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Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool

Welcome to the Military Health System Studies Inventory Tool (MSIT). Military Health System (MHS) data are used by Department of Defense, Veterans Administration, and academic health professionals and scientists to implement health care studies. These studies reflect the MHS interest to rigorously assess and improve our beneficiaries’ access to the high quality health care services they need. Additionally, these studies are frequently used to develop or improve MHS policy and often adopt useful, relevant comparisons to the national health care experience.

The MSIT allows easy review of recent studies that are either conducted or sponsored by the MHS, or accomplished using datasets developed or maintained by the Defense Health Agency for administrative, operational, or research purposes. The studies within this website represent important contributions of the MHS to the national health care dialogue and reflect our capacity to tackle the challenging issues needed to support evidence-informed health policy. Thank you for your interest in them.

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Combat-Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Their Relative Associations With Postdeployment Binge Drinking.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether experiencing a traumatic brain injury (TBI) on a recent combat deployment was associated with postdeployment binge drinking, independent of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). METHODS: Using the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel, an anonymous survey completed by 28 546 personnel, the study sample included 6824 personnel who had a combat deployment in the past year. Path analysis was used to examine whether PTSD accounted for the total association between TBI and binge drinking. MAIN MEASURES: The dependent variable, binge drinking days, was an ordinal measure capturing the number of times personnel drank 5+ drinks on one occasion (4+ for women) in the past month. Traumatic brain injury level captured the severity of TBI after a combat injury event exposure: TBI-AC (altered consciousness only), TBI-LOC of 20 or less (loss of consciousness up to 20 minutes), and TBI-LOC of more than 20 (loss of consciousness >20 minutes). A PTSD-positive screen relied on the standard diagnostic cutoff of 50+ on the PTSD Checklist-Civilian. RESULTS: The final path model found that while the direct effect of TBI (0.097) on binge drinking was smaller than that of PTSD (0.156), both were significant. Almost 70% of the total effect of TBI on binge drinking was from the direct effect; only 30% represented the indirect effect through PTSD. CONCLUSION: Further research is needed to replicate these findings and to understand the underlying mechanisms that explain the relationship between TBI and increased postdeployment drinking.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federal government department, agency, or organization, other than the Department of Defense
  • Release Date/Publication: January 01, 2016
  • Citation: Adams RS, Larson MJ, Corrigan JD, Ritter GA, Horgan CM, et.al., Combat-Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Their Relative Associations With Postdeployment Binge Drinking. J Head Trauma Rehabil. 2016 Jan-Feb;31(1):13-22.

Durations of service until first and recurrent episodes of clinically significant back pain, active component military members: changes among new accessions to service since calendar year 2000.

Study

Abstract

This report summarizes frequencies and timing of first and recurrent episodes of back pain treated in the U.S. Military Health System among more than 2 million military members who began active service between July 2000 and June 2012. In the population overall, at least 5% were affected by clinically significant back pain within 6 months and 10% within 13 months of beginning active service; and 34% had at least one episode of back pain while in active service during the surveillance period. After initial episodes of back pain, more than half (54%) of those affected had at least one recurrent episode; and after first recurrences, 65% had second recurrences while still in active service. In general, back pain episode-free periods preceding initial and between successive episodes markedly decreased during the period. Frequencies and timing of back pain episodes varied in relation to service branch, gender, and occupation. Acute back pain is a common disorder that is unpredictable in onset and often debilitating. Its prevention should be a military medical research objective of high priority.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: January 01, 2016
  • Citation: Brundage JF, Hu Z, Clark LL. Durations of service until first and recurrent episodes of clinically significant back pain, active component military members: changes among new accessions to service since calendar year 2000. MSMR. 2016 Jan;23(1):7-15.

VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD extremity injury outcomes collaboration.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limb injuries comprise 50-60% of U.S. Service member's casualties of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Combat-related vascular injuries are present in 12% of this cohort, a rate 5 times higher than in prior wars. Improvements in medical and surgical trauma care, including initial in-theatre limb salvage approaches (IILS) have resulted in improved survival and fewer amputations, however, the long-term outcomes such as morbidity, functional decline, and risk for late amputation of salvaged limbs using current process of care have not been studied. The long-term care of these injured warfighters poses a significant challenge to the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). METHODS/DESIGN: The VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD Extremity Injury Outcomes Collaborative, funded by the VA, Health Services Research and Development Service, is a longitudinal cohort study of Veterans with vascular extremity injuries. Enrollment will begin April, 2015 and continue for 3 years. Individuals with a validated extremity vascular injury in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry will be contacted and will complete a set of validated demographic, social, behavioral, and functional status measures during interview and online/ mailed survey. Primary outcome measures will: 1) Compare injury, demographic and geospatial characteristics of patients with IILS and identify late vascular surgery related limb complications and health care utilization in Veterans receiving VA vs. non-VA care, 2) Characterize the preventive services received by individuals with vascular repair and related outcomes, and 3) Describe patient-reported functional outcomes in Veterans with traumatic vascular limb injuries. DISCUSSION: This study will provide key information about the current process of care for Active Duty Service members and Veterans with polytrauma/vascular injuries at risk for persistent morbidity and late amputation. The results of this study will be the first step for clinicians in VA and military settings to generate evidence-based treatment and care approaches to these injuries. It will identify areas where rehabilitation medicine and vascular specialty care or telehealth options are needed to allow for better planning, resource utilization, and improved DoD-to-VA care transitions.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Government, academic, or industry source other than Federal Government
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2015
  • Citation: Shireman PK, Rasmussen TE, Jaramillo CA, Pugh MJ. VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD extremity injury outcomes collaboration. BMC Surg. 2015 Feb 3;15:13. doi: 10.1186/1471-2482-15-13.

Using base rates of low scores to interpret the ANAM4 TBI-MIL battery following mild traumatic brain injury.

Study

Abstract

Base rates of low ANAM4 TBI-MIL scores were calculated in a convenience sample of 733 healthy male active duty soldiers using available military reference values for the following cutoffs: ≤2nd percentile (2 SDs), ≤5th percentile, <10th percentile, and <16th percentile (1 SD). Rates of low scores were also calculated in 56 active duty male soldiers who sustained an mTBI an average of 23 days (SD = 36.1) prior. 22.0% of the healthy sample and 51.8% of the mTBI sample had two or more scores below 1 SD (i.e., 16th percentile). 18.8% of the healthy sample and 44.6% of the mTBI sample had one or more scores ≤5th percentile. Rates of low scores in the healthy sample were influenced by cutoffs and race/ethnicity. Importantly, some healthy soldiers obtain at least one low score on ANAM4. These base rate analyses can improve the methodology for interpreting ANAM4 performance in clinical practice and research.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2015
  • Citation: Ivins BJ, Lange RT, Cole WR, Kane R, Schwab KA, Iverson GL. Using base rates of low scores to interpret the ANAM4 TBI-MIL battery following mild traumatic brain injury. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2015 Feb;30(1):26-38.

Overweight and obesity trends among active duty military personnel: a 13-year perspective.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The U.S. population has shown increasing rates of overweight and obesity in recent years, but similar analyses do not exist for U.S. military personnel. It is important to understand these patterns in the military because of their impact on fitness and readiness. PURPOSE: To assess prevalence and trends in overweight/obesity among U.S. service members and to examine the associations of sociodemographic characteristics, exercise, depression, and substance use with these patterns. METHODS: Analyses performed in 2013 used five large population-based health-related behavior surveys conducted from 1995 to 2008. Main outcome measures were overweight and obesity among active duty military personnel based on BMI. RESULTS: Combined overweight and obesity (BMI≥25) increased from 50.6% in 1995 to 60.8% in 2008, primarily driven by the rise in obesity (BMI≥30) from 5.0% to 12.7%. For overweight, military women showed the largest increase. For obesity, all sociodemographic groups showed significant increases, with the largest among warrant officers, senior enlisted personnel, and people aged 36-45 years. Adjusted multinomial logit analyses found that service members aged 26 years and older, men, non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, enlisted personnel, married personnel, and heavy drinkers had the highest risk both for overweight and obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Combined overweight and obesity in active duty personnel rose to more than 60% between 1995 and 2008, primarily because of increased obesity. The high prevalence of overweight and obesity needs attention and has implications for Department of Defense efforts to improve the health, fitness, readiness, and quality of life of the Active Forces.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2015
  • Citation: Reyes-Guzman CM, Bray RM, Forman-Hoffman VL, Williams J. Overweight and obesity trends among active duty military personnel: a 13-year perspective. Am J Prev Med. 2015 Feb;48(2):145-53.

