Back to Top Skip to main content
Alert Arrow ALERT!!

There are emergency procedures in place for parts of world due to weather.

Get the latest information on emergency prescription refills and PCM referral waivers. 

Lung cancer screening saves lives

A patient at Naval Hospital Pensacola prepares to have a low-dose computed tomography test done to screen for lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women. Early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz) A patient at Naval Hospital Pensacola prepares to have a low-dose computed tomography test done to screen for lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women. Early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments | Preventive Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

PENSACOLA, Fla. — Naval Hospital Pensacola has a new program to screen at risk patients for lung cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women according to the American Cancer Society. 

Lung cancer can be very hard to cure, but early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. 

“If we can find the cancer before symptoms appear, life expectancy is much better,” said Navy Cmdr. Mark Seigh, radiologist, Naval Hospital Pensacola. 

Lung cancer is often preventable because it is related to smoking or second hand smoke. It is possible to develop lung cancer from exposure to radon or other environmental factors, but these are far less common. Screenings are usually done for patients who are between the age of 55 and 80, smoked at least 30 pack years and currently smoke or quit smoking less than 15 years ago. Pack years is the number of cigarette packs smoked every day multiplied by the number of years smoking. 

“If you have a history of smoking, you should talk to your provider about whether a lung cancer screening is necessary or not,” said Navy Lt. Harry Calisch, a physician at NHP. 

The lung cancer screening program at NHP is currently for patients enrolled to care at one of the hospital’s Medical Home Port Teams. If a patient is determined to be at risk for lung cancer, their primary care manager will refer them to the Radiology Department to have a low-dose computed tomography test done. The LDCT makes pictures of the insides of a person’s lungs. 

“The LDCT is similar to an x-ray and is the study of choice for lung cancer,” said Seigh. “It only takes a couple of minutes and the results will usually be available to the physician that day.” 

The results of the test will be analyzed for signs of cancer and a biopsy may be performed. If cancer cells are found, a treatment plan will be developed between the physician and patient. 

“If cancer is discovered after the screening, the patient’s provider will work with them to develop an appropriate treatment plan,” said Calisch. “If discovered early, the chances for beating the cancer are significantly better than if it is discovered later.”The screening program is not a substitute for prevention. The best way to reduce the risk of lung cancer is to not smoke. Quitting smoking can be very difficult, but help is available through your health care provider. 

Each year, there are over 150,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States according to the American Cancer Society. If you think you may be at risk, contact your health care provider today.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

The positive impact of preventive health

Article
8/22/2017
Col. Andrew Wiesen, director of preventive health for the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, talks about the role of preventive health and good health habits in improving length and quality of life. (Photo courtesy of Col. Andrew Wiesen)

Daily healthy habits help bodies fight illness, disease, and injury, and they are essential for the health readiness of service members. During Preventive Health Month, the Military Health System encourages everyone to remember the impact of preventive services and good habits on overall health.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health

Possible cause for severe eczema has been found

Article
8/21/2017
Some patients living with severe eczema – a possible disqualifying factor for military service – have been found to have mutations on a gene called CARD11. Identified as a possible cause for the condition, the discovery can lead to exciting possibilities for advancements, according to the researchers.

Some patients living with severe eczema have been found to have mutations on a gene called CARD11 – Identified as a possible cause for the condition, the discovery can lead to exciting possibilities for advancements, according to the researchers

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments | Innovation | Warrior Care

Vaccinations: Important part of back-to-school checklist

Article
8/16/2017
Air Force Senior Airman Antoinette Fowler shows a 4-year-old how to give a vaccination during a teddy bear clinic at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. The event taught children about the importance of vaccination and immunization. Getting necessary vaccinations now is as much a rite of going back to school as picking up pencils and paper for the first day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ilka Cole)

Making sure children have all their vaccinations before going back to school is as important as making sure they have the right supplies

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health

Decision Brief Pediatric Health Care Services

Presentation
8/10/2017

Defense Health Board briefing about Pediatric Health Care Services

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments

Naval Hospital Oak Harbor first Navy hospital to pilot new electronic health record

Article
8/4/2017
Navy Seaman Joseph White and wife Lauren with their first child, Avalee. Avalee is the first infant born in a military hospital using the Department of Defense's new joint electronic health record, MHS GENESIS. (U.S. Navy photo by Patricia Rose)

Naval Hospital Oak Harbor was selected as the first Navy hospital to deploy MHS GENESIS, and has been successfully using the program since July 15

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS

Pumping on the job is worth any hassles, breast-feeding moms say

Article
8/3/2017
Navy Lt. Alea DePauw (left) with Ethan, 6 months, and Lt. Cmdr. Melissa Rosloniec (right) with Jack, 10 months, pump when they work at Naval Medical Center San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Elizabeth Merriam)

August 1-7 is World Breastfeeding Week, an annual global campaign to promote the benefits of nursing; this year marks the 25th annual event, which is recognized in more than 170 countries

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health

Immunizations provide the ounce of prevention delivering the pound of cure

Article
8/1/2017
Air Force Col. Tonya Rans, chief, Immunization Healthcare Branch, Defense Health Agency.

