Back to Top Skip to main content

Lung cancer screening saves lives

A patient at Naval Hospital Pensacola prepares to have a low-dose computed tomography test done to screen for lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women. Early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz) A patient at Naval Hospital Pensacola prepares to have a low-dose computed tomography test done to screen for lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women. Early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments | Preventive Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

PENSACOLA, Fla. — Naval Hospital Pensacola has a new program to screen at risk patients for lung cancer, which is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women according to the American Cancer Society. 

Lung cancer can be very hard to cure, but early detection can lower the risk of dying from this disease. 

“If we can find the cancer before symptoms appear, life expectancy is much better,” said Navy Cmdr. Mark Seigh, radiologist, Naval Hospital Pensacola. 

Lung cancer is often preventable because it is related to smoking or second hand smoke. It is possible to develop lung cancer from exposure to radon or other environmental factors, but these are far less common. Screenings are usually done for patients who are between the age of 55 and 80, smoked at least 30 pack years and currently smoke or quit smoking less than 15 years ago. Pack years is the number of cigarette packs smoked every day multiplied by the number of years smoking. 

“If you have a history of smoking, you should talk to your provider about whether a lung cancer screening is necessary or not,” said Navy Lt. Harry Calisch, a physician at NHP. 

The lung cancer screening program at NHP is currently for patients enrolled to care at one of the hospital’s Medical Home Port Teams. If a patient is determined to be at risk for lung cancer, their primary care manager will refer them to the Radiology Department to have a low-dose computed tomography test done. The LDCT makes pictures of the insides of a person’s lungs. 

“The LDCT is similar to an x-ray and is the study of choice for lung cancer,” said Seigh. “It only takes a couple of minutes and the results will usually be available to the physician that day.” 

The results of the test will be analyzed for signs of cancer and a biopsy may be performed. If cancer cells are found, a treatment plan will be developed between the physician and patient. 

“If cancer is discovered after the screening, the patient’s provider will work with them to develop an appropriate treatment plan,” said Calisch. “If discovered early, the chances for beating the cancer are significantly better than if it is discovered later.”The screening program is not a substitute for prevention. The best way to reduce the risk of lung cancer is to not smoke. Quitting smoking can be very difficult, but help is available through your health care provider. 

Each year, there are over 150,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States according to the American Cancer Society. If you think you may be at risk, contact your health care provider today.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

New medical practice restores function for trauma, cancer patients

Article
5/18/2017
Army Lt. Col. Owen Johnson III (left), chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service, and Dr. Khang Thai, plastic surgeon, WBAMC, utilize a microscope during a microvascular transplant or "free flap" surgery as part of WBAMC's Reconstructive Microsurgery Program. Reconstructive microsurgery is a new practice to WBAMC and includes the autologous transfer of tissue, nerves and bone to trauma, cancer, or birth-related defected areas of patients, restoring function to the affected area. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

The launch of the Reconstructive Microsurgery Program is the latest in reconstructive surgery advances

Recommended Content:

Innovation | Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Program offers holistic recovery tools to Soldiers with TBI

Article
5/9/2017
MIST Program participants engage in traditional and nontraditional therapies, such as creating symbolic masks. The MIST Program offers holistic treatment to service members with traumatic brain injuries and other traumatic conditions. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)

The holistic focus of MIST recognizes that the whole person is affected by brain injuries and the conditions that often accompany them

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Mental Health Care | Traumatic Brain Injury | Mental Wellness

Secretary Shulkin talks with Providers about Prosthetics

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin tours Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin meets service dogs Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Belvoir Hospital offers cutting-edge liver cancer treatment

Article
4/25/2017
For patients battling cancer, quality of life is most often achieved through treatment options. At Belvoir Hospital, a new localized option – the first of its kind for any military hospital on the East Coast – is giving patients with liver tumors another choice to enhance their quality of life. (Department of Defense photo by Reese Brown)

Belvoir Hospital is giving patients with liver tumors another choice to enhance their quality of life