Deployment-related psychiatric and behavioral conditions and their association with functional disability in OEF/OIF/OND veterans.

Study

Abstract

Understanding the factors that influence veterans' functional outcome after deployment is critical to provide appropriately targeted care. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been related to disability, but other psychiatric and behavioral conditions are not as well examined. We investigated the impact of deployment-related psychiatric and behavioral conditions on disability among 255 OEF/OIF/OND service members and veterans. Structured clinical interviews assessed TBI and the psychiatric conditions of depression, PTSD, anxiety, and substance use. Self-report questionnaires assessed disability and the behavioral conditions of sleep disturbance and pain. Over 90% of participants had a psychiatric and/or behavioral condition, with approximately half presenting with ≥ 3 conditions. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 clinically relevant psychiatric and behavioral factors which accounted for 76.9% of the variance: (a) depression, PTSD, and military mTBI (deployment trauma factor); (b) pain and sleep (somatic factor); (c) anxiety disorders, other than PTSD (anxiety factor); and (d) substance abuse or dependence (substance use factor). Individuals with the conditions comprising the deployment trauma factor were more likely to be substantially disabled than individuals with depression and PTSD, but no military mTBI, OR = 3.52; 95% CI [1.09, 11.37]. Depression, PTSD, and a history of military mTBI may comprise an especially harmful combination associated with high risk for substantial disability.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: February 01, 2015
  • Citation: Lippa SM, Fonda JR, Fortier CB, Amick MA, Kenna A, Milberg WP, McGlinchey RE. Deployment-related psychiatric and behavioral conditions and their association with functional disability in OEF/OIF/OND veterans. J Trauma Stress. 2015 Feb;28(1):25-33.

Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated With Unwanted Sexual Contact Among U.S. Active Duty Service Women.

Study

Abstract

Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, or psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57-2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Government, academic, or industry source other than Federal Government
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Stahlman S, Javanbakht M, Cochran S, Hamilton AB, Shoptaw S, Gorbach PM. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated With Unwanted Sexual Contact Among U.S. Active Duty Service Women. J Trauma Stress. 2015 Jun;28(3):167-73.

Profile analyses of the Personality Assessment Inventory following military-related traumatic brain injury.

Study

Abstract

Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) profiles were examined in 160 U.S. service members (SMs) following mild-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants who sustained a mild TBI had significantly higher PAI scores than those with moderate-severe TBI on eight of the nine clinical scales examined. A two-step cluster analysis identified four PAI profiles, heuristically labeled "High Distress", "Moderate Distress", "Somatic Distress," and "No Distress". Postconcussive and posttraumatic stress symptom severity was highest for the High Distress group, followed by the Somatic and Moderate Distress groups, and the No Distress group. Profile groups differed in age, ethnicity, rank, and TBI severity. Findings indicate that meaningful patterns of behavioral and personality characteristics can be detected in active duty military SMs following TBI, which may prove useful in selecting the most efficacious rehabilitation strategies.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Kennedy JE, Cooper DB, Reid MW, Tate DF, Lange RT. Profile analyses of the Personality Assessment Inventory following military-related traumatic brain injury. Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2015 May;30(3):236-47.