Air Force Col. Tonya Rans, chief, Immunization Healthcare Branch at the Defense Health Agency, explains how vaccinations are an important preventive health tool.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Immunization Healthcare

MHS Online Transparency Site launch

Article
7/20/2017
Patients who use military hospitals and clinics will find it easier to see how their facility is performing thanks to June 28 changes by the Military Health System to its transparency website. (MHS graphic)

Recent changes put ratings at beneficiary fingertips through simple online clicks

Recommended Content:

MHS Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Information (for Patients) | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

In the zone at WBAMC's inpatient wards

Article
7/17/2017
Usa Thompson, staff nurse, Surgical Ward, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, measures medication while donning a visual aid designed to limit interactions and distractions while administering medications. Inpatient Wards at WBAMC implemented distraction-free designated times and other initiatives to proactively combat potential for error in missed or incorrect medications. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Inpatient Wards have proactively implemented a distraction-free designated time dubbed, Medzone

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Patient Safety

One size no longer fits all: MHS’ approach to individualized medicine

Article
7/7/2017
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and member of Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences Board of Regents, provided the opening remarks at the recent Precision Medicine Research Conference in Potomac, Maryland. (Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences photo)

Military Health System experts discussed the importance of individualized approach to prevention and treatment, and the need for MHS and Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences to pave the way

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Medical Research and Development

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
6/19/2017
Did you know  … ? In 2016, essential hypertension accounted for 52,586 encounters for health care among 29,612 active component service members in the U.S. Armed Forces. Of all cardiovascular diseases, essential hypertension is by far the most common specific condition diagnosed among active duty service members. Untreated hypertension increases the risks of subsequent ischemic heart disease (heart attack), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), and kidney failure. CHART: Healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016 Major condition: •	For all other cardiovascular the number of medical encounters was 70,781, Rank 29, number of individuals affected was 35,794 with a rank of 30. The number of bed days was 4,285 with a rank of 21. •	For essential hypertension the number of medical encounters was 52,586, rank 35, number of individuals affected was 29,612 with a rank of 35. The number of bed days was 151 with a rank of 86. •	For cerebrovascular disease the number of medical encounters was 7,772, rank 79, number of individuals affected was 1,708, with a rank of 96. The number of bed days was 2,107 with a rank of 32. •	For ischemic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 6,629, rank 83, number of individuals affected 2,399 with a rank of 87. The number of bed days was 1,140 with a rank of 42. •	For inflammatory the number of medical encounters was 2,221, rank 106, number of individuals affected 1,302 with a rank of 97. The number of bed days was 297 with a rank of 72. •	For rheumatic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 319, rank 125, number of individuals affected 261, with a rank of 121. The number of bed days was 2 with a rank of 133. Learn more about healthcare burdens attributable to various diseases and injuries by visiting Health.mil/MSMRArchives. #LoveYourHeart Infogaphic graphic features transparent graphic of a man’s heart illuminated within his chest.

This infographic documents healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases among active component, U.S. Armed Forces in 2016.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Preventive Health | Men's Health | Heart Health

Military telepain clinics in D.C. area help patients manage pain

Article
6/7/2017
Dr. Christopher Spevak, director of the opioid safety program for the National Capital Region in and around Washington, D.C., uses the telehealth equipment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. (DoD photo by Kalila Fleming)

Being able to see your doctor without being in the same room, or even the same hospital, is giving some Military Health System beneficiaries more access to care; and it’s helping the MHS manage its opioid usage

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Airmen, Sailors support life-saving mission

Article
5/25/2017
Air Force Staff Sgt. Angel Figueroa, 18th Medical Operations Squadron technician, (left) and Maj. Melissa Dassinger, 18th Aerospace Evacuation Squadron Training Flight commander, test a “Giraffe” omnibed at Kadena Air Base, Japan. A C-17 Globemaster III can be equipped with materials and systems required to transport injured patients across great distances quickly and safely. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Quay Drawdy)

Airmen and Sailors worked together to outfit a C-17 Globemaster III with life-saving equipment

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Innovation | Technology

Medical encounters, by condition, U.S. Armed Forces 2016

Infographic
5/25/2017
This infographic documents the three burden of disease related conditions that accounted for the most medical encounters among the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces in 2016. LONG FORM: In 2016, the three burden of disease related conditions accounted for the most medical encounters were: •	Other back problems •	All other musculoskeletal diseases •	Knee injuries Altogether they accounted for 25.1% of all illness-and injury-related medical encounters overall. More Findings The top nine conditions that accounted for the most medical encounters accounted for 53.1% of all illness-and-injury –related medical encounters overall. In general, the conditions that accounted for the most medical encounters were predominantly musculoskeletal disorders such as the back) injuries to the knee, arm, shoulder, foot or ankle, and mental disorders like anxiety and adjustment conditions. View more findings at www.Health.mil/MSMR    Graphic details This graphic displays the musculoskeletal of a male service member’s body to show the bones of the back and knees.

This infographic documents the three burden of disease related conditions that accounted for the most medical encounters among the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces in 2016.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Conditions and Treatments

Protect your back during your PCS

Article
5/22/2017
Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix. So be mindful of how you’re lifting and moving while you’re packing up and loading up. (U.S. Navy photo)

Service members and their families relocate a lot, and moving to a new home is hard enough without adding a back injury to the mix

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Preventive Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 13

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.