Back to Top Skip to main content
Alert Arrow ALERT!!

There are emergency procedures in place for parts of world due to weather.

Get the latest information on emergency prescription refills and PCM referral waivers. 

Mixing supplements and medications

Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker) Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Integrative Wellness | TRICARE Pharmacy Program

Dietary supplements and medications, prescription or over-the-counter, can be a risky combination. That’s because many dietary supplement ingredients, especially herbs and botanicals, can interact with drugs (such as ones to treat blood pressure, diabetes, depression and anxiety) or even other dietary supplements. Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. If you’re taking or plan to take a dietary supplement, inform your healthcare provider to make sure it’s safe to use with your medications.

Learn more about how supplements can change the effectiveness of your medications and know when drug-supplement interactions are especially important by using this interactive web resource from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). And for information about many known interactions between dietary supplement ingredients and medications, as well as other dietary supplement ingredients, visit the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD).

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

DHA PI 6025.08: Pharmacy Enterprise Activity EA

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI): a. Based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (g), establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures to: (1) Exercise management responsibilities for Pharmacy Shared Service/EA functions in the Military Health System (MHS). This DHA-PI is binding on the MHS and supports the Director’s, DHA, responsibility to develop appropriate management models to maximize efficiencies in the activities carried out by DHA. (2) Recognize the Pharmacy Work Group (PWG) as the operational body to implement pharmacy strategies and programs per the Director’s, DHA, guidance. Also, develop strategic initiatives and business process models to optimize pharmacy operations and programs in accordance with Reference (e). (3) Promulgate guidance, define roles, assign responsibilities, and prescribe procedures for the development, coordination, execution, and implementation of standardized Pharmacy Operations and EA procedures within the MHS and Military Departments (MILDEPs). (4) Execute Pharmacy EA assigned responsibilities and functions, and in accordance with Reference (b), when needed, rely on advice and assistance of governance councils established by the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness and the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (ASD(HA)), including senior representatives of the MILDEPs. (5) Provide DHA combat support agency pharmacy functions, in accordance with Reference (b), specifically involving support for operating forces engaged in planning for, or conducting, military operations, including support during conflict or in the conduct of other military activities related to countering threats to U.S. National Security. The Pharmacy EA innovatively manages and standardizes DoD pharmacy operations in a fiscally responsible manner to optimize readiness, improve health, and lower costs through better care. (6) Support baseline knowledge, skills, and abilities for each wartime pharmacy specialty, addressing gaps between peacetime and deployed operational requirements, in collaboration with the MILDEPs, and military Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) pharmacies. (7) Support programs for skills and knowledge assessments and provide for training/retraining opportunities, as needed, for each wartime pharmacy specialty for military MTF pharmacies. (8) Empower enterprise-level pharmacy clinical communities to define, prioritize, and implement “best-in-class” High Reliability Organization practices to enable readiness through decreasing variation, improving outcomes, and positively impacting healthcare in the MHS. (9) Support the scaling and reconfiguring of pharmacy capabilities required to support the forward operating environment; e.g., hospital ship, combat support hospitals, Expeditionary Medical Support. The Services’ Surgeons General will have deployed medical mission command over health services support of pharmacy resources and capabilities at various levels of command and at diverse locations. b. Transforms varied Tri-Service Pharmacy Operations approaches into a single, integrated DHA Pharmacy Program that standardizes pharmacy shared services and optimizes business processes as directed by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, Section 702 (Reference (c)). c. Drives standardization of institutional and operational commands, sustains and improves medical readiness, creates value within the MHS, and achieves interoperability across platforms to deliver better health care to the warfighter, MHS beneficiaries, and build a medically ready force.

DHA PI 6025.07: Naloxone in the MTFs

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (h), establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures for prescribing and dispensing naloxone by pharmacists in MTFs to eligible beneficiaries, upon beneficiary request, or when the pharmacist determines the beneficiary meets the established criteria for being at risk for a life-threatening opiate overdose.

DHA PI 6025.04: Pain Management and Opioid Safety in the MHS

Policy

The purpose of our MHS Pain Management Campaign is to enable Clinical Communities to provide evidence-based pain management guided by clinical practice guidelines (CPGs): effectively treat acute and chronic pain; promote non-pharmacologic treatment; prevent acute pain from becoming chronic; and minimize use of opioids with appropriate prescribing only when indicated. The Pain Management Clinical Support Service achieves these ends through clinical improvements in pain care, clinician and patient education, and research. This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI) is a dual effort between the Pain Management Clinical Support Service and the Clinical Communities to achieve our stated purpose through implementation of the MHS Stepped Care Model.

