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Tobacco-Free Living

Photo:  Cigarettes in an ash tray.

Tobacco-free living is avoiding use of all types of tobacco products — including cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, pipes and hookahs — and also living free from secondhand smoke exposure. For information on the health risks of tobacco use and resources on how to stop using it or avoid starting, please visit the following sites:

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Medical Encounters for Tobacco Dependence, U.S. Armed Forces 2015 and 2016

Infographic
5/30/2017
•	In 2016, there were 11,617 medical encounters for tobacco dependence with 7,209 individuals affected from the U.S. Armed Forces. •	In 2015, there were 16,985 medical encounters for tobacco dependence, with 10,244 individuals affected from the U.S. Armed Forces. PIE CHART: •	10,244 individuals affected from the U.S. Armed Forces in 2015. •16,985 medical encounters for tobacco dependence in 2015. •7,209 individuals affected from the U.S. Armed Forces in 2016. •11,617 medical encounters for tobacco dependence in 2016.  That’s a 31.60% decrease of medical encounters; 29.63% less individuals affected from the U.S. Armed Forces between 2015 and 2016. Background behind pie chart shows used cigarettes on the ground.  Don’t forget to text MIL to 47848 on World No Tobacco Day (May 31st) to receive advice on being tobacco free. This is a great resource for service members wanting to quit tobacco. Pictured below this text is a service member sending a text message for tips on quitting tobacco. #JoinTheMovement #NoTobacco Source: Defense Health Agency, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016. MSMR. 2017; 24 (4): 2-8. Source: Defense Health Agency, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2015. MSMR. 2016; 23(4): 2-7.

This infographic documents medical encounters for tobacco dependence and individuals affected from the U.S. Armed Forces between 2015 and 2016.

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Tobacco-Free Living | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

How to walk away from tobacco

Article
5/26/2017
Quitting tobacco is hard. In fact, it’s common for people to relapse several times before kicking the habit completely. Whether your preference is lighting a cigarette or using a smokeless variety, tobacco can be difficult to part with. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class James L. Miller)

As bad habits go, smoking is pretty common

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Tobacco-Free Living

Heart Health Month: Know your family history, change your future

Article
1/30/2017
Dr. Terry Adirim, deputy assistant secretary of Defense for Health Services Policy and Oversight

Dr. Terry Adirim explains why it’s important for heart health to know your family history and know how you can affect your future

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Heart Health | Tobacco-Free Living

Cold Turkey Trot brings laughs, support and encouragement to DHHQ

Article
11/23/2016
Air Force Lt. Col. William Malloy, military assistant to the deputy director of DHA, joined in on the fun and provided motivation to fellow participants by dressing as a turkey for the race.

As part of the Great American Smokeout, DHA shows support for tobacco cessation through annual Cold Turkey Trot outside of DHHQ

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Tobacco-Free Living

Smokeless Tobacco Use in the US Military

Presentation
11/1/2016

Smokeless Tobacco Use in the US Military briefing to the Defense Health Board, Nov. 1, 2016.

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Tobacco-Free Living

Healthy hearts part two: Tobacco and its effects on your heart

Article
2/8/2016
Hand holding a cigarrette

During February, the Military Health System recognizes the need for good heart health. In the second article in our series, we talk about the effects tobacco has on the heart and blood vessels.

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Tobacco-Free Living | Heart Health

Healthy hearts: It all starts with lifestyle

Article
2/1/2016
Army Maj. Roger Williams, a flight surgeon from the 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, listens to his patient's blood circulation with a stethoscope at the Troop Medical Center on Camp Humphreys, South Korea.

February is Heart Health Month for the Military Health System. In the first in our series, we look at the risk factors that affect heart health, including the things we can affect and those we cannot.

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Practice Healthy Living Habits

Infographic
1/19/2016
Infographic listing 5 key healthy habits for the new year

A list of healthy living habits you can take on in 2016.

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Operation Live Well | Nutrition | Physical Activity | Tobacco-Free Living

Defense Health Agency Observes the Great American Smokeout with a “Cold Turkey” Trot

Article
11/25/2015
Air Force Lt. Col. Bill Malloy dressed as the Cold Turkey at the Defense Health Agency Cold Turkey Trot for the Great American Smokeout, November 24, 2015.

The Great American Smokeout, observed on the third Thursday of November, challenges smokers to quit smoking for just a day, with hope that being smoke-free for 24 hours will convince them to quit for good.

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Assistant Surgeon General of the United States talks tobacco cessation

Article
11/20/2015
Rear Admiral Scott F. Giberson, assistant surgeon general of the United States

The assistant surgeon general of the United States, kicked off The Great American Smokeout at the Defense Health Headquarters

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Rain forces turkey to trot inside for Great American Smokeout

Article
11/19/2015
Navy Vice Admiral Raquel Bono (left), Director of Defense Health Agency,  Air Force Lt. Col. Bill Malloy (center, role-playing the turkey) and Air Force Chief Master Sergeant Edward S. Vottero, Senior Enlisted Advisor, make their way around the headquarters encouraging agency workers who smoke to quit for the day and beyond. The turkey was originally scheduled to lead the DHA’s Cold Turkey Trot marking the Great American Smoke Out, but inclement weather forced it to seek shelter inside. The Cold Turkey Trot is rescheduled for Nov. 24. (Courtesy photo)

Defense Health Agency employees got a surprise visit during the Great American Smokeout, Thursday, Nov. 19, as a large, glittery turkey made its rounds encouraging agency workers who smoke to quit for the day and beyond. Accompanying the turkey during its journey was the agency’s new director, Vice Admiral Raquel Bono, who introduced herself and shook ...

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Take the lead and quit for the Great American Smokeout

Article
11/4/2015
Twenty-five percent of active duty service members smoke cigarettes compared to eighteen percent in the U.S. adult population. That’s not all that’s lagging. Besides serious long-term health effects, smoking cigarettes can slow down a service member by negatively affecting their endurance and how quickly they heal. (U.S. Air Force Photo Illustration by Staff Sgt. John Bainter)

Even with the importance of readiness and physical fitness to service members, the smoking rate is still higher than that of civilians

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Smoking poses major risks to women’s reproductive health

Article
10/23/2015
Women who smoke may have fertility issues, because smoking can affect their ability to conceive. It can also cause premature birth or low birth weights, certain birth defects, such as cleft pallets and complications with the placenta that passes nutrients from mother to child.

Besides the health risks to the lungs and heart, as well as the cancers it causes throughout the body, smoking poses some significant risks to women’s abilities to have babies.

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Quit Tobacco Public Service Announcement

Video
2/5/2015
Quit Tobacco Public Service Announcement

Do you suffer from too much stamina? Or feel you're not producing enough mucus? Then cigarettes may be right for you! Visit UCanQuit2.org to learn how to quit today.

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Operation Live Well | Tobacco-Free Living | Tobacco-Free Living
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