Comparison of frequency of inflammatory bowel disease and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users versus nonusers.

Study

Abstract

Conflicting data exist regarding the effects of statin therapy on the prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases. We aimed to examine the association of statin therapy with diagnoses of inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis. This is a retrospective study using data of a military health care system from October 1, 2003, to March 1, 2012. Based on medication fills during fiscal year 2005, patients were divided into: (1) statin users (received at least 90-day supply of statin) and (2) nonusers (never received a statin). A propensity score-matched cohort of statin users and nonusers was created using 80 variables. Primary analysis examined the risks of being diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis between statin users and nonusers in the propensity score-matched cohort. Secondary analyses examined the risk of outcomes in the whole cohort and in patients with no comorbidities according to Charlson Comorbidity Index. Of 43,438 patients meeting study criteria (13,626 statin users and 29,812 nonusers), we propensity score matched 6,342 statin users with 6,342 nonusers. For our primary analysis, 93 statin users and 92 nonusers were diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases (odds ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval = 0.76 to 1.35), and 632 statin users and 619 nonusers were diagnosed of noninfectious gastroenteritis (odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.91 to 1.15). In conclusion, the risks of inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users and nonusers are similar after adjusting for other potential confounding factors.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Khalil D, Boktor M, Mortensen EM, Frei CR, Mansi I. Comparison of frequency of inflammatory bowel disease and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users versus nonusers. Am J Cardiol. 2015 May 15;115(10):1396-401.

Indirect associations of combat exposure with post-deployment physical symptoms in U.S. soldiers: roles of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and insomnia.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the indirect associations of combat exposure with post-deployment physical symptoms through shared associations with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and insomnia symptoms. METHODS: Surveys were administered to a sample of U.S. soldiers (N = 587) three months after a 15-month deployment to Iraq. A multiple indirect effects model was used to characterize direct and indirect associations between combat exposure and physical symptoms. RESULTS: Despite a zero-order correlation between combat exposure and physical symptoms, the multiple indirect effects analysis did not provide evidence of a direct association between these variables. Evidence for a significant indirect association of combat exposure and physical symptoms was observed through PTSD, depression, and insomnia symptoms. In fact, 92% of the total effect of combat exposure on physical symptoms scores was indirect. These findings were evident even after adjusting for the physical injury and relevant demographics. CONCLUSION: This is the first empirical study to suggest that PTSD, depression and insomnia collectively and independently contribute to the association between combat exposure and post-deployment physical symptoms. Limitations, future research directions, and potential policy implications are discussed.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Quartana PJ, Wilk JE, Balkin TJ, Hoge CW. Indirect associations of combat exposure with post-deployment physical symptoms in U.S. soldiers: roles of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and insomnia. J Psychosom Res. 2015 May;78(5):478-83.

Epidemiology of HIV among US Air Force Military Personnel, 1996-2011.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to describe the epidemiology of HIV in the United States Air Force (USAF) from 1996 through 2011 and to assess whether socio-demographic characteristics and service-related mobility, including military deployments, were associated with HIV infection. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of USAF personnel who were HIV-infected during the study period January 1, 1996 through December 31, 2011 and a matched case-control study. Cases were USAF personnel newly-diagnosed with HIV during the study period. Five randomly-selected HIV-uninfected controls were matched to each case by age, length of service, sex, race, service, component, and HIV test collection date. Socio-demographic and service-related mobility factors and HIV diagnosis were assessed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: During the study period, the USAF had 541 newly diagnosed HIV-infected cases. HIV incidence rate (per 100,000 person-years) among 473 active duty members was highest in 2007 (16.78), among black/ African-American USAF members (26.60) and those aged 25 to 29 years (10.84). In unadjusted analysis restricted to personnel on active duty, 10 characteristics were identified and considered for final multivariate analysis. Of these single (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 8.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.71-11.6) or other marital status (aOR 4.60, 95% CI 2.72-7.75), communications/ intelligence (aOR 2.57, 95% CI 1.84-3.60) or healthcare (aOR 2.07, 95% CI 1.28-3.35) occupations, and having no deployment in the past 2 years before diagnosis (aOR 2.02, 95% CI 1.47-2.78) conferred higher odds of HIV infection in adjusted analysis. CONCLUSION: The highest risk of HIV infection in the USAF was among young unmarried deployment-naïve males, especially those in higher risk occupation groups. In an era when worldwide military operations have increased, these analyses identified potential areas where targeted HIV prevention efforts may be beneficial in reducing HIV incidence in the USAF military population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Hakre S, Mydlarz DG, Dawson P, Danaher PJ, Gould PL, Witkop CT, Michael NL, Peel SA, Scott PT, Okulicz JF. Epidemiology of HIV among US Air Force Military Personnel, 1996-2011. PLoS One. 2015 May 11;10(5):

