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To salt or not to salt?

Most Americans get more than 75% of their sodium from prepared and processed foods, including tomato sauce, soups, gravies, canned foods, bread, frozen pizzas, snack foods, and salad dressings. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus McCloud) Most Americans get more than 75% of their sodium from prepared and processed foods, including tomato sauce, soups, gravies, canned foods, bread, frozen pizzas, snack foods, and salad dressings. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus McCloud)

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Sodium – found in table salt, kosher salt, and most sea salts – is an essential mineral your body uses to control blood pressure, help your muscles and nerves work properly, and balance fluids. However, it’s important to watch your sodium intake because it can increase your risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and some cancers.

On average, Americans (ages 1 and older) consume more than 3,400 mg of sodium every day, mostly in the form of salt. But the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that adults limit their sodium intake to less than 2,300 mg per day, or roughly the amount in one teaspoon of table salt. The Guidelines also recommend that those who are “salt-sensitive” – older adults, African Americans, and people with obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease – limit their sodium intake to about 1,500 mg per day.

Most Americans get more than 75% of their sodium from prepared and processed foods, including tomato sauce, soups, gravies, canned foods, bread, frozen pizzas, snack foods, and salad dressings. Sodium adds flavor and helps preserve prepared foods. It enhances food color and gives it a firmer texture too. Many restaurant foods also are high in sodium, but you can choose low-sodium items when they’re available.

What’s the best way to reduce your sodium intake?

  • Eat whole foods such as fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, lean meats, poultry, fish, unsalted nuts and seeds, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products.
  • Check the Nutrition Facts panel on all packaged-food labels to compare sodium amounts in foods and drinks.
  • Choose low-sodium, reduced-sodium, or no-salt-added products whenever possible.

Check with your healthcare provider or registered dietitian about whether you need to reduce your salt intake. To learn more about how to reduce sodium in your diet, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web page.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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