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Get to Know the COVID-19 Vaccines

A header graphic that supports confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine.

Vaccines are one of the most effective ways to improve public health, prevent communicable diseases, and reach community-level immunity.

FDA Licensed COVID-19 vaccine: COMIRNATY®

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first COVID-19 vaccine on Aug. 23, 2021.
  • The vaccine has been known as the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine, and will now be marketed as COMIRNATY® (koe-mir’-na-tee), for the prevention of COVID-19 disease in individuals 16 years of age and older.
  • The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine also continues to be available under emergency use authorization (EUA), including for individuals 12 through 15 years of age and for the administration of a third dose in certain immunocompromised individuals.
  • COMIRNATY® contains messenger RNA (mRNA), a kind of genetic material. The mRNA is used by the body to make a mimic of one of the proteins in the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • The result of a person receiving this vaccine is that their immune system will ultimately react defensively to the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • COMIRNATY® has the same formulation as the EUA vaccine and is administered as a series of two doses, three weeks apart.

FDA Emergency Use Authorized COVID-19 Vaccines

  • It has never been easier for all DOD eligible and authorized people age 12 and above to get a COVID-19 vaccine at a DoD immunization site. Beneficiaries can also receive vaccines from state and local vaccination sites, retail pharmacies, and civilian providers.
  • Emergency Use Authorized (EUAs) can be used by the FDA during public health emergencies to provide access to medical products that may be effective in preventing, diagnosing, or treating a disease. EUAs are granted if the FDA determines known and potential benefits of a product, when used to prevent, diagnose, or treat the disease, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product.
  • Moderna's two-shot and Johnson & Johnson's single-shot COVID-19 vaccines continue to be available under EUA.
  • The COVID-19 vaccine is available under EUA for children ages 12 through 15, and for a third booster dose in those with compromised immune systems.

Boosters and Additional Vaccine Series Doses

  • Although we continue to see stable and highly effective protection against hospitalizations and severe outcomes for people who have been vaccinated against COVID-19, we are seeing a decrease in vaccine effectiveness against infection.
  • It is critical to get COVID-19 vaccines to further reduce risks of COVID-19 and its more severe outcomes. Nearly all the cases of severe disease, hospitalization, and death continue to occur among those not yet vaccinated against COVID-19.
  • If you have an immune system that is moderately to severely impacted, the CDC recommends you may receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna). This would be at least four weeks after your second dose.
  • For those with immunocompromising conditions, the vaccine was found to be only 63% effective against hospitalizations associated with COVID-19, over a 24 week study.

COVID-19 Infection Risk Compared to Vaccines

  • Millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses have been given to service members, family members, retirees, and other DOD personnel.
  • Many people express concern about COVID-19 vaccine risks and side effects; however, the risks of vaccine-preventable infections are much higher than the risks associated with the COVID-19 vaccines themselves.
  • We encourage our Service members, civilians, contractors, and beneficiaries to talk to their friends and family members about why they've been vaccinated against COVID-19.
  • Find more information about COVID-19 vaccines at the CDC website.

Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) Safety Messaging

mRNA Safety and Development

Viral Vector Vaccines Safety and Development

COVID-19 Vaccine Safety Monitoring

Potential Serious Risk of COVID-19 Illness Versus Current Known Safety of COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects

Adverse Reactions from COVID-19 Vaccines

Getting Your Second Shot

Graphics: Get to Know the COVID-19 Vaccine

Use the educational content above and the graphics in this section to provide information to TRICARE beneficiaries about the COVID-19 vaccines to increase confidence in the development, effectiveness and safety of the vaccines.

Main Infographic: Get to Know the COVID-19 Vaccines

Get to know the vaccines – types of vaccines, how they work and safety monitoring.

Printable Version (PDF)


Get to Know the COVID-19 Vaccines

Get to know the vaccines – they do not contain the live virus, they do not interact with our DNA, and have been tested rigorously.

Printable Version (PDF)


How COVID-19 Vaccines Work

Describes how the mRNA and viral vector vaccines work to educate beneficiaries about the COVID-19 vaccines.

