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Improve your mental health with time away from work

A sailor assigned to U.S. Naval Support Facility Diego Garcia relaxes by sailing on a Pico sailboat near the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Marina. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan B. Tabios) A sailor assigned to U.S. Naval Support Facility Diego Garcia relaxes by sailing on a Pico sailboat near the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Marina. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ryan B. Tabios)

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Mental Health Care | Mental Wellness

If you caught the flu or broke your arm, you would probably take time off to rest and recover. Your mental health requires the same amount of care and attention. While taking a day off may present challenges, especially if you’re on active-duty, planning a vacation is a good way to maximize mental health self-care. Studies show that taking time off can benefit you and your loved ones. It can also increase your work performance and job satisfaction.

You may think that you can’t afford to take time off, but overworking yourself can be worse for your mental health. Most of us build up stress day to day, and constant stress can have negative impacts on your health, including:

  • Difficulty concentrating on everyday tasks
  • Frequent headaches
  • Difficulty remembering things
  • Anxiety
  • Increased risk of substance abuse and over-eating
  • Impaired judgment
  • Increased irritability
  • Depression

Finding the time to recharge can help minimize the negative effects of stress, and improve your performance when you do return to work. A few tips for making the most of your time off include:

If possible, try to engage your supervisor or line leader about the importance of taking time off. Real Warriors has tools for leaders that you can share to spread awareness about the importance of mental health. Good self-care can benefit both the individual and improve their ability to work at peak performance.

Visit the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury blog for more articles on how to take care of your mental health.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) through (g): • Assigns responsibilities and provides instructions for implementing Reference (d), which requires an MHA for Service members prior to separation in accordance with References (e) through (g). • Is effective immediately; it will be incorporated into DHA-Procedural Instruction xxxx.xx, “Separation History and Physical Examination.” This DHA-IPM will expire effective 12 months from the date of issue.

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