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Preventive Health

The Military Health System (MHS) is committed to the long-term health and vitality of our nation’s warfighters, their families, retirees, and civilians. Part of maintaining readiness is preventing the onset of diseases and injuries that pose a threat to the Defense community. 

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Don’t give flu a fighting chance; get the flu shot

Article
10/10/2017
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Gerich Curtom (left), administers a flu shot to Builder 2nd Class Charles Scheck at Naval Air Station North Island’s medical clinic. There are many different strains of flu virus, and they can often mutate quickly, presenting a challenge in keeping everyone healthy and maintaining optimal immunity, and making it necessary to get immunized annually. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Sean P. Lenahan)

Influenza presents a disease threat almost every year, and annual immunization continues to be the best way to avoid that threat

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Preventive Health | Immunizations | Immunization Healthcare | Influenza Seasonal

Repetition, intensity can build a ‘recipe for injury’ during workouts

Article
9/22/2017
Avoiding any sudden increases in activity level, duration, load, and intensity can help prevent overuse injuries. Injuries can also happen as a result of technique errors, such as poor form during strength training exercises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Robert Cloys)

Doing too much too soon, or too much of the same, can lead to overuse injuries but there are many ways people can prevent these injuries

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Physical Activity | Preventive Health | Operation Live Well

New school year, same risk: Don’t forget the sunscreen

Article
9/20/2017
Whether at recess or recreational sports, children and teens are exposed to UV rays and it’s important to protect their skin throughout the school year. Experts recommend re-applying sunscreen after an hour and a half – especially while playing sports outside or swimming. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Kristen Wong)

As children and teenagers return to school, experts remind parents to make sunscreen application part of their daily routines throughout the school year

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Preventive Health | Children's Health | Operation Live Well

Getting ZZZZs: Military sleep clinics keep troops on their toes by shutting their eyes

Article
9/19/2017
An Airman is hooked up to wires and a continuous positive air pressure mask in the 673d Medical Group Sleep Disorder Clinic at the Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson Hospital, Alaska. The equipment monitors a patient's brain function, heart rate, temperature, breath, and movement. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Christopher R. Morales)

Sleep is an important preventive health tool, and military sleep clinics help patients get the shut-eye they need

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Preventive Health | Sleep | Operation Live Well

The positive impact of preventive health

Article
8/22/2017
Col. Andrew Wiesen, director of preventive health for the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, talks about the role of preventive health and good health habits in improving length and quality of life. (Photo courtesy of Col. Andrew Wiesen)

Daily healthy habits help bodies fight illness, disease, and injury, and they are essential for the health readiness of service members. During Preventive Health Month, the Military Health System encourages everyone to remember the impact of preventive services and good habits on overall health.

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Preventive Health

Vaccinations: Important part of back-to-school checklist

Article
8/16/2017
Air Force Senior Airman Antoinette Fowler shows a 4-year-old how to give a vaccination during a teddy bear clinic at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. The event taught children about the importance of vaccination and immunization. Getting necessary vaccinations now is as much a rite of going back to school as picking up pencils and paper for the first day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ilka Cole)

Making sure children have all their vaccinations before going back to school is as important as making sure they have the right supplies

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Preventive Health | Children's Health

Pumping on the job is worth any hassles, breast-feeding moms say

Article
8/3/2017
Navy Lt. Alea DePauw (left) with Ethan, 6 months, and Lt. Cmdr. Melissa Rosloniec (right) with Jack, 10 months, pump when they work at Naval Medical Center San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Elizabeth Merriam)

August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week, an annual global campaign to promote the benefits of nursing; this year marks the 25th annual event, which is recognized in more than 170 countries

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Preventive Health | Children's Health

Immunizations provide the ounce of prevention delivering the pound of cure

Article
8/1/2017
Air Force Col. Tonya Rans, chief, Immunization Healthcare Branch, Defense Health Agency.

Air Force Col. Tonya Rans, chief, Immunization Healthcare Branch at the Defense Health Agency, explains how vaccinations are an important preventive health tool.

