Back to Top Skip to main content

Nutrition centers improve health readiness

Patient care is at the core of multi-service market nutrition centers. These centers provide a range of services to meet individual patient needs within the military health community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nathan Byrnes.) Patient care is at the core of multi-service market nutrition centers. These centers provide a range of services to meet individual patient needs within the military health community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nathan Byrnes.)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Multi-Service Markets | Nutrition | Health Readiness

Imagine being a hospital patient with food allergies and other dietary restrictions. Then imagine the other 300 patients in the facility, many with special nutritional needs. Every one of you needs three nutritious meals each day. While this is a challenge for the Military Health System, it is its own specialty for six large nutrition centers located around the United States.

A multiserve market is a cluster of military hospitals and clinics, run by different service branches, located in a specified geographical area and offering overlapping services. There are 11 such markets in the United States and four overseas. Six of these markets are considered “enhanced" multiservice markets, or eMSMs, because of overall size, medical mission, and graduate medical education capacity. The six eMSMs are located in Colorado Springs; the National Capitol Region; Oahu, Hawaii; Puget Sound, Washington; San Antonio, Texas; and Tidewater, Virginia.

Navy Lt. Elaina Virostko is the chief of clinical nutrition at Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in northern Virginia, part of the National Capital Region eMSM. Virostko said eMSM nutrition centers can benefit patients with a variety of requirements and diagnoses because of the large volume of expertise and services available. “We try to the best of our ability to make sure we’re meeting our patients’ needs.”

Nutrition centers are staffed with dietitians who work behind the scenes to train students or manage operations with the mission of preparing healthy and cost-effective meals for patients and staff. Dietitians and exercise physiologists also work with outpatients to develop personalized goals for weight loss, healthy eating, and prevention of heart disease and other chronic conditions.

“We have a big work load, but we have a hard-working and professional staff to share that expertise,” said Army Maj. Trisha Brooke Stavinoha, chief of patient room service at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio.

Managing meal prep for more than 300 inpatients and factoring in dietary restrictions, allergies or nutritional needs, is a large responsibility, said Stavinoha. BAMC’s Patient Room Service Branch has approximately 65 staff members on board to help with patient meals. They include cooks, call center personnel, and expeditors who ensure that the cooked orders are delivered in a timely fashion.

At BAMC, inpatient and outpatient care is integrated, allowing an outpatient dietitian to continue the care provided by an inpatient dietitian, including reviewing the electronic health record to continue the plan of care and monitor goals, said Stavinoha. A multiservice market area also gives patients the benefit of consulting a provider at one location and then getting lab work done at a location closer to home.

“Patient care is at the center of what we do,” said Stavinoha. “We work to make a positive difference in people’s lives throughout the entire spectrum of care.”

You also may be interested in...

Military health care transitions to new life support training provider

Article
2/20/2019
Navy Chief Petty Officer Wendy Wright, a hospital corpsman chief assigned to Expeditionary Medical Facility Great Lakes in Illinois, performs ventilation techniques on a practice mannequin while participating in a life support simulation in Savannah, Georgia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Caila Arahood)

American Red Cross courses better suited to military needs

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Emergency Preparedness and Response

The simple – and complicated – task of shoveling snow

Article
2/5/2019
Army Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Seifridsberger shovels knee-deep snow to build a simulated hasty firing position during training exercise Ready Force Breach at Fort Drum, New York. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew Carroll)

When in the throes of winter weather, there are ways to prepare for a successful, injury-free snow shoveling activity

Recommended Content:

Winter Safety | Reserve Health Readiness Program | Health Readiness | Physical Activity

Army Medicine joins forces with civilian hospitals to sustain medical readiness

Article
1/31/2019
Army Brig. Gen. Telita Crosland, RHC-Atlantic Commanding General, signs letter of commitment Jan. 18 recognizing the partnership between Army Medicine and Cooper University Health Care to provide advanced surgical trauma training allowing Army medical professionals to sustain their trauma skills by working alongside civilian counterparts at high-volume Level 1 trauma centers. Cooper joins the Oregon Health & Science University as one of the two trauma centers partnering with Army Medicine. (Courtesy photo by Cooper University Health Care )

The AMCT3 program addresses the 2017 NDAA directive for the Military Health System to establish partnerships to maintain trauma care competency

