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Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool

Welcome to the Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool (MSIT). Military Health System (MHS) data are used by Department of Defense, Veterans Administration, and academic health professionals and scientists to implement health care studies. These studies reflect the MHS interest to rigorously assess and improve our beneficiaries’ access to the high quality health care services they need. Additionally, these studies are frequently used to develop or improve MHS policy and often adopt useful, relevant comparisons to the national health care experience.

The MSIT allows easy review of recent studies that are either conducted or sponsored by the MHS, or accomplished using datasets developed or maintained by the Defense Health Agency for administrative, operational, or research purposes. The studies within this website represent important contributions of the MHS to the national health care dialogue and reflect our capacity to tackle the challenging issues needed to support evidence-informed health policy. Thank you for your interest in them.

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Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

Study

Abstract

The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2014
  • Citation: Bedno S, Hauret K, Loringer K, Kao TC, Mallon T, Jones B. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel. Mil Med. 2014 Nov;179(11):1311-8.

Mental health among a nationally representative sample of United States Military Reserve Component Personnel.

Study

Abstract

PURPOSE: Estimate prevalence of lifetime, current year, and current month depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among US military reservists. METHODS: Structured interviews were performed with a nationally representative military reserve sample (n = 2,003). Sociodemographic characteristics, military experiences, lifetime stressors, and psychiatric conditions were assessed. Depression was measured with the PHQ-9, and PTSD (deployment and non-deployment related) was assessed with the PCL-C. RESULTS: Depression (21.63 % lifetime, 14.31 % current year, and 5.99 % current month) was more common than either deployment-related PTSD (5.49 % lifetime, 4.98 % current year, and 3.62 % current month) or non-deployment-related PTSD (5.40 % lifetime, 3.91 % current year, and 2.32 % current month), and branch-related differences were found. Non-deployment-related trauma was associated with non-deployment-related PTSD and depression in a dose-response fashion; deployment-related trauma was associated with deployment-related PTSD and depression in a dose-response fashion. CONCLUSIONS: The study reveals notable differences in PTSD and depression prevalence by service branch that may be attributable to a combination of factors including greater lifetime trauma exposures and differing operational military experiences. Our findings suggest that service branch and organizational differences are related to key protective and/or risk factors, which may prove useful in guiding prevention and treatment efforts among reservists.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2014
  • Citation: Russell DW, Cohen GH, Gifford R, Fullerton CS, Ursano RJ, Galea S. Mental health among a nationally representative sample of United States Military Reserve Component Personnel. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2014 Nov 25.
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