Back to Top Skip to main content
Alert Arrow ALERT!!

There are emergency procedures in place due to Hurricane Michael.

Get the latest information on emergency prescription refills and referral waivers.

Centering prenatal care around you

The first Tripler Army Medical Center Centering Pregnancy program mothers and babies pose for a photo during a special reunion. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Paxton Busch) The first Tripler Army Medical Center Centering Pregnancy program mothers and babies pose for a photo during a special reunion. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Paxton Busch)

Recommended Content:

Women's Health | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | San Antonio

Select Army medical treatment facilities will offer expectant mothers a chance to participate in Centering Pregnancy, a three-year group prenatal care solution starting in March 2017. 

Centering Pregnancy brings 8-10 women who are all due at roughly the same time together for their prenatal care. This provides moms and providers a way to get to know each other, form lasting friendships, and connected in ways not possible in traditional care, according to the Centering Healthcare Institute.

Centering groups are comprised of women of different ages, races, and military ranks who share the common experience of pregnancy, birth, and child care. 

"Centering Pregnancy is prenatal care that includes regular health check-ups with additional time for learning and sharing in a circular group setting. Centering Pregnancy is a way to learn and experience pregnancy with other pregnant women through interactive learning that will help women experience pregnancy in new and rewarding ways," said Dr. Laurena White, Women's Health Program Administrator, Women's Health Service Line, U.S. Army Office of the Surgeon General.

There is significant evidence to support the importance of prenatal care in preventing adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth and low infant birth weight. Studies have shown the group prenatal care model, reduces adverse birth outcomes. 

"Readiness is important to the Army and group prenatal care will increase breastfeeding initiation which improves the health of female Soldiers and their newborn infants while also helping the Soldier achieve a healthy post-pregnancy weight," said White.

Centering Pregnancy groups allow women to spend more time with their provider while interacting with women who are sharing the childbirth experience. The program consists of 10 two-hour sessions beginning at approximately 14 weeks gestation and continuing through eight weeks postpartum. By integrating the health assessment, education, and support, the appointments provide patients with an opportunity to learn more about their pregnancy, labor and delivery, and parenting. 

"The groups provide a safe, intimate setting for women to share their questions, issues, advice, approaches and experiences. Expectant mothers meet other pregnant women with due dates close to theirs and create bonds that can last a lifetime," said White. 

Participating facilities include the Womack Army Medical Center, North Carolina; Tripler AMC, Hawaii; Carl R. Darnall AMC, Texas; Brooke AMC, Texas; Madigan AMC, Washington; William Beaumont AMC, Texas; Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Kentucky;  Winn ACH, Georgia; Evans ACH, Colorado; and Irwin ACH, Kansas.

Army Medicine plans to implement Centering Pregnancy at military treatment facilities with large volume obstetrics capabilities over the next three years to standardize the group approach and improve the prenatal care at the facilities. The goal is to have at least one group start each month at the participating facilities.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Women’s Health: Taking time for yourself

Article
10/16/2018
Navy Lt. Jessica Miller, a nurse at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s Obstetrics/Gynecology Clinic, discusses cervical cancer screenings with a patient. Starting at age 21, women should get a Pap test every three years. After turning 30, women have a choice. Get a Pap test every three years, or get a Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years. Women should talk with their doctor about options. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

The top two causes of death for women are heart disease and cancer

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Women's Health

USNS Comfort conducts mass casualty training exercise

Article
10/15/2018
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Arthur Lammers, an anesthesiologist assigned to the hospital ship USNS Comfort, practices patient transfer during a mass casualty exercise. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Joseph DeLuco)

A mass casualty event, by nature, is chaotic

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Military midwives as educators

Video
10/15/2018
Military midwives as educators

Within the military, midwives serve as educators. Kwuan Paruchabutr shares how midwives ensure that all medical staff are well trained in women's health care.

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

Sticks and stones can break bones – and so can osteoporosis

Article
10/11/2018
Master Sgt. Kimberly Kaminski, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, flips a 445-pound tire during a workout at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates. Resistance training is just one of many steps to take to fight osteoporosis. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ross A. Whitley)

Steps to take today to build a future of healthy bones

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Physical Activity | Women's Health

Military Midwives in Leadership Roles

Video
10/5/2018
Military Midwives in Leadership Roles

The duties of certified nurse midwives go far beyond the labor delivery room. Cmdr. Kim Shaughnessy explains how midwives hold leadership positions across the Military Health System and how they help shape women's health policy.

