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Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

infographic about mosquito bite preventionTo prevent an outbeak of any mosquito-borne illness, its important to control the mosquito population and protect yourself from mosquito bites. 

  • Use insect repellant
  • Treat your clothing and gear if you'll be outside
  • Mosquito-proof your home

Traveling Overseas? 

Mosquito bites are bothersome enough, but when you consider risks, like getting sick with Zika, dengue, chikungunya or other mosquito-borne illness, its important to protect yourself and your family when traveling overseas. 

Avoid Mosquito Bites

  • Research your travel destination: Learn about country-specific travel advice, health risks, and how to stay safe by visiting CDC Travelers' Health website.
  • Use insect repellent: Use an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellent. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.
  • Cover up: Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Keep mosquitoes outside: Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens. If you are not able to protect yourself from mosquitoes inside your home or hotel, sleep under a mosquito bed net.

After Your Trip

Visit your healthcare provider right away if you develop a fever, headache, rash, muscle or joint pain.

  • Tell your doctor about recent international travel.
  • Visit the CDC's Getting Sick after Travel webpage for more information.

Publications and Resources

File Description
Mosquito Control for Urban Areas This brochure from the Air Force Civil Engineer Center offers tips for controlling the mosquito population in urban areas.

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Summer Safety 2018 Mosquito Safety

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6/20/2018
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Surveillance for Vector-Borne Diseases, Active and Reserve Component Service Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2010 – 2016

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2/14/2018
Within the U.S. Armed Forces considerable effort has been applied to the prevention and treatment of vector-borne diseases. A key component of that effort has been the surveillance of vector-borne diseases to inform the steps needed to identify where and when threats exist and to evaluate the impact of preventive measures. This report summarizes available health records information about the occurrence of vector-borne infectious diseases among members of the U.S. Armed Forces, during a recent 7-year surveillance period. For the 7-surveillance period, there were 1,436 confirmed cases of vector-borne diseases, 536 possible cases, and 8,667 suspected cases among service members of the active and reserve components. •	“Confirmed” case = confirmed reportable medical event. •	“Possible” case = hospitalization with a diagnosis for a vector-borne disease. •	“Suspected” case = either a non-confirmed reportable medical event or an outpatient medical encounter with a diagnosis of a vector-borne disease. Lyme disease (n=721) and malaria (n=346) were the most common diagnoses among confirmed and possible cases. •	In 2015, the annual numbers of confirmed case of Lyme disease were the fewest reported during the surveillance period. •	Diagnoses of Chikungunya (CHIK) and Zika (ZIKV) were elevated in the years following their respective entries into the Western Hemisphere: CHIK (2014 and 2015); ZIKV (2016). The available data reinforce the need for continued emphasis on the multidisciplinary preventive measures necessary to counter the ever-present threat of vector-borne disease. Access the full report in the February 2018 MSMR (Vol. 25, No. 2). Go to www.Health.mil/MSMR  Background graphic shows service member in the field and insects which spread vector borne diseases.

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Air Force launches aerial spray mission against mosquitoes

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Air Force Reserve Tech. Sgt. Ken Hesser, a crew chief with the 910th Maintenance Group, Youngstown Air Reserve Station, Ohio, marshals a C-130H Hercules aircraft as the aircrew taxis the plane for takeoff on the flightline of the Kelly Field Annex. Hesser is among more than 90 Reserve Citizen Airmen supporting the 910th’s mosquito control aerial spray operations over areas of eastern Texas devastated by Hurricane Harvey. The 910th Airlift Wing operates the Department of Defense’s only aerial spray capability to control pest insect populations, eliminate undesired and invasive vegetation and disperse oil spills in large bodies of water. Due to large amounts of standing, polluted water, the numbers of pest insects are increasing significantly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Bob Barko Jr.)

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DoD vaccine research saves military, civilian lives

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Malaria vaccine candidate proves effective in Navy Medicine clinical trial

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All Things Mosquito

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Obama: Zika poses significant threat, public should take precautions

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Yellow fever mosquitoes – Aedes aegypti – are reared in the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research insectary by the thousands for use in pre-clinical Zika vaccine experiments and for research into new vector control products and methods. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research photo)

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Stay Healthy on the Road to Rio

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Chikungunya Infection Among MHS Beneficiaries in the Western Hemisphere

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Planning a trip?

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Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Viruses Like Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya

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