Back to Top Skip to main content

Military Drug Take Back Program offers safe drug disposal

Excess prescription and over-the-counter drugs can pose a serious risk in your home. The Military Health System is helping the military community fight back against the dangers of unneeded, unused and expired drugs by offering Drug Take Back at U.S. military pharmacies. Most pharmacies have fixed containers in place where you can drop off excess drugs. Airman 1st Class Hannah McDonald, 1st Special Operations Medical Squadron pharmacy apprentice, disposes of an unwanted prescription in to a container in the pharmacy lobby on Hurlburt Field, Florida. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Kai White) Excess prescription and over-the-counter drugs can pose a serious risk in your home. The Military Health System is helping the military community fight back against the dangers of unneeded, unused and expired drugs by offering Drug Take Back at U.S. military pharmacies. Most pharmacies have fixed containers in place where you can drop off excess drugs. Airman 1st Class Hannah McDonald, 1st Special Operations Medical Squadron pharmacy apprentice, disposes of an unwanted prescription in to a container in the pharmacy lobby on Hurlburt Field, Florida. (DoD photo illustration)

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program | Substance Abuse

Excess prescription and over-the-counter drugs can pose a serious risk in your home. The Military Health System (MHS) is helping the military community fight back against the dangers of unneeded, unused and expired drugs by offering Drug Take Back at military pharmacies in the U.S.

“Proper disposal of unneeded, unused and expired drugs lowers the risk of misuse and environmental contamination,” said Dr. George Jones, chief of Pharmacy Operations at the DHA. “The MHS Drug Take Back program accepts both prescription and over-the-counter drugs, so this is the time to clean out your medicine cabinet.”

Military pharmacies in the U.S. offer two Drug Take Back options. Most pharmacies have fixed containers in place where you can drop off your excess drugs. Others offer envelopes you can take home, fill with your drugs, and then mail in. Some have both. You can’t dispose of illegal drugs at MHS Drug Take Back locations.

Check to see if your local military pharmacy offers drug takeback at www.tricare.mil/mtf.

“Holding onto drugs past their useful life is a bad idea,” said Jones. “It could be a child accidently ingesting an over-the-counter sleep aid, or an addict finding expired pain killers. Don’t take the risk of having these drugs in your home once you don’t need them anymore.”

For more information on the Military Health System’s Drug Take Back efforts, visit the Drug Take Back Spotlight.

You also may be interested in...

There is hope

Article
7/11/2018
Medically assisted treatment for opioid use can break the cycle of addiction.

More than 350,000 deaths are attributed to opioid overdoses nationwide since 1999

Recommended Content:

Mental Health Care | Substance Abuse | Addiction | Mental Wellness

Life without liquor

Article
6/29/2018
There are 2.5 million alcohol-related deaths worldwide each year, according to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. (Courtesy photo)

One service member’s story of how he overcame a drinking problem

Recommended Content:

Mental Wellness | Substance Abuse

Progress in preventing opioid abuse, more needs to be done

Article
6/26/2018
Air Force Staff Sgt. Matthew Pick, with the 66th Security Forces Squadron, holds a nasal applicator and naloxone medication vial at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. Naloxone is one of several medications designed to temporarily reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Hanscom was the first Air Force installation to issue the drug to law enforcement personnel under permission of the base commander. (U.S. Air Force photo by Mark Herlihy)

The Military Health System has a shared responsibility in addressing the nation’s opioid epidemic

Recommended Content:

Substance Abuse

DHA PI 6025.04: Pain Management and Opioid Safety in the MHS

Policy

The purpose of our MHS Pain Management Campaign is to enable Clinical Communities to provide evidence-based pain management guided by clinical practice guidelines (CPGs): effectively treat acute and chronic pain; promote non-pharmacologic treatment; prevent acute pain from becoming chronic; and minimize use of opioids with appropriate prescribing only when indicated. The Pain Management Clinical Support Service achieves these ends through clinical improvements in pain care, clinician and patient education, and research. This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI) is a dual effort between the Pain Management Clinical Support Service and the Clinical Communities to achieve our stated purpose through implementation of the MHS Stepped Care Model.