DHA PI 6025.25: Military Health System (MHS) Drug Take Back (DTB) Program

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (g): - Describes procedures for MHS organizations to offer beneficiaries the option of returning their controlled and non-controlled prescriptions and over-the-counter medications for disposal through a DTB program. The DTB program will provide an environmentally safe method for beneficiaries to properly and safely remove unused and expired medications from circulation, including medications that can be used for suicide or suicide attempts and have the potential for misuse, diversion, or accidental poisoning. - Details the tasks and procedures necessary to ensure successful implementation of the MHS DTB program within military Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs).

Increases to TRICARE pharmacy copayments coming

Article
1/5/2018
TRICARE urges you to take command of your health care to enhance your TRICARE experience.

On Feb 1, 2018, copayments for prescription drugs at TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and retail pharmacies will increase.

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Pharmacy Program | TRICARE Formulary

Increases to TRICARE pharmacy copayments coming Feb. 1, 2018

Article
12/18/2017
TRICARE urges you to take command of your health care to enhance your TRICARE experience.

On Feb. 1, 2018, copayments for prescription drugs at TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery and retail pharmacies will increase.

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Pharmacy Program | TRICARE Health Program

Four tips for staying healthy this holiday season

Article
12/15/2017
The simple act of washing your hands will decrease the risk of illness for you and your family this holiday season. (U.S. Air Force photo by Michelle Gigante)

Simple ways to make this the best time of the year for wellness

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Integrative Wellness | Mental Wellness

WBAMC pharmacist catches serious drug interaction

Article
11/27/2017
Dr. Anna Jewula, pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, is recognized for her attentiveness in assisting a patient with a prescription order that contraindicated a previous prescription medication, avoiding a potentially serious drug interaction detrimental to the patient’s health (U.S. Army photo Marcy Sanchez)

Thanks to a pharmacist’s careful eye, one patient avoided a potentially deadly drug interaction

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | TRICARE Pharmacy Program

Things that make you go ‘om’: Meditation for healthy living

Article
11/15/2017
A soldier with the 160th Signal Brigade meditates before duty at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan.  (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Margaret Taylor)

Researchers say brain changes may lead to long-term benefits

Recommended Content:

Integrative Wellness | Human Performance Resource Center | Warrior Care

Annual consent for automatic prescription refills begins Sept. 1

Article
8/31/2017
Beginning Sept. 1, 2017, Express Scripts will need annual consent from patients who want to receive automatic refills of their maintenance medications enrolled in TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alystria Maurer)

Beginning Sept. 1, 2017, Express Scripts will need annual consent from patients who want to receive automatic refills of their maintenance medications enrolled in TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Pharmacy Program | Maintenance Drug List

Watch out for 'hidden' sugars

Article
7/14/2017
Some sugars occur naturally in fruits and milk products. However, other sugars are added to foods and drinks during preparation, processing, or at your table. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Caleb McDonald)

Some sugars occur naturally in fruits and milk products. However, other sugars are added to foods and drinks during preparation, processing, or at your table.

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center | Operation Live Well

Eat a rainbow of colorful produce

Article
6/12/2017
For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes. (U.S. Army photo by Honey Nixon)

Eating colorful fruits and veggies can help reduce your risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes and some cancers too

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Summertime food safety

Article
5/30/2017
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. To avoid this, follow good cooking tips. Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The CDC estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety | Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Protect your back during your PCS

Article
5/22/2017
Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix. So be mindful of how you’re lifting and moving while you’re packing up and loading up. (U.S. Navy photo)

Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Preventive Health

Pain, pain, go away: Improving care and safety when managing pain

Article
5/15/2017
Recently published opioid therapy clinical practice guideline focuses aims to improve quality of care and patient safety when treating acute and chronic pain (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Valerie Monroy).

DoD and VA have released updated recommendations for providers managing patients’ acute and chronic pain using opioid therapy.

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Pharmacy Program | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives | Patient Safety | Warrior Care
<< < 1 2 3 4 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 4

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.