Early acute kidney injury in military casualties.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: While acute kidney injury (AKI) has been well studied in a variety of patient settings, there is a paucity of data in patients injured in the course of the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. We sought to establish the rate of early AKI in this population and to define risk factors for its development. METHODS: We combined the results of two studies performed at combat support hospitals in Afghanistan. Only US service members who required care in the intensive care unit were included for analysis. Data on age, race, sex, Injury Severity Score (ISS), first available lactate, and requirement for massive transfusion were collected. Univariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the subsequent development of early AKI. Multivariable Cox regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. RESULTS: The two observational cohorts yielded 134 subjects for analysis. The studies had broadly similar populations but differed in terms of age and need for massive transfusion. The rate of early AKI in the combined cohort was 34.3%, with the majority (80.5%) occurring within the first two hospital days. Patients with AKI had higher unadjusted mortality rates than those without AKI (21.7% vs. 2.3%, p < 0.001). After adjustment, ISS (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.03; p = 0.046) and initial lactate (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.31; p = 0.015) were independently associated with the development of AKI. CONCLUSION: AKI is common in combat casualties enrolled in two prospective intensive care unit studies, occurring in 34.3%, and is associated with crude mortality. ISS and initial lactate are independently associated with the subsequent development of early AKI.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Heegard KD, Stewart IJ, Cap AP, Sosnov JA, Kwan HK, Glass KR, Morrow BD, Latack W, Henderson AT, Saenz KK, Siew ED, Ikizler TA, Chung KK. Early acute kidney injury in military casualties. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2015 May;78(5):988-93.

Seroprevalence and seroincidence of herpes simplex virus (2006-2010), syphilis (2006-2010), and vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus subtypes (2000-2010) among US military personnel.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections have historically been burdensome in military populations. We describe the seroprevalence and seroincidence of vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus (VP-HPV) subtypes in a sample of 200 servicemen, along with the seroprevalence and seroincidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1/2) and syphilis in a sample of 200 men and 200 women. METHODS: Sera from 200 men, along with associated demographic data, were obtained and tested for HPV serotypes at service entry and 10 years later. Similarly, 200 active-duty men and 200 active-duty women were tested for HSV-1/2 at entry to service and 4 years later. RESULTS: The baseline prevalence of VP-HPV subtypes was 14.5%, and cumulative seroincidence of new infection was 34% over a 10-year period (n = 68). Of these, 63% (n = 43) represented HPV-6, HPV-11, or both; 18% of new infections were either HPV-16 or HPV-18, and 19% (n = 13) were a mixture of all 4 strains. At entry to military service, 33.5% of men were seropositive for HSV-1 and 1.5% were positive for HSV-2; seroincidence was 3.4 and 1.1 per 100 person-years, respectively. Among women, 39% were seropositive for HSV-1 and 4.0% for HSV-2; seroincidence was 5.5 and 3.3 per 100 person-years, respectively. There were 2 prevalent and 3 incident cases of syphilis. CONCLUSIONS: Sexually transmitted infections in military populations are highly prevalent, incident, and epidemiologically distinct. Our data show the rates of HPV and HSV-1/2 acquisition that are higher than those seen in the general public, again highlighting the need for continued preventive efforts. Consideration of universal HPV vaccination among men is warranted.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Masel J, et. al., Seroprevalence and seroincidence of herpes simplex virus (2006-2010), syphilis (2006-2010), and vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus subtypes (2000-2010) among US military personnel. Sex Transm Dis. 2015 May;42(5):253-8

Development of a mother-child database for drug exposure and adverse event detection in the Military Health System.

