Back to Top Skip to main content

New GERD treatment, first in DoD, performed at WBAMC

Army Maj. Michael Goldberg (left), chief, Gastroenterology, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, and Army Maj. Christopher Calcagno (right), gastroenterologist, WBAMC, speak to Army Staff Sgt. Mario Talavera (center), following the first incisionless fundoplication procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) performed in the Department of Defense, at WBAMC. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez) Army Maj. Michael Goldberg (left), chief, Gastroenterology, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, and Army Maj. Christopher Calcagno (right), gastroenterologist, WBAMC, speak to Army Staff Sgt. Mario Talavera (center), following the first incisionless fundoplication procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) performed in the Department of Defense, at WBAMC. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Texas — Recently, a new Food and Drug Administration approved incisionless procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was performed for the first time in a Department of Defense Military Treatment Facility here.

The procedure is an alternative for eligible patients looking to relieve symptoms associated with GERD through a non-surgical and possibly non-medicated approach.

“It’s a new procedure we’ve been trained on,” said Army Maj. Michael Goldberg, chief, Gastroenterology, WBAMC, who operated on the patient. “The benefits for the patient include a quicker recovery, no incisions, less of a chance of infection and less post-operation side effects such as pain.”

The introduction of the procedure was a relief for Army Staff Sgt. Mario Talavera who started suffering from GERD in 2008.

“(Nausea) was a daily event. Even if I just drank water, anything,” said Talavera.

The disease was impacting Talavera’s life both at work and with his family. Talavera underwent a laparoscopic surgical procedure which wrapped his stomach lining completely around his esophagus to prevent the reflux of gastric acid. Unfortunately, after years of relief, the wrap slipped.

Talavera tried different strategies to combat GERD from medication to changing his diet, nothing helped. When WBAMC doctors informed Talavera of the new incisionless procedure he agreed to the treatment.

“They walked me through everything that was going to happen and explained it to a T,” said Talavera.

 “The difference is, in surgery they need to go in (laparoscopically) and wrap the esophagus from the outside, but with (the new procedure) we can go through the mouth into the stomach, grab the top part of the stomach and fasten it around the esophagus,” said Goldberg. “(Talavera) was a good candidate because he continued to have heartburn symptoms and has had a prior surgery that he responded well to.”

According to Army Maj. Christopher Calcagno, gastroenterologist, WBAMC, while there are other procedures available to treat GERD, the new procedure is the most effective evidence-based procedure available for patients who meet certain criteria.

“Before this procedure there were only a few options, one was medications, another was surgery,” said Calcagno. “It’s another tool in treating reflux for the right patients and a good option.”

According to Goldberg, other differences include the ability to belch, where those who have had surgery may not be able to burp anymore and those with the new procedure may still do so.

“There’s a whole gap in the middle (of treatment options) where people didn’t want either medications or surgery, but still had symptoms that needed to be controlled,” said Calcagno. “This procedure fills in that gap.”

When asked if he felt any difference with his symptoms a day after the procedure, Talavera responded, “Oh yeah. It’s a whole lot of relief.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Medical Airman saves newborn minutes from death

Article
9/27/2017
Senior Airman Taylor Scherff, 55th Medical Group Pediatric Clinic medical technician, takes Isabelle Kittel’s temperature as her mom, Casey, holds her Sept. 12, 2017 in the Ehrling Bergquist Clinic, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Rachelle Blake)

If Airman Scherff hadn’t caught the abnormalities in the baby when she first encountered her, the baby very likely would have passed away prior to receiving care

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

A Family's Smile

Video
9/27/2017
A Family's Smile

Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Kerry Latham restored quality of life to Killian McKinney, a baby with a cleft lip and palate, during a plastic surgery procedure at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda Md., Aug. 28, 2017. By treating McKinney, Latham supported the McKinney military family and enabled them to focus on the mission.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Naval Hospital Oak Harbor first Navy hospital to pilot new electronic health record

