does not tell whether the person has latent TB infection (LTBI) or has progressed to TB disease. Other tests, such as a chest x-ray and a sample of sputum, are needed to see whether the person has TB disease.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Challenges with diagnosing and investigating suspected active Tuberculosis disease in military trainees

Infographic
9/14/2017
The incidence rates of active tuberculosis (TB) disease in the general U.S. population and the U.S. military have declined over the past two decades, with foreign birth remaining one of the strongest correlates of risk. Recently, there have been several atypical and asymptomatic presentations of active and suspected TB cases among the population of trainees at Joint base San Antonio – Lackland, TX. Between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2016, a total of 14 U.S. and international military personnel in training at JBSA – Lackland were hospitalized for suspected pulmonary TB. The variety of atypical presentations and their resulting diagnostic and public health challenges promoted this retrospective review of all hospitalized cases. This case series raises concerns about the increasing reliance on molecular tests for rapid diagnosis of active TB, especially in patients with minimal to no pulmonary symptoms. Findings •	The incidence rate in the training population was 1.89 per 100,000 population •	5 of 14 U.S. and international military personnel were diagnosed with active TB disease •	All were male, aged 19 – 29 years •	Only one TB case had pulmonary symptoms, but these were not suggestive of TB •	8 of 14 trainees were asymptomatic at the time of hospital admission, and tuberculin skin test and interferon gamma release assay results were highly variable Chart displays with descriptions and diagnoses of trainees hospitalized for suspected active tuberculosis, Joint Base San Antonio  – Lackland, TX, 2010 – 2016 (N=14). Access the report in MSMR Vol. 24 No. 8 August 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR  Images featured on infographic: •	Human lungs •	Image of TB

The incidence rates of active tuberculosis (TB) disease in the general U.S. population and the U.S. military have declined over the past two decades, with foreign birth remaining one of the strongest correlates of risk. This infographic documents findings from several atypical and asymptomatic presentations of active and suspected TB cases among the ...

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis Survillance and Control Program

Policy
  • Identification #: N/A
  • Date: 11/26/2013
  • Type: Directives
  • Topics: Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis Control Program

Policy
  • Identification #: N/A
  • Date: 2/21/2013
  • Type: Directives
  • Topics: Tuberculosis

Use of Tubersol as the Preferred Brand of Tuberculin

Policy
  • Identification #: N/A
  • Date: 10/22/2008
  • Type: Directives
  • Topics: Tuberculosis

Policy for the Use of Tubersol as the Preferred Brand of Tuberculin

Policy

This memo establishes Tubersol as the preferred brand of tuberculin.

  • Identification #: HA Policy: 08-012
  • Date: 9/29/2008
  • Type: Memorandums
  • Topics: Tuberculosis
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