Back to Top Skip to main content

Eat a rainbow of colorful produce

For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes. (U.S. Army photo by Honey Nixon) For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes. (U.S. Army photo by Honey Nixon)

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Power your performance with colorful produce! Eating colorful fruits and veggies can help reduce your risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers too. They also contain water, electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, and carbohydrates – all essential nutrients for top performance in the gym or on the field.

Eat your greens and other colors in the produce “rainbow.”

  • Think pink. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that gives fruits and vegetables their red color, and it might reduce your risk of heart disease and some cancers. Enjoy lycopene-rich foods such as watermelon, pink grapefruit, and tomatoes.
  • Enjoy orange. Many yellow and orange vegetables and fruits get their color from beta-carotene. It’s an antioxidant that can reduce your risk of headaches, high blood pressure, and more. Choose sweet potatoes, mangoes, peaches, and others.
  • Get right with white. These fruits and vegetables contain potassium, fiber, and other nutrients. Fiber-filled fruits and vegetables can help lower your risk of obesity too. White produce includes bananas, white corn, cauliflower, and pears.
  • Pick purple. These vegetables and fruits get their color from anthocyanins, which is a powerful phytonutrient that might reduce your risk of chronic disease. Enjoy purple berries, grapes, eggplants, and more.

For adults, the current daily recommendation is 2-3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit. Remember that raw, cooked, steamed, grilled, and broiled varieties all count, so fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables at mealtimes.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Sleep cycles

Article
6/22/2016
U.S. Army Rangers, rest for a moment in between events during the Best Ranger Competition 2016, at Fort Benning, Ga., April 16, 2016. The competition is a three-day event consisting of challenges that test competitor's physical, mental, and technical capabilities. The Rangers compete for nearly sixty hours with little or no sleep, and must rest intermittently for minutes at a time while waiting to begin their next event. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Justin P. Morelli)

You’ll feel more rested waking up at the end of a sleep cycle

Recommended Content:

Sleep | Human Performance Resource Center

Blisters: Sock it to ‘em

Article
6/21/2016
Blisters result from a combination of friction and moisture. They’ve been blamed on shoe fit or lacing style, but scientific research has shown this isn’t necessarily the case. If friction and moisture are causing problems, then wearing proper socks can bring relief.

Blisters are common among service members and athletes

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Physical Activity

Supplements to boost your T

Article
6/16/2016
Testosterone booster dietary supplement products claim to increase the male sex hormone testosterone, which affects muscle strength. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Robert Cloys)

Testosterone booster dietary supplement products claim to increase the male hormone testosterone

Recommended Content:

Men's Health | Human Performance Resource Center

Practice safe sun

Article
6/7/2016
Wear sunglasses to cover the skin around your eyes and help prevent eye damage. Marine Staff Sgt. Pablo Nieto sweeps a compound during a patrol near Patrol Base Boldak.

Ultraviolet rays and can damage your skin after only 15 minutes of exposure

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Summer Safety

Gluten-free: Is it the right choice for you?

Article
5/31/2016
(Courtesy graphic)

Some people feel that eating gluten-free foods will help them lose weight faster and give them more energy

Recommended Content:

Nutrition

What’s the deal with DHEA?

Article
5/27/2016
DHEA Pills

DHEA is a steroid hormone that the human body produces naturally

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center

Helmets save lives

Article
5/26/2016
Motorcycle safety classes provide safe riding strategies. For example, the U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence offers safety courses for active duty, reserve, and guard members. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Nathan Knapke)

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2014 alone, more than 4,500 motorcyclists were killed in motor-vehicle accidents

Recommended Content:

Summer Safety | Human Performance Resource Center

Lower-back pain? Try yoga

Article
5/20/2016
Navy Master-At-Arms 2nd Class Nichole Lowery instructs Sailors during a sunrise yoga session on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore. Practicing yoga and yoga stretches can be a great short-term way to reduce the length, intensity, and frequency of lower-back pain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chris Liaghat)

Practicing yoga and yoga stretches can be a great short-term way to reduce the length, intensity, and frequency of lower-back pain

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Integrative Wellness | Physical Activity

Stimulants - Are you up to speed?

Infographic
5/19/2016
Operation Supplement Safety infographic about stimulants

Get up to speed and check out the new OPSS infographic with information on what you need to know about these dietary supplement ingredients

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Human Performance Resource Center | Nutrition

What surface is best for running?

Article
5/17/2016
Sailors, along with embarked Marines from the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit assigned to the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard, run on the ship's flight deck.

The jury’s still out on whether running on a softer surface has less impact on joints and muscles

Recommended Content:

Human Performance Resource Center | Physical Activity

Dietary supplements and women’s health

Article
5/10/2016
Intense daily physical training, such as during basic training, increases your calcium and iron needs and has been associated with lower levels of vitamin D in the blood.

Military training and pregnancy, both increase women’s nutritional needs, specifically for vitamin D, calcium, iron, folate, and iodine

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center | Women's Health

FDA says no to methylsynephrine

Article
4/26/2016
If you’re considering taking a dietary supplement with methylsynephrine or oxilofrine on the label, you might want to think twice.

The FDA recently announced that methylsynephrine does not meet the statutory definition of a dietary supplement ingredient

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Human Performance Resource Center | Operation Live Well

Healthcare to Health program aims to enhance the diet, activity level of military children

Article
4/20/2016
A group of children play inside of a bounce house.

Initiative designed to encourage military children to become more active, and make healthy lifestyle choices

Recommended Content:

Nutrition | Physical Activity | Children's Health

Army's Research Institute conducts MRE study to improve gut health

Article
4/19/2016
For the first time, researchers from the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine are finding ways to leverage gut bacteria, like in the picture above, in warfighters to help prevent gastrointestinal illnesses during deployment and training.

The Army is is studying ways to improve gut health and prevent gastrointestinal illness among Soldiers operating in austere environments

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Nutrition

Spring allergies? Or just a cold?

Article
4/15/2016
Allergies come from sensitivity to “allergens” such as seasonal pollen, and they’re not contagious. Common allergens in spring include plant pollens. (Courtesy photo)

Both colds and seasonal allergies make you feel miserable, but you can take steps to avoid or at least take the edge off them

Recommended Content:

Conditions and Treatments | Public Health | Human Performance Resource Center
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 8

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.