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Physical Activity

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Get moving to look and feel your best! Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things you and your family can do to maintain and improve your health. Visit the following sites to learn about the benefits of physical activity and how you can get moving:

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Addressing emotional responses to threat of Coronavirus

Article
3/20/2020
U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kathleen A. Myhre, 446th Airman and Family Readiness Center noncommissioned officer in charge, meditates outside the 446th Airlift Wing Headquarters building on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, Feb. 12, 2020. Myhre traveled to India in 2016 to study to become an internationally-certified yoga instructor. She now shares her holistic training with Reserve Citizen Airmen of the 446th AW. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Mary A. Andom)

Even if you’re feeling healthy, medical professionals recommend staying home and limiting social contact as much as possible

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Preventive Health | Mental Wellness | Physical Activity | Combat Support | Public Health | Coronavirus | Coronavirus

The benefits of dog walking

Article
2/3/2020
Spending time with your dog is a great way to work on the eight pillars of Total Force Fitness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, regular walking or playing with pets can decrease blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and triglyceride levels. Pets can also help manage loneliness and depression by providing companionship. (Courtesy photo)

Dog walking not only encourages people to get out of their homes and socialize, but pets also benefit

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Physical Activity

Athletic trainers are enablers of Marine Corps readiness

Article
1/29/2020
Marine Corps Pfc. Barbara Pujolllopiz, (left), an administrative specialist with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, performs ammo can lifts while Capt. Katheryn Evazich, the MEU's adjutant, observes and counts repetitions during a Combat Fitness Test aboard Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The CFT is an annual Marine Corps physical training requirement in the which assesses combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tawanya Norwood)

Athletic trainers are arriving at units throughout the Marine Corps to help keep Marines in the fight longer

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Physical Activity

The simple – and complicated – task of shoveling snow

Article
2/5/2019
Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Seifridsberger shovels knee-deep snow to build a simulated hasty firing position during training exercise Ready Force Breach at Fort Drum, New York. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew Carroll)

When in the throes of winter weather, there are ways to prepare for a successful, injury-free snow shoveling activity

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Winter Safety | Reserve Health Readiness Program | Health Readiness | Physical Activity

New Year, New You

Article
1/28/2019
Nutritionists at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center stress people eat healthy, well-balanced meals, include exercise and set realistic goals for weight loss. (Photo courtesy of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center)

One of the major pitfalls as to why diets fail is “jumping in with both feet”

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Physical Activity

A new year marks a new you

Article
1/18/2019
Navy Reserve Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center, Phoenix perform a 1.5-mile run during the physical readiness test at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Arizona. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Drew Verbis)

Changes in lifestyle don’t have to be drastic to be effective

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Health Readiness | Physical Activity

Sticks and stones can break bones – and so can osteoporosis

Article
10/11/2018
Master Sgt. Kimberly Kaminski, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, flips a 445-pound tire during a workout at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates. Resistance training is just one of many steps to take to fight osteoporosis. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ross A. Whitley)

Steps to take today to build a future of healthy bones

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Nutrition | Physical Activity | Women's Health

Swimming for good health: Just go with the flow

Article
9/6/2018
A midshipman participates in the 500-yard swim portion of a physical screening test as part of the explosive ordnance disposal summer cruise at Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jeff Atherton)

Aquatic exercise is a low-impact alternative to running

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Going the distance runs in the family

Article
6/14/2018
Elisa Zwanenburg (left) and Al Richmond (right) engage in their favorite father-daughter activity, marathon running. (Courtesy photo by James Frank)

For this father/daughter team, running, and the Marine Corps principles that carry them, are in their blood

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Mental Wellness | Physical Activity | Men's Health

Deep vein thrombosis: What you need to know

Article
4/9/2018
Jamia Bailey (center) with her parents, James and Pia, after she underwent a procedure in December at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, to help prevent deep vein thrombosis from recurring. DVT is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep inside the body. (Courtesy photo)

Everyone’s potentially at risk, vascular surgeon says

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Public Health | Preventive Health | Heart Health | Physical Activity | Month of the Military Child

Small changes, big results: Healthy lifestyle choices can make a difference for heart health

Article
4/6/2018
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, director of the Institute for Health System Innovation & Policy at Boston University, provides insight on the importance of heart health. From 2010 to 2016, Woodson served as the assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. He is also a brigadier general in the United States Army Reserve. (Photo courtesy of Boston University)

Risk for heart disease, the number one killer of Americans every year, can be decreased through healthy lifestyle and nutrition choices

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Heart Health | Nutrition | Physical Activity

Update: Exertional Rhabdomyolysis Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012 – 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by the rapid breakdown of overworked intracellular muscle, skeletal muscle cells and the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream. It is a significant threat to U.S. military members during physical exertion, particularly under heat stress. This report summarizes numbers, rates, trends, risk factors and locations of occurrences for exertional heat injuries, including exertional rhabdomyolysis for 2012-2016. In 2016, there were 525 incident diagnoses of rhabdomyolysis between 2013 and 2016 rates increased 46.2 percent – 69.7 percent of cases occurred during May through September. Risk factors for exertional rhabdomyolysis include being male, younger than 20 years of age, black, non-Hispanic, low level of physical fitness, prior heat injury and exertion during warmer months. Additional information about the causes and prevention of exertional rhabdomyolysis can be found in the MSMR at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by the rapid breakdown of overworked intracellular muscle, skeletal muscle cells and the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream. It is a significant threat to U.S. military members during physical exertion, particularly under heat stress. This report summarizes numbers, rates, trends, risk factors and locations of occurrences for exertional heat injuries, including exertional rhabdomyolysis for 2012-2016.

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Physical Activity

Update: Exertional Hyponatremia U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water. There were 1,519 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members from 2001 through 2016. 86.8 percent were diagnosed and treated without having to be hospitalized. 2016 represented a decrease of 23.3 percent from 2015. In 2016, there were 85 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members and 77.6 percent of exertional hyponatremia cases affected males.  The annual rate was higher among females. Service members age 40 and over were most affected by exertional hyponatremia. High risk service members of exertional hyponatremia were: •	Females •	Service members aged 19 years or younger •	White, non-Hispanic and Asian/ Pacific Islander service members •	Recruit Trainees •	Marine Corps members Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Physical Activity

What is Rhabdomyolysis?

Infographic
3/21/2017
Although regular exercise is good for the body, too much physical activity can do more harm than good. Rhabdomyolysis is the rapid breakdown of overworked muscle cells, following the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream, causing many complications during physical exertion. This infographic provides information about the symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis, prevention and treatment.  How to avoid: •	Thoughtfully plan out your exercise routines •	Drink adequate amounts of fluid •	Minimize your workout time in extreme heat conditions How to treat: •	IV fluids/ fluid replacement •	Urinary Alkalization •	Blood transfusion  Symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis •	Difficulty in arm motion / trouble lifting objects •	Muscle weakness, muscle swelling and leg fatigue •	Fever, confusion, loss of consciousness •	Nausea and vomiting •	Dark colored urine or lack of urine  Learn more at Health.mil/MSMR

Rhabdomyolysis is the rapid breakdown of overworked muscle cells, following the release of toxic fibers into the bloodstream, causing many complications during physical exertion. This infographic provides information about the symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis, prevention and treatment.

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Physical Activity | Summer Safety

12 Days of Fitmas

Infographic
12/14/2016
infographic showing 12 exercises you can do from now until Christmas

Want to stay in shape over the holidays, but not sure where to start? Guard Your Health has you covered with its 12 Days of Fitmas challenge – a daily dose of quick exercises you can fit into your hectic schedule! #MerryFitmas

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Physical Activity
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