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Civil Military Medicine

Acute Flaccid Myelitis Case Reporting

Infographic
1/29/2019
Acute Flaccid Myelitis Case Reporting

This case highlights important clinical characteristics of acute flaccid myelitis and emphasizes the importance of including AFM in the differential diagnosis when evaluating active duty service members and Military Health System beneficiaries presenting with paralysis.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Cardiovascular disease-related medical evacuations

Infographic
1/29/2019
Cardiovascular disease-related medical evacuations

This descriptive analysis summarizes the demographic characteristics, counts, rates and temporal trends for Cardiovascular disease-related medical evacuations from the CENTCOM area of responsibility. In addition, the percentage of those evacuated who had received pre-deployment diagnoses indicating cardiovascular risk is summarized. Responses to ...

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Infographic
1/29/2019
HPV

At the time of this report, there were no published studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) incidence over time among active component U.S. military personnel. Examining the incidence rates of NAFLD and their temporal trends among active component U.S. military members can provide insights into the future burden of NAFLD on the MHS.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Transformation underway across the Military Health System

Article
1/29/2019
Thomas McCaffery, principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, with Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director, Defense Health Agency, celebrated the Defense Health Agency's fifth anniversary on Oct. 1, 2018, by welcoming the first military hospitals and clinics transitioning to the DHA. This was first step for the MHS to emerge as a more integrated and efficient system of health and readiness. (MHS photo by Military Heath System Strategic Communications Division)

All of these changes – the Military Health System transformation, MHS GENESIS, TRICARE enhancements – are aimed at taking the DoD’s health enterprise to the next level

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | Health Readiness | TRICARE Health Program | MHS GENESIS | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune becomes first Level III trauma center in the Navy

Article
1/24/2019
(Left to right) Navy Rear Admiral Terry Moulton, Deputy Surgeon General, Navy Capt. Jeffrey Timby, NMCCL Commanding Officer, and Adam Caldwell, Regional Representative for US Senator Thom Tillis, cut the ceremonial ribbon for the NMCCL Trauma Center. (Courtesy photo)

NMCCL’s Trauma Center is the first trauma center in the Navy to service community trauma patients

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Growing Air Force’s space medicine culture

Article
1/23/2019
Medical Airmen assigned to U.S. Air Force Space Command are charged with delivering care to the Airmen who launch, monitor and operate the Air Force’s satellite systems. As space continues to play an increasingly critical role in our nation’s defense, medical Airmen in AFSPC are also preparing for the future of space medicine. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The role of AFSPC medics to ensure space operators are medically ready to complete their mission

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

2019 TRICARE Winter Safety Kit

Infographic
1/22/2019
TRICARE Winter Safety Kit 2019

This infographic provides tips and information about staying safe and warm during a snow storm.

Recommended Content:

Winter Safety | Health Readiness | Preventive Health

Beneficiaries offer the gift of life through kidney donation

Article
1/22/2019
Air Force Col. Dave Ashley (second from left) and Army veteran Chris Connelly, seen here with their wives, are both happy and healthy after Ashley donated a kidney to Connelly. (Courtesy photo)

More than a third of transplant patients unrelated to their donors

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

A new year marks a new you

Article
1/18/2019
Navy Reserve Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center, Phoenix perform a 1.5-mile run during the physical readiness test at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale, Arizona. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 3rd Class Drew Verbis)

Changes in lifestyle don’t have to be drastic to be effective

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Physical Activity

Medical team saves newborn’s life

Article
1/15/2019
Maria Ortiz, registered nurse, Labor and Delivery Section, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, checks vitals on Vanessa Torres, a laboring mom, as part of daily operations at WBAMC’s L&D section. Recently, Ortiz and other staff members quickly responded to an umbilical cord prolapse, an obstetrical emergency, at WBAMC resulting in the successful delivery of a baby, despite the life-threatening complication. (U.S. Army photo)

Staff quickly respond to the obstetrical emergency via an emergency cesarean section

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

'Fused' technologies give 3D view of prostate during biopsy

Article
1/9/2019
Eisenhower Army Medical Center graphic

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men

Recommended Content:

Men's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Preventive Health

CJTH continues to provide superior care for U.S., coalition forces

Article
1/7/2019
A medical team transports a patient by a stretcher to Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 10, 2018. Before entering the hospital, patients are thoroughly assessed, administratively in-processed and checked for any explosive ordnance or weapons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaylee Dubois)

With a 99.3-percent survival rate, the hospital staff have reason to be proud

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 43

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.