Study

Abstract

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop a mother-child linked database consisting of all eligible active duty military personnel, retirees, and their dependents in order to conduct medication-related analyses to improve the safety and quality of care in the Military Health System (MHS). METHODS: Eligible women of reproductive age with at least one pregnancy-related encounter between January 2005 and December 2013 receiving care in the MHS were included in the study population. Building on previously published algorithms, we used pregnancy-related diagnostic and procedure codes, parameterized temporal constraints, and data elements unique to the MHS to identify pregnancies ending in live births, stillbirth, spontaneous abortion, or ectopic pregnancy. Pregnancies ending in live births were matched to presumptive offspring using birth dates and family-based sponsorship identification. Antidepressant and antiepileptic use during pregnancy was evaluated using electronic pharmacy data. RESULTS: Algorithms identified 755,232 women who experienced 1,099,648 complete pregnancies with both pregnancy care encounter and pregnancy outcome. Of the 924,320 live birth pregnancies, 827,753 (90.0%) were matched to offspring. Algorithms also identified 5,663 stillbirths, 11,358 ectopic pregnancies, and 169,665 spontaneous abortions. Among the matched singleton live birth pregnancies, 7.1% of mothers were dispensed an antidepressant at any point during pregnancy, usually a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, (75.3%), whereas 1.3% of mothers were dispensed an antiepileptic drug.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office: Pharmacovigilance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Taylor LG, Thelus Jean R, Gordon G, Fram D, Coster T. Development of a mother-child database for drug exposure and adverse event detection in the Military Health System. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2015 May;24(5):510-7.

Impact of parents' wartime military deployment and injury on young children's safety and mental health.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Children are at risk for adverse outcomes during parental military deployments. We aim to determine the impact of parental deployment and combat injury on young children's postdeployment mental health, injuries, and maltreatment. METHOD: This is a population-based, retrospective cohort study of young children of active duty military parents during fiscal years (FY) 2006 to 2007, a high deployment period. A total of 487,460 children, 3 to 8 years of age, who received Military Health System care, were included. The relative rates of mental health, injury, and child maltreatment visits of children whose parents deployed and children of combat-injured parents were compared to children unexposed to parental deployment. RESULTS: Of the included children, 58,479 (12%) had a parent deploy, and 5,405 (1%) had a parent injured during deployment. Relative to children whose parents did not deploy, children of deployed and combat-injured parents, respectively, had additional visits for mental health diagnoses (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.09 [95% CI = 1.02-1.17], IRR = 1.67 [95% CI = 1.47-1.89]), injuries (IRR = 1.07 [95% CI = 1.04-1.09], IRR = 1.24 [95% CI = 1.17-1.32]), and child maltreatment (IRR = 1.21 [95% CI = 1.11-1.32], IRR 2.30 = [95% CI 2.02-2.61]) postdeployment. CONCLUSION: Young children of deployed and combat-injured military parents have more postdeployment visits for mental health, injuries, and child maltreatment. Mental health problems, injuries, and maltreatment after a parent's return from deployment are amplified in children of combat-injured parents. Increased preventive and intervention services are needed for young children as parents return from deployments. Child health and mental health providers are crucial to effective identification of these at-risk children to ensure effective care provision

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: April 01, 2015
  • Citation: Hisle-Gorman E, Harrington D, Nylund CM, Tercyak KP, Anthony BJ, Gorman GH. Impact of parents' wartime military deployment and injury on young children's safety and mental health. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Apr;54(4):294-301.
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