Back to Top Skip to main content

Navy, international entomologists collaborate to fight malaria

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sutherland, technical director for the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence, sprays insecticide at the Centro De Atención Mis Años Dorados, a local nursing home, during Southern Partnership Station 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brittney Cannady) Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ian Sutherland, technical director for the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence, sprays insecticide at the Centro De Atención Mis Años Dorados, a local nursing home, during Southern Partnership Station 17. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brittney Cannady)

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Malaria

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The principal tasks of the malaria reduction efforts directed by the President's Malaria Initiative include distributing insecticide-treated bed nets, indoor residual spraying and anti-malarial drugs. While the United States Agency for International Development oversees the initiative, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is tasked with providing scientific and technical leadership as well as implementing public health programs vital to stopping malaria.

Recently, the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence has taken an important role in furthering the PMI’s goals to reduce malaria.

“Navy entomologists work around the globe supporting research and vector control programs that enhance the force health protection of U.S. and partner militaries as well as the general public health of host countries we operate in, so it’s a natural fit for NECE” said Navy Capt. Jeffrey Stancil, commander of the NECE.

“Navy entomologists stationed at the CDC have been involved with PMI for several years,” he said. “At NECE, we are honored to have been asked to join this team battling the world’s deadliest foe and support the United States Africa Command and Navy Medicine’s Global Health Engagement missions, develop partnerships across the GHE spectrum and ensure the operational readiness of our own personnel.”

New Consultants in Cameroon, Uganda

In July, NECE entomologist Navy Lt. Cmdr. Joseph Diclaro was selected to serve as the PMI entomology consultant for Uganda working closely with both the CDC and the Ugandan Ministry of Health to ensure that bed nets are being effectively distributed and IRS is properly exterminating mosquitoes.

Before he was at the NECE, Diclaro was stationed at Navy Medical Research Unit 3 in Cairo and Accra, Ghana, for five years where he studied vector-borne disease throughout West Africa. During the 2014 Ebola outbreak, he was instrumental in overseeing the Navy’s response in Liberia working directly with the Minister of Health and the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research.

Since his appointment to PMI, Diclaro has already made two extended trips to Uganda to provide technical expertise to the Uganda National Malaria Program. On his last trip, he worked with Ugandan Ministry of Health vector control officers for an annual insecticide resistance study that provides critical data to determine the best insecticide to use for IRS operations. While in-country, he trained 40 nursing students at the Arua School of Comprehensive Nursing and Midwifery of Uganda on mosquito biology and control.

Since malaria mortality has decreased as a direct result of the program, USAID recently added five new countries to PMI -- four of which are Francophone. This has led to a critical need for French-speaking entomologists and another opportunity for NECE to contribute.

NECE entomologist Navy Lt. Matthew Montgomery has recently been named the PMI entomology consultant for Cameroon. In addition to his proficiency in French, Montgomery brings years of operational and GHE knowledge to the PMI. In the last two years at NECE, Montgomery has worked to enhance vector control programs in Fiji, Micronesia, Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Liberia.

Both Diclaro’s and Montgomery’s roles in the PMI will allow them to build important personal relationships with public health workers in their respective countries and to develop long-term local expertise. Their impact on both Cameroon and Uganda will be measured in malaria case reduction and, consequently, the number of lives saved.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

UK-US partnership to advance interoperability between military medical services

Article
11/9/2017
Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery signs a Task Force Charter with the acting Surgeon General of the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence, Major General Martin Bricknell, continuing a UK-US partnership to advance interoperability between military medical services. McCaffery reaffirmed that the partnership enables both countries to better equip our Armed Forces community with the best possible medical support and capabilities for service personnel, veterans, and their families. By sharing information and developing opportunities for combined training and collaborative research, the United States and United Kingdom are committed to advancing military medical services and working side-by-side in defense of global interests.

Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery signs a Task Force Charter with the acting Surgeon General of the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence, Major General Martin Bricknell, continuing a UK-US partnership to advance interoperability between military medical services.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Strengthening capabilities, fostering partnership top priorities at global health summit

Article
10/27/2017
Admiral Tim Ziemer, head of U.S. delegation, giving remarks at the Global Health Security Agenda Ministerial Meeting in Kampala, Uganda.

A growing partnership of more than 60 nations is working to build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Security Agenda

Partnerships, collaboration essential in global fight against health threats

Article
7/28/2017
Dr. David Smith (second from the right) was part of a panel discussing the national security implications of epidemics during amfAR’s recent conference in Washington, D.C. Other panelists included, from left to right, Rear Adm. Anne Schuchat, acting director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Ron Klain, former White House Ebola response coordinator and executive vice president, Revolution, LLC; Dr. Smith; Ambassador James Glassman, former undersecretary for Public Diplomacy, U.S. Department of State; and moderator Judy Woodruff, anchor and managing editor, PBS Newshour.

In the fight against global health threats, DoD is working with national and international partners to ensure service members are protected against risk of infectious diseases, viruses, and illnesses.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

Smith tells Global Health Diplomacy students cooperation needed between nations, government

Article
7/14/2017
Dr. David Smith, performing the duties of the assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, speaks during a panel session at the U.S. State Department’s Global Health Diplomacy course at the agency’s Foreign Service Institute in Arlington, Virginia, July 12, 2017.

