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Eat a rainbow of colorful produce

For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes. (U.S. Army photo by Honey Nixon) For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes. (U.S. Army photo by Honey Nixon)

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Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Power your performance with colorful produce! Eating colorful fruits and veggies can help reduce your risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers too. They also contain water, electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, and carbohydrates – all essential nutrients for top performance in the gym or on the field.

Eat your greens and other colors in the produce “rainbow.”

  • Think pink. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that gives fruits and vegetables their red color, and it might reduce your risk of heart disease and some cancers. Enjoy lycopene-rich foods such as watermelon, pink grapefruit, and tomatoes.
  • Enjoy orange. Many yellow and orange vegetables and fruits get their color from beta-carotene. It’s an antioxidant that can reduce your risk of headaches, high blood pressure, and more. Choose sweet potatoes, mangoes, peaches, and others.
  • Get right with white. These fruits and vegetables contain potassium, fiber, and other nutrients. Fiber-filled fruits and vegetables can help lower your risk of obesity too. White produce includes bananas, white corn, cauliflower, and pears.
  • Pick purple. These vegetables and fruits get their color from anthocyanins, which is a powerful phytonutrient that might reduce your risk of chronic disease. Enjoy purple berries, grapes, eggplants, and more.

For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes.

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