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

Mammograms recommended for early detection of breast cancer

Article
10/4/2018
Navy Chief Hospital Corpsman Naomi Perez, a certified mammogram technician, conducts a mammogram for a patient at Naval Hospital Pensacola. A mammogram is a low-dose x-ray procedure used to detect the early stages of breast cancer. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and NHP is taking the opportunity to educate patients about the dangers of breast cancer and the importance of getting checked. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brannon Deugan)

A mammogram is a low-dose x-ray used to detect the early stages of breast cancer

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Women's Health

Midwives in the Military

Video
10/3/2018
Midwives in the Military

Military midwives are key in the Department of Defense's priority of medical readiness. Army Lt. Col. Danielle Molinar shares ways midwives keep female soldiers ready to deploy.

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

A 'Pharmacy Phamily' team effort recognized at Naval Hospital Bremerton

Article
10/3/2018
Pharmacy technician Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Shealie Brown fills a prescription order in Naval Hospital Bremerton's Inpatient Pharmacy, part of the command's Pharmacy Department that along with Branch Health Clinics (BHC) Bangor, Everett and Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) pharmacies, has been selected for the 2018 Navy Pharmacy Team Award. (U.S. Navy photo by Douglas Stutz)

Naval Hospital Bremerton’s pharmacy selected for the 2018 Navy Pharmacy Team Award

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Robotics key to medical Airmen recruitment, retention, readiness

Article
10/2/2018
U.S. Air Force Maj. Scott Thallemer (foreground), 81st Surgical Operations Squadron Institute for Defense Robotic Surgical Education program coordinator, Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., and Air Force Maj. Joshua Tyler, InDoRSE program director, provide instruction to students during a robotics surgery training session at Keesler Air Force Base’s clinical research lab. (U.S. Air Fore photo by Kemberly Groue)

Robotics has been the standard for years in the private sector

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

DHA assumes management, administration of KMC

Article
10/2/2018
Air Force Col. Beatrice Dolihite, 81st Medical Group commander, briefs Keesler Medics on the Keesler Medical Center's transition to the Defense Health Agency during a commander's call at the Welch Theater on Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, Oct. 1, 2018. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

The Keesler Medical Center is the first hospital in the Air Force to transition

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Air Force begins transition of hospitals, clinics to the Defense Health Agency

Article
10/2/2018
Leaders of the Defense Health Agency and the U.S. Air Force Surgeon General discuss changes made to the 4th Medical Group’s new facility, Sept. 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Military medicine is changing to a single, integrated health system designed around patients and ensuring military medical readiness beginning in Oct. 1, 2018. Over time, the integration and standardization of healthcare will provide patients with a consistent, high-quality health care experience, no matter where they are. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob B. Derry)

From a patient perspective, most of these changes should go unnoticed

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Implementing Congressional Direction for Reform of the Military Health System

Policy

Policy Memorandum, signed by Deputy Secretary of Defense Patrick M. Shanahan, to direct implementation of the Military Health System (MHS) organizational reform required by the National Defense Authorization Act.

DHA IPM 18-008: Use of Medical Q Services (MQS) Contract by Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs)

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) through (d): - Instructs MTFs and servicing contracting offices to use the DHA MQS contracts for the procurement of health care staffing requirements for market segments of physician, nurse, dental, and ancillary contract services in the United States and its Territories. - Is effective immediately; it must be incorporated into a forthcoming change to DHA Procedural Instruction 6025.05 (Reference (g)). This DHA-IPM will expire effective 12 months from the date of issue.

Naval Hospital Jacksonville selected as first Navy facility to transition to DHA

Article
9/13/2018
Navy Lt. Jacob Balesi, a flight officer with Patrol Squadron Thirty, and his family visit Naval Hospital Jacksonville's pediatrics clinic. On Oct. 1, NH Jacksonville, including its five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia, will be the first Navy medical treatment facility to transition to the Defense Health Agency and establish a Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s staff across six locations stands ready to make this a seamless transition for patients

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Spine surgery team adds capability, improves readiness

Article
9/11/2018
Air Force Col. (Dr.) Edward Anderson, 99th Medical Group orthopedic spine surgeon, performs a lumbar microdiscectomy surgery at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. A lumbar microdiscectomy surgery is performed to remove a portion of a herniated disc in the lower back. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

The benefits of performing complex surgeries in the orthopedic spine clinic go far beyond the operating room

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 11

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.