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Preventive Health

The Military Health System (MHS) is committed to the long-term health and vitality of our nation’s warfighters, their families, retirees, and civilians. Part of maintaining readiness is preventing the onset of diseases and injuries that pose a threat to the Defense community. 

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One size no longer fits all: MHS’ approach to individualized medicine

Article
7/7/2017
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and member of Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences Board of Regents, provided the opening remarks at the recent Precision Medicine Research Conference in Potomac, Maryland. (Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences photo)

Military Health System experts discussed the importance of individualized approach to prevention and treatment, and the need for MHS and Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences to pave the way

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Preventive Health | Medical Research and Development

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
6/19/2017
Did you know  … ? In 2016, essential hypertension accounted for 52,586 encounters for health care among 29,612 active component service members in the U.S. Armed Forces. Of all cardiovascular diseases, essential hypertension is by far the most common specific condition diagnosed among active duty service members. Untreated hypertension increases the risks of subsequent ischemic heart disease (heart attack), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), and kidney failure. CHART: Healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016 Major condition: •	For all other cardiovascular the number of medical encounters was 70,781, Rank 29, number of individuals affected was 35,794 with a rank of 30. The number of bed days was 4,285 with a rank of 21. •	For essential hypertension the number of medical encounters was 52,586, rank 35, number of individuals affected was 29,612 with a rank of 35. The number of bed days was 151 with a rank of 86. •	For cerebrovascular disease the number of medical encounters was 7,772, rank 79, number of individuals affected was 1,708, with a rank of 96. The number of bed days was 2,107 with a rank of 32. •	For ischemic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 6,629, rank 83, number of individuals affected 2,399 with a rank of 87. The number of bed days was 1,140 with a rank of 42. •	For inflammatory the number of medical encounters was 2,221, rank 106, number of individuals affected 1,302 with a rank of 97. The number of bed days was 297 with a rank of 72. •	For rheumatic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 319, rank 125, number of individuals affected 261, with a rank of 121. The number of bed days was 2 with a rank of 133. Learn more about healthcare burdens attributable to various diseases and injuries by visiting Health.mil/MSMRArchives. #LoveYourHeart Infogaphic graphic features transparent graphic of a man’s heart illuminated within his chest.

This infographic documents healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases among active component, U.S. Armed Forces in 2016.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Preventive Health | Men's Health | Heart Health

Protect your back during your PCS

Article
5/22/2017
Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix. So be mindful of how you’re lifting and moving while you’re packing up and loading up. (U.S. Navy photo)

Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix

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Human Performance Resource Center | Preventive Health

Avoid sitting disease

Article
2/14/2017
A DHHQ employee bikes to work. Bike or walk to work, if possible. If you don’t live close enough to bike or walk the entire commute, try walking for at least part of your travel time. For example, park further from your building. Or choose a higher level in the parking garage. (Courtesy photo)

The more time you spend sitting, the greater your risk of disease

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Preventive Health | Physical Activity | Human Performance Resource Center

Proper dental care can prevent disease

Article
2/1/2017
Navy Lt. Michelle Romeo teaches a first-grade student proper brushing techniques during  Dental Health Month at Graham A. Barden Elementary School in Havelock N.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Grace L. Waladkewics)

More than fighting bad breath or preventing gingivitis, research shows that dental health also contributes to the overall well-being of people

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Preventive Health | Health Readiness | Dental Care

One Health concept highlights collaboration as key

Article
1/24/2017
Given its nature and the potential for pandemics, flu is of particular concern regarding Force Health Protection and global health. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Esteven Baca, from the immunizations department at Naval Hospital Pensacola, administers a flu shot to Lt. Alison Malloy, Staff Judge Advocate for the Center for Information Warfare Training. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Taylor L. Jackson)

Experts, including those at the Defense Health Agency’s Public Health Division, are integrating human medicine, animal health and environmental science to prevent and treat the flu, as well as other serious public health threats

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Global Health Engagement | Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Veterinary Service | Public Health

Cervical cancer: What women need to know

Article
1/23/2017
Army Medicine Logo

The routine practice of Pap smears has reduced cervical cancer from the number one killer of women in the first half of the 20th century to a mild, treatable condition which rarely progresses

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Women's Health | Preventive Health

Preventive Services for Standard Beneficiaries

Video
1/6/2017
Preventive Services for Standard Beneficiaries

This TRICARE TV Episode discusses TRICARE's preventive health benefits for TRICARE Standard Beneficiaries.

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Operation Live Well | Integrative Wellness | Heart Health | Immunizations | Men's Health | Children's Health | TRICARE Health Program | Preventive Health | Women's Health

Preventive Services for Prime Beneficiaries

Video
1/3/2017
Preventive Services for Prime Beneficiaries

This TRICARE TV Episode discusses TRICARE's preventive health benefits for TRICARE Prime Beneficiaries.

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Operation Live Well | Integrative Wellness | Heart Health | Immunizations | Men's Health | Children's Health | TRICARE Health Program | Preventive Health | Women's Health

Recently approved cholera vaccine available for use in the U.S.

Article
12/29/2016
Cholera vaccinations via injection were routine for service members. Now, An FDA-approved vaccine is available for use in the United States for travelers going to cholera-affected areas. Vaxchora, which received its FDA license in 2016, is a single dose oral vaccine that contains live attenuated cholera bacteria. Cholera is a disease that is often transmitted through contaminated food or water. (U.S. Army Photo by Dustin Senger)

Cholera, a disease often found in contaminated food and water, affects an estimated five million people a year around the world. Now a vaccine to help protect against the disease is available to U.S. travelers going to cholera-affected areas.

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Immunization Healthcare | Cholera | Preventive Health | Immunizations

MHS year in review: A look into malaria research

Article
12/27/2016
The antimalarial medication Malarone was issued to service members deployed to West Africa in support of Operation United Assistance (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. V. Michelle Woods)

With two vaccines and an antimalarial drug set to begin clinical trials next year, Walter Reed Institute of Research looks back on its work in malaria research over the past year.

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Preventive Health | Research and Innovation

Military and civilian experts came together at AMSUS to share practices in providing best care possible

Article
12/9/2016
Boris Lushniak, department chair for the department of preventive medicine and biostatistics at Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, spoke about raising the bar for preventive medicine at AMSUS (The Society of Federal Health Professionals) 2016 in National Harbor, near Washington D.C.

Experts across MHS come together to discuss ways to move forward in providing best clinical care possible

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Preventive Health

Year in Review: MHS stepped up measures against antibiotic resistant bacteria

Article
12/6/2016
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan saw a rise in antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. In 2016 the Military Health System stepped up efforts to identify and study such bacteria and share information gathered with the larger health-care community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Christopher Stewart)

If the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues unchecked, we will be at a point where we really don’t have antibiotics to treat simple things

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Health Readiness | Public Health | Preventive Health | Research and Innovation

Proper nutrition can help manage diabetes

Article
11/21/2016
A Soldier performs a glucose screening. A person diagnosed with diabetes is lacking insulin or is insulin resistant so that the body can’t process sugars normally. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jessica A DuVernay)

Good nutrition is important for any healthy lifestyle, but for diabetics balancing nutrition, activity and medication is vital

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Conditions and Treatments | Nutrition | Preventive Health

Lung cancer screening saves lives

Article
11/17/2016
A patient at Naval Hospital Pensacola prepares to have a low-dose computed tomography test done to screen for lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women. Early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women

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Conditions and Treatments | Preventive Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics
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