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Preventive Health | Immunization Healthcare

One size no longer fits all: MHS’ approach to individualized medicine

Article
7/7/2017
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and member of Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences Board of Regents, provided the opening remarks at the recent Precision Medicine Research Conference in Potomac, Maryland. (Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences photo)

Military Health System experts discussed the importance of individualized approach to prevention and treatment, and the need for MHS and Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences to pave the way

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Preventive Health | Medical Research and Development

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
6/19/2017
Did you know  … ? In 2016, essential hypertension accounted for 52,586 encounters for health care among 29,612 active component service members in the U.S. Armed Forces. Of all cardiovascular diseases, essential hypertension is by far the most common specific condition diagnosed among active duty service members. Untreated hypertension increases the risks of subsequent ischemic heart disease (heart attack), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), and kidney failure. CHART: Healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016 Major condition: •	For all other cardiovascular the number of medical encounters was 70,781, Rank 29, number of individuals affected was 35,794 with a rank of 30. The number of bed days was 4,285 with a rank of 21. •	For essential hypertension the number of medical encounters was 52,586, rank 35, number of individuals affected was 29,612 with a rank of 35. The number of bed days was 151 with a rank of 86. •	For cerebrovascular disease the number of medical encounters was 7,772, rank 79, number of individuals affected was 1,708, with a rank of 96. The number of bed days was 2,107 with a rank of 32. •	For ischemic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 6,629, rank 83, number of individuals affected 2,399 with a rank of 87. The number of bed days was 1,140 with a rank of 42. •	For inflammatory the number of medical encounters was 2,221, rank 106, number of individuals affected 1,302 with a rank of 97. The number of bed days was 297 with a rank of 72. •	For rheumatic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 319, rank 125, number of individuals affected 261, with a rank of 121. The number of bed days was 2 with a rank of 133. Learn more about healthcare burdens attributable to various diseases and injuries by visiting Health.mil/MSMRArchives. #LoveYourHeart Infogaphic graphic features transparent graphic of a man’s heart illuminated within his chest.

This infographic documents healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases among active component, U.S. Armed Forces in 2016.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Preventive Health | Men's Health | Heart Health

Protect your back during your PCS

Article
5/22/2017
Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix. So be mindful of how you’re lifting and moving while you’re packing up and loading up. (U.S. Navy photo)

Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix

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Human Performance Resource Center | Preventive Health

Avoid sitting disease

Article
2/14/2017
A DHHQ employee bikes to work. Bike or walk to work, if possible. If you don’t live close enough to bike or walk the entire commute, try walking for at least part of your travel time. For example, park further from your building. Or choose a higher level in the parking garage. (Courtesy photo)

The more time you spend sitting, the greater your risk of disease

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Preventive Health | Physical Activity | Human Performance Resource Center

Proper dental care can prevent disease

Article
2/1/2017
Navy Lt. Michelle Romeo teaches a first-grade student proper brushing techniques during  Dental Health Month at Graham A. Barden Elementary School in Havelock N.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Grace L. Waladkewics)

More than fighting bad breath or preventing gingivitis, research shows that dental health also contributes to the overall well-being of people

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Preventive Health | Health Readiness | Dental Care

One Health concept highlights collaboration as key

Article
1/24/2017
Given its nature and the potential for pandemics, flu is of particular concern regarding Force Health Protection and global health. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Esteven Baca, from the immunizations department at Naval Hospital Pensacola, administers a flu shot to Lt. Alison Malloy, Staff Judge Advocate for the Center for Information Warfare Training. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Taylor L. Jackson)

Experts, including those at the Defense Health Agency’s Public Health Division, are integrating human medicine, animal health and environmental science to prevent and treat the flu, as well as other serious public health threats

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Global Health Engagement | Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Veterinary Service | Public Health

Cervical cancer: What women need to know

Article
1/23/2017
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The routine practice of Pap smears has reduced cervical cancer from the number one killer of women in the first half of the 20th century to a mild, treatable condition which rarely progresses

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Women's Health | Preventive Health
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