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Technology

Keesler Medical Center surgeons implant Air Force's first Micra Pacemaker

Article
4/21/2017
Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Pacemakers are the most common way to treat bradycardia and restore the heart's normal rhythm by sending electrical impulses to increase heart rate

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

David Grant Medical Center first Air Force hospital to receive advanced birthing simulator

Article
4/20/2017
Medical staff conduct training on the new Complicated OB Emergency Simulator at Travis Air Force Base, California.  Travis has been selected by the Defense Health Agency as one of five installations within DoD to be a pilot base for the new system. The system will provide a standardized platform for training for all levels of clinical staff to promote standardization on patient safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The Defense Health Agency purchased five of the simulators for the Department of Defense and chose Travis as the pilot base for the Air Force to provide the training and necessary feedback

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Children's Health | Women's Health | Technology

Nutrition centers improve health readiness

Article
4/19/2017
Patient care is at the core of multi-service market nutrition centers. These centers provide a range of services to meet individual patient needs within the military health community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nathan Byrnes.)

Nutrition centers at MTFs, especially in large multi-service markets like National Capital Region, benefit patients by providing a variety of services; dietitians at these centers contribute to health readiness in many ways, such as teaching classes, providing training, and carefully preparing patient meals

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Multi-Service Markets | Nutrition | Health Readiness

Belvoir Hospital first in DoD to perform new vision correction procedure

Article
4/13/2017
The Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center at the Belvoir Hospital performs the first small incision lenticule extraction procedure in the DoD, the latest advancement in laser eye surgery. The procedure uses a very fast, short-pulsed laser to perform the vision correction procedure and as a result, visual recovery time is accelerated. (Department of Defense photo by Reese Brown)

Fort Belvoir Community Hospital’s surgeons performed the first small incision lenticule extraction procedure in the Department of Defense

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Vision Loss

WBAMC provides newborn blanket to minimize SIDS

Article
4/6/2017
Karson Winters, son of Army Spc. Samiya Winters and Spc. Deshau Winters, naps while wrapped with a safe sleep blanket, a toe-to-neck zip-up blanket designed to help newborns stay warm while reducing the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, at William Beaumont Army Medical Center. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

According to the American Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Institute, there are about 4,000 sleep-related infant deaths occurring each year in the United States

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Keesler surgeons perform first robotic surgery in Air Force

Article
4/6/2017
Members of the 81st Surgical Operations Squadron perform the first robotic surgery in the Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. Using robotic surgery decreases risk of surgical sight infections while giving the surgeon better visibility and dexterity while operating, which improves the overall surgical procedure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jenay Randolph)

Surgeons used the da Vinci Xi robot to perform a robotic ventral hernia repair

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

Why do you want to be a military doctor?

Video
3/30/2017
Why do you want to be a military doctor?

During the 2017 Military Health System Female Physician Leadership Conference, we asked some military medical students and junior officers to share why they want to be a military medical doctor.

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Diabetes Mellitus

Infographic
3/17/2017
Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a group of chronic metabolic conditions characterized by high blood glucose levels resulting from a decreased ability to produce and or use insulin. DM-related metabolic abnormalities are associated with damage to various organs and tissues. From 2008 - 2015, a total of 9,092 incident cases of DM were reported among active duty service members. This infographic provides details on the overall incidence rates of type 1 and 2 DM cases per 100,000 person-years. It also provides information about service members at higher risk of diabetes. Here are some key findings from the study: •	Type 1 DM (previously known as “insulin-dependent diabetes”) overall incidence rate was 3.0 cases per 100,000 p-yrs. •	Type 2 DM ( “non-insulin-dependent diabetes) was 74.5 cases per 100,000 p-yrs. And rates doubled within each successive age group.  Service members at higher risk of diabetes are male, black, non-Hispanic, unknown race/ ethnicity, Hispanic and enlisted in the Army and Navy. Learn more by visiting Health.mil/AFHSB

Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a group of chronic metabolic conditions characterized by high blood glucose levels resulting from a decreased ability to produce and or use insulin. DM-related metabolic abnormalities are associated with damage to various organs and tissues. From 2008 - 2015, a total of 9,092 incident cases of DM were reported among active ...

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 14

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.