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Brain Injury Awareness Toolkit

To link directly to this toolkit from your websites, use this link: [Health.mil/BrainInjuryToolkit].

Our goal is to increase traumatic brain injury (TBI) awareness and improve health care providers’ ability to identify, care for, and treat all those who are affected by TBI. A TBI is a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain. According to the Defense Health Agency Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence, 430,720 service members have been diagnosed with a first-time TBI since 2000.

Recognized each year in March, Brain Injury Awareness Month serves as an opportunity to share information with the military community about Traumatic Brain Injury. A TBI is a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain, and depending on severity, can have severe and long lasting effects on anyone who experiences one.

Messages for Communicators

  • As an “invisible wound of war” and an injury that can happen in any setting, TBI presents complex and challenging problems for many service members and their families.
  • According to the Defense Health Agency (DHA) Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence (TBICoE), as of February 2021, 426,394 service members have been diagnosed with a first-time TBI since 2000.
  • The Department of Defense (DoD) is committed to protecting the brain health of our service members.
  • Even a mild TBI can impact one’s entire body, mind, and spirit.
  • Sustaining brain health and preventing injury is critical, as TBI can create changes in mood, personality, and behavior, and affects service members’ ability to complete their mission.

Download the Toolkit


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March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. Be TBI Ready. #BIAMonth. health.mil/BIAMonth

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Brain Injury Awareness Month "Be TBI Ready" Infographic

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2/24/2021
March is Brain Injury Awareness Month. Be TBI Ready. A traumatic brain injury—or TBI—is a blow or jolt to the head that disrupts the normal function of the brain. The severity of the TBI is determined at the time of the injury and may be classified as: mild, moderate, severe, or penetrating.

During Brain Injury Awareness Month, TBICoE and the MHS will promote the theme “Be TBI Ready” — recognizing that health care providers and others in the military community need to be aware of the latest educational trainings, research, fact sheets, and other available resources to prevent, diagnose, and treat TBI.

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Brain Injury Awareness Month | Traumatic Brain Injury | Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence | TBI Educators | Brain Injury Awareness Toolkit

Returning to Duty After Concussion

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2/24/2021
What's the best way to recover from a concussion? Returning to duty too soon after a concussion can lead to prolonged symptoms, decreased readiness, poor marksmanship, accidents and falls, and increased risk of more concussions. Progressively increasing activity in a step-wise manner can help you resolve your symptoms and return to duty safely. Ask your primary health care provider about TBICoE's Progressive Return to Activity to help you return to duty as quickly and safely as possible. Visit health.mil/TBICoE.

This TBICoE infographic gives an overview of the risks of returning to duty too soon after a concussion and explains how a progressive increase in activity can help get you back to duty safely. Returning to duty too soon after concussion can lead to prolonged symptoms, poor marksmanship, decreased readiness, accidents and falls, and increased risk of more concussions.

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Brain Injury Awareness Month | Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence | Patient and Family Resources | TBI Educators | Provider Resources | Brain Injury Awareness Toolkit

Sleep After Concussion

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2/18/2021
Sleep After Concussion. Service members with TBI report 3 times more sleep problems. TBIs can happen anywhere, only 16.9 percent of TBIs happen while deployed. Visit health.mil/TBIFactSheets to learn more about sleep problems and how to improve them

"Sleep After Concussion" is intended for patients and caregivers of those who have sustained a TBI. The infographic reviews general information of sleep-related concerns and points towards additional educational resources.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence | Patient and Family Resources | TBI Educators | Traumatic Brain Injury | Sleep | Brain Injury Awareness Toolkit

Sleep After mTBI

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11/19/2020
Sleep After mTBI

"Sleep After mTBI" is intended for providers to show the importance of screening and treating service members affected by sleep issues following mTBI.

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Traumatic Brain Injury Center of Excellence | Provider Resources | Brain Injury Awareness Toolkit | Sleep
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