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Summer Safety

Summer Safety Campaign ImageSummer is the season for relaxing, having fun and spending time with your family and friends.

  • When spending time outside, it’s important to protect your skin and eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet rays.
  • When preparing food on a grill – such as the healthy recipes from Operation Live Well’s Grill and Chill cookbook -- always follow the grill manufacturer’s instructions and proper food safety procedures.
  • Summertime is a prime time for use of motorcycles and bikes. Remember to wear a helmet and follow basic biker safety instructions.
  • Independence Day celebrations and outdoor parties are an enjoyable part of the summer. Make sure to drink alcoholic beverages responsibly and never let anyone drink and drive.

Resources & Links

American Red Cross

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Federal Emergency Management Agency

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center

U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center

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Military vision experts warn of dangers of improper solar eclipse viewing

Article
8/18/2017
A member of the South Carolina National Guard tests her solar eclipse safety glasses. The glasses were distributed by the South Carolina National Guard Safety Office in preparation for the solar eclipse that will occur August 21, 2017. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Chelsea Baker)

On August 21, 2017, millions of Americans will turn their eyes to the sky to witness one of the most amazing phenomena: a total solar eclipse

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Summer Safety

Sight safety for solar eclipse viewing

Article
8/9/2017
There is only one safe way to look directly at the sun, whether during an eclipse or not and that is with special-purpose solar filters. These solar filters are used in “eclipse glasses” or in hand-held solar viewers. They must meet a very specific worldwide standard known as ISO 12312-2. (U.S. Army photo by Mark Rankin)

Staring at the sun during the total eclipse for even a short time without wearing the right eye protection can permanently damage the retina

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Summer Safety | Vision Loss

Small critters, big consequences: be mindful of tick-borne diseases

Article
7/21/2017
Tick bites and associated illnesses can be prevented, experts warn

Infections from ticks are on the rise, but they can be prevented. Knowing what the local risks are, such as Lyme disease or Powassan, and taking steps to minimize exposure can help.

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Summer Safety

Heat Illness Prevention: Use the Buddy System to Stay Cool and Safe

Infographic
7/20/2017
Did you know that exposure to heat and heat-related illnesses can cause a spectrum of disorders that includes minor conditions such as heat cramps to the more severe condition known as heat stroke? To protect U.S. service members, it is important for commanders, small unit leaders, training cadre, and supporting medical personnel to encourage the use of the buddy system to prevent these conditions – especially during training at recruit centers and installations. The buddy system pairs service members to stay motivated and hold each other accountable of their physical limits during training exercises. Protecting Service Members from Heat Illness •	Do not exercise when sick. Intense workouts can increase susceptibility to illness, including infection and diarrhea. •	Dump heat by taking a cold shower or ice slush immersion before a workout. •	Wear a cooling vest to keep skin cool and dry in the heat. Learn more about heat illness prevention at Health.mil/AFHSB Stay cool. Stay hydrated. Stay informed. #BeatTheHeat Source: Dr. Francis G. O’Connor, a professor and chair of Military and Emergency Medicine and associate director for the Consortium on Health and Military Performance at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

This infographic documents the use of the buddy system to prevent heat-related illnesses.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Summer Safety

Preventable and Treatable: Know the Signs of Heat Exhaustion

Infographic
7/20/2017
Warmer temperatures and strenuous physical activity put service members at higher risk of heat illnesses. It is important for commanders, small unit leaders, training cadre, and supporting medical personnel – particularly at recruit training centers and installations with large combat troop populations – to educate service members about the risks early signs and symptoms, and preventive treatment measures related to heat illnesses. Signs of Dehydration •	Light-headed/ Dizzy/ Headache •	Fever •	Lack of sweat •	Dark yellow urine •	Thirst Under the signs of dehydration section an image of a man experiencing these early signs and symptoms of heat illnesses. Staying Hydrated •	Hydrate with water and eat rich foods with water before, during, and after exercise. •	Decrease the intensity of the physical activity. Under the staying hydrated section graphics of a water bottle, glass of water, runner and cyclist appear. Signs of Heat Stroke •	Fatigue •	Combative •	Confused •	Muscle cramps Under the signs of heat stroke section, a man experiencing these symptoms of heat stroke displays. Effective Ways to Cool Off a Heat Stroke Victim •	Make an “ice burrito” by wrapping the victim in cold sheets, ice packs, and wet towels •	Immerse victim in cold water Images of ice and a man under a shower appear.  Ways to Treat Heat Exhaustion •	Use a rectal thermostat to read core body temperatures to diagnose and treat heat stroke •	Provide IV fluid replacement •	Spray with cool mist Image of rectal thermostat, man in a hospital bed with an IV and a man being sprayed with cool mist appear. Learn more about heat illness by reading MSMR Vol. 24 No. 3 – March 2017 at Health.mil/MSMR Source: Dr. Francis FG. O’Connor, a professor and chair of Military and Emergency Medicine and associate director for the Consortium on Health and Military Performance at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

This infographic documents the risks, early signs and symptoms, and preventive treatment measures related to heat illnesses.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Summer Safety

Exertional heat injuries pose annual threat to U.S. service members

Article
7/20/2017
Two U.S. service members perform duties in warm weather where they may be exposed to extreme heat conditions and a higher risk of heat illness.

Exertional heat injuries pose annual threat to U.S. service members, according to a study published in Defense Health Agency’s Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) peer-reviewed journal, the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report.

