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Extreme Heat

Extreme heat happens in the summer when temperatures are much hotter and/or humid than average, which means it varies by location. Exposure to extreme heat, particularly coupled with high levels of physical exertion and insufficient hydration, can cause serious health issues, and even death. 

We've provided these graphics and suggested social content for you use to communicate messages about extreme heat.

Approved Social Media Content

Feel free to tailor any of these approved social media messages to use locally on your platforms.

General Messages

Messaging for Older Adults

Messaging for Pet Safety

Messaging for Children's Safety

Risk for Heat-Related Illness

Graphics

These graphics are available for your use on your web or social platforms.


Extreme Heat

Infographic offers general safety tips for situations of extreme heat.


Safety Tips for Older Adults

Infographic offers tips for older adults in situations of extreme heat


Checking on Older Adults

[Plan. Prepare. Protect. Natural Disaster Resource Guide. Extreme Heat Safety Tips: Checking In with Older Adults If you have an older adult (age 65 and older) in your family, neighborhood, or community, check in with them during extreme heat, when temperatures are more hot or humid than normal. Older adults are more likely to experience heat-related health problems. Ask yourself these questions: 1) Are they drinking enough water? 2) Do they have access to air conditioning? 3) Do they know how to keep cool? 4) Do they show any signs of heat-related illness? Why are older adults at increased risk? 1) Their bodies don’t adjust as well as younger people to sudden changes in temperature 2) They are more likely to have a chronic medical condition 3) They may take prescription medicines that affect their body’s ability to control temperature  Remember! Heat-related deaths and illnesses are preventable. During an emergency, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. To learn more extreme heat safety tips, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat #BeReady #Prepare2Protect www.newsroom.tricare.mil/Disaster


Pet Safety

Plan. Prepare. Protect. Natural Disaster Resource Guide. Extreme Heat Safety Tips: Keeping Your Pets Safe. Extreme heat can also affect your pets. Image of dog and cat drinking water from a bowl. Extreme heat is when temperatures are more hot or humid than normal. Follow these tips: never leave your pet in a parked car, limit outdoor activities, watch for signs of overheating, don’t keep your pets outside for too long, bring your pet inside to cool down, provide plenty of fresh water, keep their water in a shaded area, and take your pet to the groomer, as shorter hair may help keep them cool. Remember! Leaving a window open in your parked car isn’t enough to keep your pets cooled down or safe from heat-related illness. For more pet safety tips, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/emergencies. Be ready at a moment’s notice. Visit: www.newsroom.tricare.mil/Disaster. TRICARE logo


Keeping Children Safe

Plan. Prepare. Protect. Natural Disaster Resource Guide. Extreme Heat Safety Tips: Keeping Your Child Safe. Hello, summer! Summer may be the perfect time to enjoy the outdoors with your children. However, when temperatures are more hot or humid than normal, take extra precautions. Follow these tips: never leave your child in a parked car, rolling windows down isn’t enough; dress your kid in loose, lightweight, and light-colored clothing; make sure your child drinks plenty of fluids, and limit sugar; remember protective gear, such as hats, to prevent sunburn; and seek medical care immediately if your child shows signs of heat-related illness. Important! Sunscreen is not recommended for babies who are 6 months old or younger. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests keeping infants out of the sun during mid-day and using protective clothing if they have to be in the sun. For more extreme heat safety tips, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat. Be ready at a moment’s notice. Visit: www.newsroom.tricare.mil/Disaster. TRICARE logo.


Safety Tips for Heat-Related Illness

Plan. Prepare. Protect. Natural Disaster Resource Guide.  Extreme Heat Safety: Increased Risk for Heat-Related Illness. Extreme heat is when temperatures are more hot or humid than normal. Heat-related health problems are preventable, but some factors put you at increased risk for illness, such as exhaustion or heat stroke. What are the risk factors? Common risk factors include: High levels of humidity, fever, alcohol use, dehydration, prescription drugs, heart disease, poor circulation, sunburn. Follow these quick tips: Wear appropriate clothing, stay indoors, be careful during outdoor activities, pace yourself, wear sunscreen, don’t leave children or pets in parked cars, and avoid hot and heavy meals. FOR EMERGENCIES, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room immediately. For more extreme heat safety information, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat. #BeReady #Prepare2Protect. TRICARE Logo.


How Hot is Too Hot?

Heat Related Illness: How Hot is Too Hot

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