DHA PI 6025.25: Military Health System (MHS) Drug Take Back (DTB) Program

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (g): - Describes procedures for MHS organizations to offer beneficiaries the option of returning their controlled and non-controlled prescriptions and over-the-counter medications for disposal through a DTB program. The DTB program will provide an environmentally safe method for beneficiaries to properly and safely remove unused and expired medications from circulation, including medications that can be used for suicide or suicide attempts and have the potential for misuse, diversion, or accidental poisoning. - Details the tasks and procedures necessary to ensure successful implementation of the MHS DTB program within military Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs).

The sobering reality of one drink too many

Article
1/16/2018
Some people follow the boozy holiday season with Dry January, an unofficial movement to abstain from alcohol for 31 days. But alcohol consumption is a year-round activity, and for some, a year-round problem that requires professional help. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Sahara. L. Fales)

Resolve to limit alcohol, experts recommend

Recommended Content:

Substance Abuse

Moving? Toss unwanted or expired medications appropriately

Article
6/9/2017
Many service members and their families are gearing up to move this summer. As you organize your house and belongings to prepare for your move, one area of your home you shouldn’t overlook is your medicine cabinet. (U.S. Navy photo)

With the Military Health System Drug Take Back program, you can safely and easily dispose of unwanted and expired medications at U.S. military pharmacies

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program

Celebrate good times! No luck, charms or alcohol required

Article
3/17/2017
Marine Cpl. Edward Blodgett, wears a leprechaun hat at a regimental run in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day at Camp Pendleton, California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Khoa Pelczar)

Unless you’ve been hiding under the Blarney Stone, you’ve seen the shamrocks — St. Patrick’s Day is upon us

Recommended Content:

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Traumatic Brain Injury | Substance Abuse

New year, new medicine cabinet

Article
1/13/2017
The Military Health System has a drug take back program to help service members and their families dispose of their medications safely. The Department of Justice also has a national take-back initiative. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Valerie Monroy)

Many of our medicine cabinets have bottles of prescribed and over-the-counter medications that are expired or that we no longer use

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program | Substance Abuse

To drink or not to drink: Have a plan

Article
12/21/2016
USS John C. Stennis' crew and family members dance during a command holiday party. For someone concerned about alcohol intake or battling substance abuse, social events may seem threatening. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Jiang)

For someone concerned about alcohol intake or battling substance abuse, social events may seem threatening

Recommended Content:

Substance Abuse | Integrative Wellness

DoD makes prescription drug disposal easy for beneficiaries

Article
9/15/2016
Defense Department health care beneficiaries can now safely and easily dispose of expired and unused medications by bringing them to a military treatment facility or, in some cases, picking up a mailing envelope from the installation to send for destruction of the medications free of charge. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The new Drug Take Back program allows for disposal of expired and unused prescription and over-the-counter medications

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program

Look Familiar?

Infographic
9/13/2016
Infographic showing a stash of prescription and OTC drugs...says "Look Familiar? Might be time to clean out your medicine cabinet."

If you have a stash of unused prescription or over-the-counter drugs, it might be time to clean out your medicine cabinet.

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program

Military Health System Drug Take Back Option

Video
9/13/2016
Military Health System Drug Take Back Option

Watch this video to learn more about the Military Health System Drug Take Back option.

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program

Drug Take Back Poster 1: Look Familiar?

Poster
9/12/2016

1 of 3 posters for the MHS Drug Take Back program.

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program

Drug Take Back Poster 3: Safe and Secure

Poster
9/12/2016

3 of 3 posters for the MHS Drug Take Back program.

Recommended Content:

Drug Take Back Program
<< < 1 2 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 2

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.