Back to Top Skip to main content

Summertime food safety

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. To avoid this, follow good cooking tips. Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. To avoid this, follow good cooking tips. Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety | Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Picnics and barbecues are just around the corner, so be mindful of food safety as you soak up the summer sun and fun. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates one in six Americans get sick from foodborne illnesses, including those associated with poorly cooked or stored foods in hot environments. Still, there are ways to keep your favorite foods safe – and your friends and loved ones healthy – this summer.

  • Keep it clean. Wash your hands with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds before and after handling uncooked eggs or raw meat, poultry, and seafood (and their juices). To prevent cross-contamination, wash utensils and cutting boards with hot, soapy water after food prep too. 
  • Tip: Fill a spray bottle with one tablespoon chlorine bleach and water, and use it to sanitize your countertops and other food-prep surfaces.
  • Cool it. Thaw frozen foods in the refrigerator, not on the countertop. Safely marinate your meats, poultry, and seafood in the refrigerator until it’s time to cook. Don’t reuse marinade, and don’t serve it with cooked foods.
  • Cook foods thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to check for doneness. Make sure cooked foods have reached a safe internal temperature:
    • Fresh beef, pork, veal, and lamb (steaks, roasts, and chops) – 145°F
    • Fresh fish – 145°F
    • Ground beef, pork, veal, and lamb (burgers and sausages) – 160°F
    • All poultry and pre-cooked meats (such as hot dogs) – 165°F
  • Refrigerate your leftovers. Chill your foods to stop the growth of bacteria that can cause foodborne illnesses. Refrigerate items within two hours of cooking or one hour if the outside temperature is at or above 90°F. 
  • Tip: If you’re outside, keep things chilled at 40°F or less in a cooler, or place them directly on ice.

To boost your “BBQ IQ,” visit the CDC webpage.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Sticks and stones can break bones – and so can osteoporosis

Article
10/11/2018
Master Sgt. Kimberly Kaminski, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, flips a 445-pound tire during a workout at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates. Resistance training is just one of many steps to take to fight osteoporosis. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ross A. Whitley)

Steps to take today to build a future of healthy bones

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Physical Activity | Women's Health

Army researchers develop tasty, healthy performance bar

Article
9/4/2018
Two U.S. Army soldiers eat a version of the Performance Readiness Bar. USARIEM researchers will monitor them to test whether the bar affects bone density. (U.S. Army photo by Mr. David Kamm)

Researchers aren’t working to provide recruits and soldiers with something that only tastes good; it has to make sense for their nutrition

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Nutrition

Don't let the bugs bite

Article
8/2/2018
Using an insect repellent spray can be an important measure in guarding against bites from fleas, ticks and mosquitoes this summer.

Most parents do a good job of protecting their kids from the sun, but they also need to consider why it's important to guard against potentially harmful insect bites and stings

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Summer Safety | Bug Week 2018: What's the Buzz All About?

The things head lice carry: Stigma and hassle, but no harm

Article
7/31/2018
Lice are parasitic insects that can be found on people’s heads, and bodies. Human lice survive by feeding on human blood. (EPA photo)

Lice – a common affliction in school children – are gross but harmless

Recommended Content:

Bug Week 2018: What's the Buzz All About? | Public Health | Summer Safety

Preparing for travel can prevent illness

Article
7/18/2018
Experts encourage overseas travelers to seek advice from a health care provider before leaving on a trip, and to make sure recommended vaccinations are up to date (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. De-Juan Haley)

Experts encourage travelers to be proactive about their travel medicine needs, including learning about the health risks associated with the destination and checking with their doctor to make sure they’re in good health

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health | Immunizations | Summer Safety

Army entomology experts: Don’t get bitten

Article
7/16/2018
The lone star tick is the most common tick found in the southeastern U.S. One of the first things people can do to prevent a tick bite is to recognize tick habitats, and avoid them. (U.S. Army photo by Graham Snodgrass)

The best way to ensure you don't get sick is to not get bitten

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety | Bug Week 2018: What's the Buzz All About?

Summer travel: Getting care while overseas

Article
7/10/2018
 Summer vacation is the start of travel season for many military families.

When traveling overseas, you should know what to do in the event of illness or other health issues

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Health Program | Summer Safety

Summer Safety 2018 Hydration Safety

Infographic
7/10/2018
This infographic provides information on ways to stay hydrated while out in the sun.

This infographic provides information on ways to stay hydrated while out in the sun.

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety

Summer safety: Preventing firework burns

Article
7/3/2018
Fireworks fill the sky on July 8, 2017 at Offutt’s base lake during the annual fireworks display. Several family activities took place at the celebration including face painting, a treasure hunt and a performance from the Heartland of America Band. (U.S. Air Force photo by Zachary Hada)

If your patriotic celebration includes self-starter fireworks or hand-held sparklers, take precautions to avoid injury.

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety

Heat-related illnesses

Infographic
6/27/2018
Heat-Related Illnesses

Tips to prevent heat-related illnesses

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety

Sports drinks: What are you really putting in your body?

Article
6/27/2018
Generally our bodies are comprised of approximately 60 to 70 percent water. We need water for digestion, energy and oxygen transport, and temperature regulation. Senior Airman Johanna Magner, 22nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, drinks water on the flightline in front of a KC-135 Stratotanker. With rising temperatures during the summer months people are encouraged to drink more water to stay hydrated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jenna K. Caldwell)

In general, sports drinks are typically a calculated blend of carbohydrates, electrolytes and water

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Summer Safety

Summer safety: Tips to prevent food poisoning

Article
6/22/2018
Consider your food safely cooked when the internal temperature gets high enough to kill germs. You can check the temperature of your food by using a food thermometer. (U.S. Navy file photo)

Summer safety: Tips to prevent food poisoning

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety

Summer Safety 2018 Mosquito Safety

Infographic
6/20/2018
This infographic provides information on ways to protect yourself from harmful mosquito bites.

This infographic provides information on ways to protect yourself from harmful mosquito bites.

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

Five tips for protecting your skin from the sun

Article
6/18/2018
You have many options for protecting your skin while outdoors in the sun, including protecting your eyes and the skin around your eyes by wearing sunglasses. (U.S. Air Force file photo)

You have many options for protecting your skin while outdoors in the sun

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety

Summer Safety 2018 Water Safety

Infographic
6/16/2018
This infographic provides information on ways to protect yourself while you're in or near water.

This infographic provides information on ways to protect yourself while you're in or near water.

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 7

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.