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Physical Activity

Photo: Adults hold children's feet while they do situps.

Get moving to look and feel your best! Engaging in regular physical activity is one of the most important things you and your family can do to maintain and improve your health. Visit the following sites to learn about the benefits of physical activity and how you can get moving:

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App helps Guard Soldiers prepare for physical fitness test

Article
10/4/2017
New app available through Guard Your Health will help Soldiers prepare for their physical fitness assessments. (U.S. Army photo)

Guard Your Health recently launched Guard Fit

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Physical Activity | Technology | Health Readiness

Advice to young athletes: A variety of sports is the spice of life

Article
9/25/2017
Children participate in a sports clinic at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The installation partnered with the YMCA of Pikes Peak Region to teach young athletes the fundamentals of baseball, gymnastics, soccer, and basketball. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff. Sgt. Wes Wright)

Young athletes who focus on one sport instead of sampling a variety are more likely to suffer overuse injuries

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Children's Health | Physical Activity

Repetition, intensity can build a ‘recipe for injury’ during workouts

Article
9/22/2017
Avoiding any sudden increases in activity level, duration, load, and intensity can help prevent overuse injuries. Injuries can also happen as a result of technique errors, such as poor form during strength training exercises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Robert Cloys)

Doing too much too soon, or too much of the same, can lead to overuse injuries but there are many ways people can prevent these injuries

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Physical Activity | Preventive Health | Operation Live Well

Setting goals, logging miles: How to train for a running event

Article
9/20/2017
Runners participate in the Mulberry Island Half Marathon at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, in September 2016. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard)

Whether you’re training for a 5K or a full marathon, preparing properly takes more than just running

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Physical Activity | Operation Live Well

NHRC research studies link between injury and fitness

Article
8/31/2017
Graphic from NHRC Public Affairs

Dr. Karen Kelly, a physiologist with the Naval Health Research Center’s (NHRC), discussed her recent work examining the relationship between training requirements, fitness and musculoskeletal injuries, during a breakout session at the Military Health System Research Symposium (MHSRS) Aug. 30.

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Physical Activity | Medical Research and Development

Men's health is important too

Article
6/20/2017
June marks Men’s Health Month, an opportunity to increase awareness about health issues important to men such as prostate, testicular, skin and colon cancers, hypertension, obesity and heart disease. (MHS graphic)

This month the Military Health System will focus on the importance of recognizing preventable health problems and encouraging early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys in the DoD community

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Men's Health | Physical Activity

Men's Health: Take charge

Article
6/9/2017
Men should see their primary care manager for regular checkups. Checkups can help diagnose issues early, before they become a problem, and sometimes before symptoms appear. (U.S. Navy photo)

The top five leading causes of death among men are heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, chronic lower respiratory disease, and stroke

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Men's Health | Physical Activity

Retired soldier says bad health behaviors a 'guy thing,' vows to get healthier

Article
6/8/2017
Russell Henderson, retired from the Army since 2002, tries to shed his "guy thing" bad habit of not getting enough exercise by using an elliptical machine at the gym. (Courtesy photo)

Men are more likely to make bad health choices than women, sometimes blaming it on being a 'guy thing'

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Men's Health | Physical Activity

Men’s vitality, good health habits formed in uniform go together

Article
6/7/2017
Retired Army Maj. Bill Gleason’s active lifestyle in Savannah, Georgia, includes cycling and sharing full-time day care duties with his wife for three grandchildren ages 8, 6, and 4. (Courtesy photo)

Men can maintain strength and vitality by sticking with the good health habits they formed in the military.

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Physical Activity | Men's Health

Daily nutrition strategies for endurance

Article
4/26/2017
Fueling for endurance events starts by eating a balanced diet, high in variety. Consuming carbs from various sources before training and throughout each day will be keep you energized. Protein after your workouts will help you recover from your workout so you can train again tomorrow. (U.S. Army photo)

Performance nutrition really begins during training, when you consistently fuel your body with the proper amounts and kinds of calories and nutrients

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Nutrition | Physical Activity | Human Performance Resource Center

How to run hills

Article
4/24/2017
Service members of Joint Task Force Guantanamo and Naval Station Guantanamo Bay run up John Paul Jones Hill. Running hills is one of the best ways to get in shape, as long as you run them correctly. Your form is important for running uphill, just like it is for running on flat ground. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kellie Bliss)

Running hills is one of the best ways to get in shape, as long as you run them correctly

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Physical Activity | Human Performance Resource Center

Boost your push-up performance

Article
4/18/2017
Push-ups are a simple, but telling, exercise. They measure your upper-body strength and endurance, but they’re often a sticking point for service members during their fitness tests. So, how can you improve your push-up performance? The short answer is: Do more push-ups. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

Practicing your push-ups is the best way to increase your strength and endurance

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Physical Activity | Human Performance Resource Center

Exercise intensity: Less isn’t always more

Article
4/5/2017
Army Reserve Sgt. Mindy Baptist (center), stretches out after morning battalion physical training exercise. Not every workout needs to top out the intensity scale. In fact, doing too much too often can lead to overtraining and injury. Remember to listen to your body and incorporate rest or light days into your workout regimen. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Aaron Berogan)

Exercise intensity is relative, so you can benefit from exercise at a level that you consider high intensity

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Physical Activity | Human Performance Resource Center

5210 campaign fights childhood obesity by encouraging better nutrition, less screen time, more exercise

Article
4/5/2017
5210 Campaign Logo

5210 Healthy Military Children campaign encourages children to get five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day; fewer than two hours of recreational time in front of a TV, tablet, portable video game, or computer screen; one hour of exercise each day; and zero sugary drinks

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Nutrition | Physical Activity | Children's Health

Update: Exertional Hyponatremia U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can result from loss of sodium and/or potassium as well as relative excess of body water. There were 1,519 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members from 2001 through 2016. 86.8 percent were diagnosed and treated without having to be hospitalized. 2016 represented a decrease of 23.3 percent from 2015. In 2016, there were 85 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component service members and 77.6 percent of exertional hyponatremia cases affected males.  The annual rate was higher among females. Service members age 40 and over were most affected by exertional hyponatremia. High risk service members of exertional hyponatremia were: •	Females •	Service members aged 19 years or younger •	White, non-Hispanic and Asian/ Pacific Islander service members •	Recruit Trainees •	Marine Corps members Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Exertional Hyponatremia occurs during or up to 24 hours after prolonged physical activity. It is defined by a serum, plasma or blood sodium concentration below 135 millequivalents per liter. This infographic provides an update on Exertional Hyponatremia among U.S. Armed Forces, information on service members at high risk. Exertional hyponatremia can ...

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Physical Activity
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