Printable Version (PDF)


Safety Monitoring

Graphic that assures beneficiaries that the COVID-19 vaccines are monitored for safety. Has information on how they are being reviewed. Graphics include doctors in a laboratory and a doctor with a shield fending off the virus. The MHS and TRICARE logos are on the bottom right.

Printable Version (PDF)


Get Your Second Shot

Get Your Second Shot! You're not fully vaccinated - or protected - until you receive your second shot of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.

Additional Graphics for Vaccine Promotion

These products are available for you to use to promote getting the vaccine on your digital platforms.


Bring Your Vaccination Card to Your Second Shot

Graphic saying that keeping track of your vaccination card is important. Includes a helpful tips section, a link to www.tricare.mil/covidvaccine, and what to do when you didn’t get your vaccination card or don’t have a copy. The TRICARE logo is on the bottom right of the page.

Your vaccination card is important–Keep track of it!


Vaccines Save Lives

Polio and smallpox are almost non-existent because of vaccines. We can eliminate COVID-19 if you get vaccinated. Graphic showing that vaccines work and save lives. Includes a black and white image on the top half listing polio and smallpox on the left hand side. Includes a QR code to schedule vaccination appointments, and the TRICARE logo on the bottom right of the page.


Get the Vaccine

Images of syringes, hand soap, and facemask are on the left-hand side of the graphic. Text describes the availability to get vaccinated at retail pharmacies, with links provided for more information. The TRICARE logo is placed on the bottom right.

Graphics include images of syringes, hand soap, and facemask are on the left-hand side of the graphic as well as the TRICARE logo on the bottom right. Text includes links on vaccination information in MTFs, state health departments, and retail pharmacies.

TRICARE COVID-19 vaccination. Get the facts. Image of pharmacist. You can get the COVID-19 vaccine from any civilian pharmacy at no charge, even non-network pharmacies, but here are some things to keep in mind. For network pharmacies: You can get the vaccine at no charge from any TRICARE-network pharmacy; Contact your network pharmacy first to see when you can get your vaccine and what processes they may have in place. To find a network pharmacy, visit: https://militaryrx.express-scripts.com/find-pharmacy. For non-network pharmacies: You can get the vaccine at no charge from any non-network pharmacy – the pharmacy is not allowed to bill you. Non-network pharmacy coverage rules apply for medications (non-vaccines); If you get anything other than the COVID-19 vaccine, you’re responsible for that cost, based on your TRICARE plan; to learn more, visit: www.tricare.mil/NonNetworkPharmacy. Remember, the COVID-19 vaccines are being administered based on CDC and DOD priorities. Be sure to call first to see if it’s your time to get the vaccine. Active Duty Service Members: If you get your COVID-19 vaccine at a civilian pharmacy, follow your Service policy guidance for recording the vaccine in your health record. To learn more, visit: www.tricare.mil/COVIDVaccine. Current as of Feb. 5 2021. TRICARE logo.

Printable Flyer


Protect Yourself, Your Unit, Your Family, Your Community

Protect Your Family

A smiling family sits together on a couch. Text over the image reads “Protect yourself, your unit, your community, your family. Get vaccinated.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter

Printable Poster

Protect Yourself

Several soldiers wearing masks stand together. Text over image reads “Protect your unit, your family, your community, yourself. Get vaccinated.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter

Printable Poster

Protect Your Unit

A large group runs down the road. Text over image reads, “Protect yourself, your family, your community, your unit. Get vaccinated.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter

Printable Poster

Protect Your Community

A bald man wearing glasses holds a basket of food. Text over image reads, “Protect your unit, yourself, your family, your community. Get vaccinated.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter

Printable Poster


Vaccinate For Your Child

A child runs into the arms of a smiling soldier in front of a plane. Text over image reads, “COVID-19 Vaccine. I’m vaccinating for my . . . Child.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Vaccinate For Your Family

A soldier shows the screen of his phone to an elderly couple wearing masks. Text over image reads, “COVID-19 Vaccine. I’m vaccinating for my…Family.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Vaccinate For Your Community

A soldier wearing a mask stands in front of a pile of boxes and holds a box in his hands. Text over image reads, “COVID-19 Vaccine. I’m vaccinating for my . . . Community.”

