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Men need to take control of their health

Lt. Cmdr. David Griffin, a urologist at Naval Hospital Pensacola, discusses a treatment plan with a patient in the Urology Clinic. Some of the common conditions seen at the clinic include male infertility, sexual health, kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urologic cancers, blood in the urine, urinary problems, vasectomies and more. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz) Navy Lt. Cmdr. David Griffin (left), a urologist at Naval Hospital Pensacola, discusses a treatment plan with a patient in the Urology Clinic. Some of the common conditions seen at the clinic include male infertility, sexual health, kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urologic cancers, blood in the urine, urinary problems, vasectomies and more. (U.S. Navy photo by Jason Bortz)

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NAVAL HOSPITAL PENSACOLA, Fla. — A visit to the urologist is not something most men look forward to, but results can range from improved sexual health to early detection of cancer.

June is Men’s Health Month and Naval Hospital Pensacola’s Urology Clinic reminds men of the importance of regular medical exams and to take control of their health care. 

The clinic provides treatment for conditions of kidney, bladder and male reproductive organs. Some of the common conditions include male infertility, sexual health, kidney stones, urinary tract infections, urologic cancers, blood in the urine, urinary problems, vasectomies and more. 

“The majority of patients that we see are men,” said Navy Lt. Cmdr. David Griffin, NHP urologist. “Unfortunately, men are not always comfortable talking about their health.”

Topics such as trouble urinating or sexual performance may be hard topics for some men to discuss, but they are all common problems that the clinic sees on a regular basis. 

“Men have to actively take care of themselves,” said Griffin. “If you are having a problem, talk to your physician about it and get the treatment needed.”

While topics such as frequent urination or erectile dysfunction may be hard for some men to talk about, urologic cancers should be a topic all men should be willing to discuss with their physician. Early detection of testicular or prostate cancer will lead to better treatments and outcomes for patients.

For testicular cancer, men should perform regular self-exams while showering. If a lump or something unusual is discovered, an appointment should be made to see a physician. 

Men should also let their physician know if they have any family history of prostate cancer and have a prostate exam when they turn 55. Signs that a man may have an issue with his prostate include frequent urination, difficulties urinating or blood in the urine. These signs could be due to an enlarged prostate, which is another reason to visit the Urology Clinic.

Another common condition seen at the clinic is kidney stones. Some people just naturally develop kidney stones, but dehydration and diets high in protein and sodium can also cause them.

“Dehydration can cause kidney stones, especially in high heat climates like Florida,” said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Bradley Blackwell, a urology technician at NHP. “You need to drink lots of water to flush the salts and calcium from your system.”

Men need to take control of their health, not just during Men’s Health Month but year round. If urologic symptoms appear for men or women, they should make an appointment with their physician. It could be something simple or it could be something that can cause long-term health problems.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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