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Men's Health

Getting the most out of life requires a commitment to attitudes that foster healthy lifestyle choices. While men and women have many of the same health concerns, men may be affected differently than women. In addition, there are some conditions which are unique to men. Familiarity with men’s health issues, regular screenings and prevention are keys to maintaining good physical wellness.

Heart Disease

Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death for men in the United States. The most common type of heart disease in the United States is coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is a narrowing of the small blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart. When a heart attack occurs, blood flow to the heart is reduced or cut off.

The warning signs of a heart attack in men vary slightly from women. Chest pain is a classic male heart attack symptom which may last for more than a few minutes or, it can come and go.

Other signs to be aware of include: discomfort or pain in other areas, such as one or both arms, the back, neck or jaw; shortness of breath, lightheadedness, nausea or sweating; abdominal discomfort that may feel like indigestion

Ideally, treatments to restore blood flow to heart muscle, for example, clot-dissolving drugs or angioplasty, should begin within one hour after heart attack symptoms begin.

Some men are more at risk than others for developing heart disease. In addition to hereditary, other risk factors are high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, smoking, substance abuse, high cholesterol and lifestyle may play a role.

Preventative measures can lower the chances of having heart disease. Before undertaking any program to improve cardiovascular health, see a medical doctor. A physician may suggest a plan that includes eating certain foods, specific exercises and appropriate ways to reduce stress.

Prostate Cancer

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. According to Cancer.gov, prostate cancer the most common cancer in men in the United States, after skin cancer. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, being African-American and some genetic changes.

Symptoms of prostate cancer may include: Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling; low back pain; pain with ejaculation

Doctors diagnose prostate cancer by feeling the prostate through the wall of the rectum or doing a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Other tests include ultrasound, X-rays or a biopsy.

Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy and chemotherapy. A combination of treatments may be used.

Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is also called colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is cancer that starts in the colon or rectum. The colon and rectum are parts of the large intestine, the lower part of the body's digestive system. According to Cancer.gov, colon cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Caught early, it is often curable.

Colon cancer is more common in people over 50, and the risk increases with age. A person is also more likely to get it if they have polyps (growths inside the colon and rectum that may become cancerous), a diet that is high in fat, a family history or personal history of colorectal cancer or ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease.

Deaths from colorectal cancer have decreased with the use of colonoscopies and fecal occult blood tests, which check for blood in the stool.


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