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Human Performance Resource Center

Human Performance Resource Center (HPRC) website is for U.S. Warfighters, their families, and those in the field of HPO who support them.Human Performance Resource Center logo The goal is Total Force Fitness: Warfighters optimized to carry out their mission as safely and effectively as possible. 

Focus Area Resources

  • Physical Fitness: Optimized physical conditioning that maintains performance, prevents injury and illness, and speeds recovery is essential to military readiness.
  • Environment: Deployment into locations of extreme environmental conditions makes exceptional demands on the physical and mental fitness of Warfighters.
  • Nutrition: The exceptional demands placed on military personnel make good nutrition crucial. HPRC provides information on nutrition that is based on solid research.
  • Dietary Supplements: Warfighters often turn to dietary supplements because of the extreme demands of military performance. Making an informed decision about supplement use can be difficult, and a bad decision could adversely affect health.
  • Family and Relationships: Family relationships and one’s larger social environment are crucial to Warfighter health and performance.
  • Mind Tactics: Mental fitness—including toughness and resilience—contributes to the overall goal of optimum performance.
  • Total Force Fitness: Total Force Fitness (TFF) is a framework for building and maintaining health, readiness, and performance in the Department of Defense. It views health, wellness, and resilience as a holistic concept where optimal performance requires a connection between mind, body, spirit, and family/social relationships.

Ask the Expert

If you can't find the answer to your question in one of our Focus Area Resource sections (above), click the icon below to ask an expert your specific questions. 

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HPRC Blog

Read the HPRC blog to learn about quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

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Watch out for 'hidden' sugars

Article
7/14/2017
Some sugars occur naturally in fruits and milk products. However, other sugars are added to foods and drinks during preparation, processing, or at your table. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Caleb McDonald)

Some sugars occur naturally in fruits and milk products. However, other sugars are added to foods and drinks during preparation, processing, or at your table.

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Eat a rainbow of colorful produce

Article
6/12/2017
For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes. (U.S. Army photo by Honey Nixon)

Eating colorful fruits and veggies can help reduce your risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes and some cancers too

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Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Summertime food safety

Article
5/30/2017
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. To avoid this, follow good cooking tips. Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The CDC estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses

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Protect your back during your PCS

Article
5/22/2017
Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix. So be mindful of how you’re lifting and moving while you’re packing up and loading up. (U.S. Navy photo)

Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix

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Human Performance Resource Center | Preventive Health

The scoop on probiotic and prebiotic foods

Article
5/5/2017
Prebiotic foods include bananas, onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus, artichokes, and whole grains. (Courtesy photo)

Benefits from eating foods with probiotics and prebiotics occur when they’re part of a diet that includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat sources of dairy and protein

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Daily nutrition strategies for endurance

Article
4/26/2017
Fueling for endurance events starts by eating a balanced diet, high in variety. Consuming carbs from various sources before training and throughout each day will be keep you energized. Protein after your workouts will help you recover from your workout so you can train again tomorrow. (U.S. Army photo)

Performance nutrition really begins during training, when you consistently fuel your body with the proper amounts and kinds of calories and nutrients

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How to run hills

Article
4/24/2017
Service members of Joint Task Force Guantanamo and Naval Station Guantanamo Bay run up John Paul Jones Hill. Running hills is one of the best ways to get in shape, as long as you run them correctly. Your form is important for running uphill, just like it is for running on flat ground. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kellie Bliss)

Running hills is one of the best ways to get in shape, as long as you run them correctly

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Boost your push-up performance

Article
4/18/2017
Push-ups are a simple, but telling, exercise. They measure your upper-body strength and endurance, but they’re often a sticking point for service members during their fitness tests. So, how can you improve your push-up performance? The short answer is: Do more push-ups. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

Practicing your push-ups is the best way to increase your strength and endurance

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Exercise intensity: Less isn’t always more

Article
4/5/2017
Army Reserve Sgt. Mindy Baptist (center), stretches out after morning battalion physical training exercise. Not every workout needs to top out the intensity scale. In fact, doing too much too often can lead to overtraining and injury. Remember to listen to your body and incorporate rest or light days into your workout regimen. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Aaron Berogan)

Exercise intensity is relative, so you can benefit from exercise at a level that you consider high intensity

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DoD campaign guides military community on use of supplements

Article
3/23/2017
Operation Supplement Safety aims to help people make informed, responsible decisions on supplement use. (U.S. Air Force graphic)

A DoD initiative through the Human Performance Resource Center, offers guidance to people about the potential benefits and dangers of using supplements

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Six ways to “spring performance forward”

Article
3/10/2017
Warmer temperatures and longer days mean more opportunities to get outside. Exercising outdoors can calm your nervous system, help you recover from stressful events, and improve your overall well-being. (DoD photo)

Six ways to leverage the longer periods of daylight and spring your performance forward.

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Oral health matters

Article
3/3/2017
A Soldier with C Company, 1st Battalion, 61st Infantry Regiment brushes his teeth on a cold morning at the Victory Forge field training exercise on Fort Jackson, South Carolina. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hamilton)

Despite advances in dental care and hygiene, deployed service members are still at risk of ‘trench mouth’ – technically referred to as necrotizing periodontal disease

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SuperTrack nutrition for fitness

Article
2/16/2017
Exercise and diet are ways to keep the pounds off. One of the best ways to start losing weight or just improve your nutrition overall is to keep track of what you eat and drink every day. (MHS photo illustration)

One of the best ways to start losing weight or just improve your nutrition overall is to keep track of what you eat and drink every day

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Avoid sitting disease

Article
2/14/2017
A DHHQ employee bikes to work. Bike or walk to work, if possible. If you don’t live close enough to bike or walk the entire commute, try walking for at least part of your travel time. For example, park further from your building. Or choose a higher level in the parking garage. (Courtesy photo)

The more time you spend sitting, the greater your risk of disease

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Screen time impacts dream time

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2/8/2017
Time spent with smartphones, tablets, and computers can impact your ability to get healthy sleep. Turn off handheld devices and televisions at least two hours before bedtime. Try to avoid lying in bed and scrolling through social media and email before bedtime too. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Staff Sgt. Jamal Sutter)

Time spent with smartphones, tablets, and computers can impact your ability to get healthy sleep

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