Article
8/4/2017
Navy Seaman Joseph White and wife Lauren with their first child, Avalee. Avalee is the first infant born in a military hospital using the Department of Defense's new joint electronic health record, MHS GENESIS. (U.S. Navy photo by Patricia Rose)

Naval Hospital Oak Harbor was selected as the first Navy hospital to deploy MHS GENESIS, and has been successfully using the program since July 15

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS

MHS Online Transparency Site launch

Article
7/20/2017
Patients who use military hospitals and clinics will find it easier to see how their facility is performing thanks to June 28 changes by the Military Health System to its transparency website. (MHS graphic)

Recent changes put ratings at beneficiary fingertips through simple online clicks

Recommended Content:

MHS Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Information (for Patients) | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

In the zone at WBAMC's inpatient wards

Article
7/17/2017
Usa Thompson, staff nurse, Surgical Ward, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, measures medication while donning a visual aid designed to limit interactions and distractions while administering medications. Inpatient Wards at WBAMC implemented distraction-free designated times and other initiatives to proactively combat potential for error in missed or incorrect medications. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Inpatient Wards have proactively implemented a distraction-free designated time dubbed, Medzone

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Patient Safety

Military telepain clinics in D.C. area help patients manage pain

Article
6/7/2017
Dr. Christopher Spevak, director of the opioid safety program for the National Capital Region in and around Washington, D.C., uses the telehealth equipment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. (DoD photo by Kalila Fleming)

Being able to see your doctor without being in the same room, or even the same hospital, is giving some Military Health System beneficiaries more access to care; and it’s helping the MHS manage its opioid usage

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Airmen, Sailors support life-saving mission

Article
5/25/2017
Air Force Staff Sgt. Angel Figueroa, 18th Medical Operations Squadron technician, (left) and Maj. Melissa Dassinger, 18th Aerospace Evacuation Squadron Training Flight commander, test a “Giraffe” omnibed at Kadena Air Base, Japan. A C-17 Globemaster III can be equipped with materials and systems required to transport injured patients across great distances quickly and safely. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Quay Drawdy)

Airmen and Sailors worked together to outfit a C-17 Globemaster III with life-saving equipment

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Innovation | Technology

New medical practice restores function for trauma, cancer patients

Article
5/18/2017
Army Lt. Col. Owen Johnson III (left), chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Service, and Dr. Khang Thai, plastic surgeon, WBAMC, utilize a microscope during a microvascular transplant or "free flap" surgery as part of WBAMC's Reconstructive Microsurgery Program. Reconstructive microsurgery is a new practice to WBAMC and includes the autologous transfer of tissue, nerves and bone to trauma, cancer, or birth-related defected areas of patients, restoring function to the affected area. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

The launch of the Reconstructive Microsurgery Program is the latest in reconstructive surgery advances

Recommended Content:

Innovation | Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Program offers holistic recovery tools to Soldiers with TBI

Article
5/9/2017
MIST Program participants engage in traditional and nontraditional therapies, such as creating symbolic masks. The MIST Program offers holistic treatment to service members with traumatic brain injuries and other traumatic conditions. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)

The holistic focus of MIST recognizes that the whole person is affected by brain injuries and the conditions that often accompany them

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Mental Health Care | Traumatic Brain Injury | Mental Wellness

Secretary Shulkin meets service dogs Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin talks with Providers about Prosthetics

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin tours Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Belvoir Hospital offers cutting-edge liver cancer treatment

Article
4/25/2017
For patients battling cancer, quality of life is most often achieved through treatment options. At Belvoir Hospital, a new localized option – the first of its kind for any military hospital on the East Coast – is giving patients with liver tumors another choice to enhance their quality of life. (Department of Defense photo by Reese Brown)

Belvoir Hospital is giving patients with liver tumors another choice to enhance their quality of life

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Technology

Keesler Medical Center surgeons implant Air Force's first Micra Pacemaker

Article
4/21/2017
Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Pacemakers are the most common way to treat bradycardia and restore the heart's normal rhythm by sending electrical impulses to increase heart rate

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 9

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.