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


CDC-MHS Co-Branded Products

Air Force firefighters use a hand-held hose to extinguish a fire inside a mock C-123 training device during an aircraft rescue firefighting training exercise at Keesler Air Force Base

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Airmen assigned to the Georgia National Guard’s 165th and 116th Security Forces Squadrons bow their heads during prayer while observing the 59th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C.

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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elizabeth Williams, a 35th Medical Support Squadron aerospace medical technician, displays medical equipment in an ambulance at Misawa Air Base, Japan.

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U.S. Army Spc. Reginald Carman, Spc. Drake Thompson, and Spc. Demonte Raven, 46th Military Police Company, Michigan National Guard, pose for a photo on the U.S. Capitol steps after their recent promotion in Washington, D.C.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Department of the Air Force Police Officer Libran Selfe (center) checks IDs while Airman 1st Class Jacob Humble, an installation entry controller, stops traffic at the U.S. Air Force Academy’s South Gate.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Quinton Le Quieu, 355th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, poses for a picture with his MWD, Silke, at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, Oct. 27. 2020.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Adm. Karl Schultz, Commandant of the Coast Guard speaks with Petty Officer 1st Class Julie Bosman, a response technician with the Coast Guard National Strike Force Atlantic Strike Team, located in Fort Dix, N.J., regarding Coast Guard operations for the 2021 Presidential Inauguration at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling, Washington, Jan. 16, 2021.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Master-at-Arms 2nd Class James Volponi responds to a simulated bomb threat at Naval Branch Health Clinic at Naval Air Station Key West during Exercise Solid Curtain.

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Airmen and training instructors participate in a U.S. Air Force basic military training graduation and coining ceremony, Aug. 27, 2020, for the 331st Training Squadron at the Pfingston Reception Center on Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas.

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U.S Air Force Staff Sgt. Roberto Canales, 355th Security Forces Squadron response force leader, poses for a picture at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, Oct. 29. 2020.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


A security forces NCO at the Wild West Air Show in Cheyenne, Wyo.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician 1st Class Keith Lawrence, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 11 Detachment Bangor, surveys a vehicle during an antiterrorism drill for Exercise Citadel Shield-Solid Curtain 2021, Feb. 8, 2021.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


 

An airman hugs a loved one at Rosecrans Air National Guard Base in St. Joseph, Mo., Nov. 19, 2020, upon returning from a deployment to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility supporting operations Inherent Resolve and Resolute Support.

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Army Spc. Austin Dycha, a member of the New York National Guard Military Funeral Honors Team, plays taps during the funeral of Army Spc. Levelzo Lyles in Buffalo, N.Y., May 14, 2020. At all other times during the service, Dycha wore a face mask as part of precautions being used during military funerals to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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1st Lt. Bryan Fuller, who is the assistant S2 (Intelligence, security, and information operations) for the 138 Field Artillery Brigade, Kentucky National Guard and community president of first Southern National Bank, poses with his wife, Jessica, and two sons, Ace, 5, Talon, 1.

Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Army Spc. Ying Chen, a New York National Guardsman, prepares a dosage of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the Camp Smith Training Site Medical Readiness Clinic, N.Y., Dec. 18, 2020.

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Crystal Tyler, pharmacy technician, prepares an injection for an Operation Warp Speed patient volunteer at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Nov. 16, 2020.

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Army Pfc. Destiny Buenavente, a combat medic specialist assigned to Kleber Army Health Clinic, disinfects a blood pressure monitor following a patient's medical examination, July 30, 2020.

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Airmen with COVID Theater Hospital-1 participate in a military appreciation ceremony at Community Regional Medical Center in Fresno, Calif., Sept. 10, 2020. CTH-1 consists of medical providers, nurses, technicians and support staff from the Air Force 60th Medical Group providing lifesaving care alongside their civilian counterparts in hospitals across California.

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Graphic for Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter


Grocery delivery man dropping off groceries to a customer's house.

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Educational Content

The educational content below can be used to build COVID-19 vaccine confidence in TRICARE beneficiaries.

How Do Vaccines Work?

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

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