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Summer sun safety

Article
7/12/2017
We all love being in the sun. But being in the sum means it's time to revisit smart practices to protect you, your family and especially your children from exposure to the sun and its ultraviolet rays. (U.S. Army photo by Ronald Wolf)

Although anyone of any skin color has some risk for skin cancer, some individuals are at much higher risk

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Summer Safety

Sweltering ‘dog days’ of summer are no walk in the park for household pets

Article
7/11/2017
Dogs like Jade, shown relaxing in the shade in Emerald Isle, North Carolina, are more vulnerable than cats to heat hazards because they usually spend more time outside with their owners.

Heat and other summertime risks for pets

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Keep an eye on your pets this Fourth of July

Article
6/28/2017
People watch fireworks during a 2016 Fourth of July celebration at a park near Incirlik Air Base, Turkey. Fireworks and barbecues may be fun ways for people to celebrate the Fourth of July, but they’re no picnic for household pets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Devin Rumbaugh)

Fireworks and barbecues may be fun ways for people to celebrate the Fourth of July, but they’re no picnic for household pets

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Don't let the bugs bite

Article
6/1/2017
Using an insect repellent spray can be an important measure in guarding against bites from fleas, ticks and mosquitoes this summer.

Most parents do a good job of protecting their kids from the sun, but they also need to consider why it's important to guard against potentially harmful insect bites and stings

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Summertime food safety

Article
5/30/2017
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. To avoid this, follow good cooking tips. Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The CDC estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses

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Summer Safety | Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Accidental Drownings Among U.S. Service Members

Infographic
5/25/2017
Military members are at risk for unintentional drownings during training, occupational activities and off-duty recreation. Increase your awareness today to lower your risks: Drowning prevention: Water-related recreational activities in or near water can be potentially dangerous – particularly for non-swimmers and weak swimmers – in hazardous conditions and settings (e.g., storms, currents, riptides), and when safety measures are not observed. Military members are at risk for unintentional drownings during training, occupational activities and off-duty recreation. Here are four ways you can prevent unintentional drowning: •	Wear life jackets. •	Take swim lessons to become a stronger swimmer. •	Swim with a buddy; never swim alone. •	Be knowledgeable of water environments you are in. Increase your awareness and lower your risks by reading the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) Vol. 22 No. 6 – June 2015 report “Update: Accidental drownings, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005 – 2014 at www.Health.mil/MSMR  #SwimSafe Follow us on Twitter for more information at AFHSBPAGE. Also check out hashtag #SwimSafe. Source: Defense Health Agency, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. Graphic shows: •	Man swimming in pool •	Mom with three children swimming in pool. •	Woman swimming in pool

Military members are at risk for unintentional drownings during training, occupational activities and off-duty recreation. This infographic provides swim safety information to help increase awareness and lower the risks of accidental drownings among service members.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Summer Safety

Preserving the Force

Policy

A message from the Secretary of Defense about summer safety

  • Identification #: N/A
  • Date: 4/17/2017
  • Type: Memorandums
  • Topics: Summer Safety

Update: Heat Illness Active Component U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Heat illness refers to a spectrum of disorders that occur when the body is unable to dissipate heat absorbed from the external environment and the heat generated by internal metabolic processes. As heat illness progresses, failure of one or more body systems can occur. This infographic provides an update on heat illness among active component U.S. Armed Forces during 2016. There were 401 incident cases of heat stroke and 2,135 incident cases of other heat illness among active component service members. The annual incidence rate of cases of heat stroke in 2016 was slightly lower than the rate in 2015. There were fewer heat-stroke-related ambulatory visits and more reportable events in 2016 than in 2015. ‘Other heat illness’ was slightly higher in 2016 than in 2015. High risk of heat stroke in 2016 included males, service members aged 19 years or younger, Asian/Pacific Islanders, Recruit Trainees, Combat-specific occupations, Marine Corps and Army members. To learn more about the significant threat of heat illnesses to both the health of U.S. military members and the effectiveness of military operations, visit www.Health.mil/MSMR

Heat illness refers to a spectrum of disorders that occur when the body is unable to dissipate heat absorbed from the external environment and the heat generated by internal metabolic processes. As heat illness progresses, failure of one or more body systems can occur. This infographic provides an update on heat illness among active component U.S. ...

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Summer Safety

Minority Health Heat Illness Active Component U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Heat illness refers to a spectrum of disorders that occur when the body is unable to dissipate heat absorbed from the external environment and the heat generated by internal metabolic processes. As heat illness progresses, failure of one or more body systems can occur. This report summarizes reportable medical events of heat illnesses, heat-related hospitalizations and ambulatory visits among minority active component members (Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islanders) during 2016. In 2016, incidence rates of heat stroke were highest among Asian/ Pacific Islanders than any other ethnicity. Crude incidence rate of “other heat illnesses” was higher among females than males.  Heat Incidence cases: •	Black, non-Hispanic heat illness incidence cases – 64 for heatstroke and 389 for other heat illnesses •	Hispanic heat illness incidence cases—  63 for heatstroke and 320 for other heat illnesses •	Asian/ Pacific Islander heat illness incidence cases – 32 for heatstroke and for  117 other heat illnesses Incidence rates: •	Black, non-Hispanic incidence rates – 0.30 for heatstroke and 1.84 for other heat illnesses •	Hispanic incidence rates – 0.33 for heatstroke and 1.67 for other heat illnesses •	Asian/Pacific Islander – 0.62 for heatstroke and 2.26 for other heat illnesses Of all military members, the youngest and most inexperienced marines and soldiers – particularly those training at installations in the south eastern U.S. – are at highest risk of heat illnesses including heat stroke, exertional hyponatremia, and exertional rhabdomyolysis. Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR

Heat illness refers to a spectrum of disorders that occur when the body is unable to dissipate heat absorbed from the external environment and the heat generated by internal metabolic processes. As heat illness progresses, failure of one or more body systems can occur. This report summarizes reportable medical events of heat illnesses, heat-related ...

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Summer Safety
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