Dr. David Smith, performing the duties of the assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, spoke during a panel session at the U.S. State Department’s Global Health Diplomacy course at the agency’s Foreign Service Institute in Arlington, Virginia, July 12, 2017, He told attendees that cooperation across U.S. government agencies’ lines is crucial ...

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

DoD Instruction 2000.30: Global Health Engagement Activities

Policy

This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures for the conduct of global health engagement activities with partner nation (PN) entities.

Malaria U.S. Armed Forces 2016

Infographic
4/17/2017
Malaria is an important health threat to U.S. service members located in endemic areas for: •	Long-term duty assignments •	Participation in short-term contingency operations •	Personal travel In 2016, 57 service members were diagnosed with or reported to have malaria from 25 different medical facilities in the U.S., Afghanistan, Germany, Korea, Djibouti, and Oman. In 2011, 124 service members were affected. Malaria Pie chart P. falciparum (45.6%; n=26) Plasmodium vivax (26.3%; n=15) highest since 2012 P. malariae and P. ovale (3.5%; n=2) Unspecified agents (24.6%; n=14) The relatively low numbers of cases during 2012-2016 mainly reflect a decrease in cases acquired in Afghanistan – a reduction due largely to the withdrawal of U.S. forces from that country. Providers of medical care to military members should be knowledgeable of, and vigilant for, clinical manifestations of malaria outside of endemic areas. To learn more about how malaria impacts U.S. Armed Forces visit Health.mil/AFHSB.

In 2016, 57 service members were diagnosed with or reported to have malaria from 25 different medical facilities in the U.S., Afghanistan, Germany, Korea, Djibouti, and Oman.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Malaria

DoD News In Focus – Combating Malaria

Video
3/21/2017
DoD News In Focus – Combating Malaria

Inside the Washington, D.C., beltway, scientists and researchers at the Naval Medical Research Center work diligently to combat malaria for the American war fighter and the global population.

Recommended Content:

Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Malaria

Continuing Promise 17 completes humanitarian mission in Honduras

Article
3/15/2017
Army Sgt. Katia Rivera, assigned to Public Health Activity-Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Nathan Rock, attached to Naval Station Everett, Washington, inspect a dog for fleas during a veterinary checkup in support of Continuing Promise 2017’s visit to Trujillo, Honduras. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Shamira Purifoy)

Continuing Promise is a U.S. Southern Command-sponsored and U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet-conducted biennial deployment to countries in Central and South America

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Military medicine promotes global health security with partner nations in West Africa

Article
3/9/2017
Dr. David J. Smith, performing the duties of the assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, right, and Dr. Chris Daniel, senior advisor for global health engagement, (second from right), discuss laboratory capabilities with Nigerian medical officials. (Courtesy photo)

Working with partner nations to develop medical capabilities and experience is a critical part of our military medical mission

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Security Agenda | Pandemic Diseases

Malaria vaccine candidate proves effective in Navy Medicine clinical trial

Article
2/3/2017
Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Bowes, Camp Lemonnier's expeditionary medical facility senior preventive-medicine technician, places mosquitoes on a dish to view under a microscope at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti. Bowes, a member of the camp's mosquito-control program, routinely analyzes mosquitoes to help determine the risk of mosquito-borne diseases like malaria. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Tom Ouellette)

An effective malaria vaccine would be an ideal tool to prevent malaria in deployed military personnel

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Malaria

One Health concept highlights collaboration as key

Article
1/24/2017
Given its nature and the potential for pandemics, flu is of particular concern regarding Force Health Protection and global health. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Esteven Baca, from the immunizations department at Naval Hospital Pensacola, administers a flu shot to Lt. Alison Malloy, Staff Judge Advocate for the Center for Information Warfare Training. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Taylor L. Jackson)

Experts, including those at the Defense Health Agency’s Public Health Division, are integrating human medicine, animal health and environmental science to prevent and treat the flu, as well as other serious public health threats

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Veterinary Service | Public Health

Exercise Immediate Response 16

Video
1/13/2017
Exercise Immediate Response 16

Soldiers and Airmen practice combat trauma care with allied and partner nation medical service members at Cerklje ob Krki, Slovenia, as part of exercise Immediate Response.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement

U.S. military medicine finds way to help developing countries help themselves

Article
12/29/2016
U.S. Army Capt. Cody Negrete, a general dentist assigned to the Functional Specialty Team Bravo 407th Civil Affairs Company, along with Hope Africa University students, observe Burundi National Defense Force Col. Bizimana Athanase, oral surgeon, perform a routine filling on a man at Kamenge Military Hospital in Bujumbura, Burundi. Negrete traveled to Burundi to participate in a military health engagement meant to share best practices with the BNDF and their medical providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jocelyn A. Ford)

In terms of global health engagement, the Military Health System wants to teach developing countries’ military medical systems how to help themselves.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

DoD highlights leadership, commitment, impact on World AIDS Day

Article
12/5/2016
World Aids Day graphic

The Military Health System has been at the forefront of research innovation through the U.S. Military HIV Research Program

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

The intersection of health and security: The value of Global Health Engagement

Article
12/5/2016
Air Force Col. Rudolph Cachuela, Command Surgeon, U.S. Southern Command

The U.S. government has reaffirmed that global health is a critical priority in achieving a peaceful, prosperous and secure society

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Global Health Security Agenda
<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 5

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.