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Men's Health

Did you know? Men are less likely than women to seek medical care and are more likely to smoke, drink, and choose unhealthy or risky behaviors. 

Getting the most out of life requires a commitment to attitudes that foster healthy lifestyle choices. While men and women have many of the same health concerns, men may be affected differently than women. In addition, there are some conditions which are unique to men. Familiarity with men’s health issues, regular screenings and prevention are keys to maintaining good physical wellness.

Men's Health Conditions

According to the CDC, the top causes of death among adult men in the U.S. are heart disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, chronic lower respiratory disease and stroke.

Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease

Colon Cancer

Heart Disease

Prostate Cancer

Stroke

What can you do to take charge of your health?

See a doctor for regular checkups even if you feel healthy. Some diseases and health conditions don’t have symptoms at first. Plus, seeing a doctor will give you a chance to learn more about your health. Here are some more things you can do to take charge of your health:

  • Eat healthy and get active.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Know your family’s health history.
  • Get screening tests to check for health problems before you have symptoms.
  • Make sure you’re up to date on your shots.

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Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to achieve and sustain an erection that is adequate for sexual intercourse. ED can result from a problem with any of the above: •	Hormones •	Emotions •	Nerves •	Muscles •	Blood vessels These factors are required for an erection include. Picture is a brain (left) and a male figure (right) showing the heart and main arteries of the body. The top three most common ED diagnoses are: 1.	Psychosexual dysfunction 2.	Hypoactive sexual desire disorder 3.	Male orgasmic disorder Image shows a couple outside together during sunset. House displays in background. Causes of ED (Shows cut out of male body highlighting areas of the body where causes happen) •	Unrealistic sexual expectations •	Depression/ Anxiety/ Stress or other mental health issues •	High blood pressure •	Diabetes •	Obesity •	Injuries that affect the pelvic area or spinal cord •	Low testosterone •	Aging, Substance Abuse Demographics: •	Incidence rate of erectile dysfunction are higher among black, non-Hispanic servicemen when compared to other race/ethnicity groups. •	Black non-Hispanic service members have higher incidence rates of several conditions known to be risk factors for erectile dysfunction, including hypertension, obesity and diabetes. •	Separated, divorced and widowed servicemen had a higher incidence rate of ED than servicemen never married. •	Servicemen never deployed had the highest crude incidence rate of erectile dysfunction. Get the facts •	Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual complaint reported by men to healthcare providers •	Among male service members nearly half of erectile dysfunction cases related predominantly or exclusively to psychological factors. •	Incidence rates of psychogenic erectile dysfunction are greater than organic erectile dysfunction for service members. •	Organic erectile dysfunction can result from physical factors such as obesity, smoking, diabetes, cardiovascular disease or medication use. •	Highest incidence rates were observed in those aged 60 years or older. •	Those 40 years or older are most commonly diagnosed with erectile dysfunction. Effective against erectile dysfunction •	Regular exercise  ( Shows soldier running) •	Psychological counseling (Shows two soldiers engaging in mental health counseling. They are seating on a couch).  •	Quit smoking ( shows lit cigarette)  •	Stop substance abuse ( Shows to shot glasses filled with alcohol) •	Nutritional supplements ( Shows open pill bottle of supplements) •	Surgical treatment ( Shows surgical instruments) Talk to your partner Although Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is a difficult issue for sex partners to discuss, talking openly can often be the best way to resolve stress and discover underlying causes. If you are experiencing erectile dysfunction, explore treatment options with your doctor. Learn more about ED by reading ‘Erectile Dysfunction Among Male Active Component Service Members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2004 – 2013.’ Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) Vol. 21 No. 9 – September 2014 at www.Health.mil/MSMRArchives. Follow us on Twitter at AFHSBPAGE. #MensHealth

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