Back to Top Skip to main content

Trauma chief praises medical response to Sutherland Springs shooting

As a Level I trauma center, Brooke Army Medical Center at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, received patients from the Nov. 5, 2017, mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (U.S. Army file photo) As a Level I trauma center, Brooke Army Medical Center at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, received patients from the Nov. 5, 2017, mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (U.S. Army file photo)

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Military Hospitals and Clinics | San Antonio

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas  — The community teamwork and medical response here the afternoon of the Sutherland Springs shooting was "extremely heartwarming," the trauma chief at Brooke Army Medical Center said.

"When people heard about the shooting, we didn't have to do a recall. People came in immediately and pitched in, … not to watch, but to help," said Army Col. (Dr.) Kurt Edwards, who received patients and directed care that night.

"We ended up with more medical staff in the operating rooms, emergency department and [intensive care units] than we needed," he said.

As a Level I trauma center, Brooke Army Medical Center at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, treated eight victims from the Nov. 5, 2017, mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (U.S. Army file photo)As a Level I trauma center, Brooke Army Medical Center at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, treated eight victims from the Nov. 5, 2017, mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (U.S. Army file photo)

BAMC received eight victims – six adults and two minors – from the Nov. 5 mass shooting in the small community church in Sutherland Springs, about 30 miles east of San Antonio. One adult patient was discharged last week, and seven remain in BAMC's care.

The Initial Call

Air Force Maj. Belinda Kelley, the shift leader that night in the ER, received the initial call. "We were told we were possibly getting quite a few patients after a shooting at a church," Kelley recalled. "We weren't sure how many were coming here, but were told there were potentially 30 shot." Kelley later learned that 26 people had been killed and 20 injured that Sunday afternoon.

The situation was well controlled at BAMC, Edwards noted. "We had about a 30-minute warning. We started prepping for any eventuality to ensure adequate coverage. We opened up 15 trauma bays in preparation."

BAMC received four patients at first, then an additional four not long after.  "It was disheartening to see that the injuries were not dissimilar to those in combat," said Edwards, who has deployed multiple times to Iraq and Afghanistan. "To see people who had been sitting in a church having similar injuries to those in a combat zone [is] not something you want to see."

The seven patients' conditions currently range from good to critical. "They are all getting better," Edwards noted.

Team Effort

Edwards praised the first responders and the trauma partnership within the city that led to an effective response. BAMC and University Health System are the only Level I trauma centers in the San Antonio region, caring for civilian trauma patients over a 23,000-square-mile radius. On average, BAMC cares for 3,000 trauma patients each year.

"Both BAMC and University provide the highest level of trauma care together, and we do it every day," he noted. "It's an amazing partnership, especially when we are working together to care for people after a devastating tragedy."

"The staff response has been professional, efficient and caring," said Army Col. Michael Ludwig, deputy commander for inpatient services. "I could not be more proud of the staff – everyone from housekeeping to the technicians to our senior leaders."

Kelley said she's proud to work at the military's only Level I trauma center.

"As a nurse, it's a very emotional place," she said, "especially when I pick up the phone and someone is looking for a loved one. If I walk out of here and can't cry, then I can't come back, because that means I don't care any more.  Caring is what I do."

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Air Force medic saves heart attack victim

Article
1/3/2018
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Cassidy McCurdy, 51st Medical Group independent medical duty technician, poses for a photo at Osan Air Base, South Korea. McCurdy has more than five years of experience in the medical field including two years as an IDMT. On a flight from San Francisco to Seattle she responded to a passenger, who went into cardiac arrest, by providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and stabilizing the passenger. Once the aircraft landed, emergency responders from the ground transported the patient to the emergency room. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Franklin R. Ramos)

It took around two minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for the victim to regain consciousness

Recommended Content:

Civil Support

Joint Base Lewis-McChord Soldiers rescue train accident victims

Article
12/21/2017
Army Lt. Col. Christopher Sloan, Army Maj. Michael Livingston, and Army 2nd Lt. Robert McCoy helped rescue passengers at a train accident near DuPont, Washington, on Dec. 18. Sloan and Livingston work at Madigan Army Medical Center, while McCoy is assigned to the 62nd Medical Brigade at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. (U.S. Army photo by John Wayne Liston)

None of the Soldiers on scene questioned their impulse to run toward the accident and help the injured passengers

Recommended Content:

Emergency Preparedness and Response | Civil Support

Elective surgeries hone surgical skills, prepare medical team for combat

Article
12/7/2017
Inside Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s second floor surgery suite, surgeons and medical teams are busy honing their critical-care skills. Regardless of procedure or patient, every incision is an exercise in mission readiness. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

Regardless of procedure or patient, every incision is an exercise in mission readiness

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Health Readiness

WBAMC pharmacist catches serious drug interaction

Article
11/27/2017
Dr. Anna Jewula, pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, is recognized for her attentiveness in assisting a patient with a prescription order that contraindicated a previous prescription medication, avoiding a potentially serious drug interaction detrimental to the patient’s health (U.S. Army photo Marcy Sanchez)

Thanks to a pharmacist’s careful eye, one patient avoided a potentially deadly drug interaction

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | TRICARE Pharmacy Program

A Family's Smile

Video
9/27/2017
A Family's Smile

Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Kerry Latham restored quality of life to Killian McKinney, a baby with a cleft lip and palate, during a plastic surgery procedure at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda Md., Aug. 28, 2017. By treating McKinney, Latham supported the McKinney military family and enabled them to focus on the mission.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Secretary Shulkin tours Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin talks with Providers about Prosthetics

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Secretary Shulkin meets service dogs Walter Reed

Photo
4/28/2017
David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

David J. Shulkin, Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, visits Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland, April 27. Shulkin, who visited the medical center for the first time, spoke with various providers throughout the facilities to learn about the medical care given at the hospital.

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

Why do you want to be a military doctor?

Video
3/30/2017
Why do you want to be a military doctor?

During the 2017 Military Health System Female Physician Leadership Conference, we asked some military medical students and junior officers to share why they want to be a military medical doctor.

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Walter Reed Bethesda terrain park

Photo
11/1/2016
The new terrain park outside of the Military Advanced Training Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center provides another means for Walter Reed Bethesda physical therapists to simulate uneven terrain for their amputee patients without having to go to specific destinations to do so. (DoD photo by Mark Oswell)

The new terrain park outside of the Military Advanced Training Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center provides another means for Walter Reed Bethesda physical therapists to simulate uneven terrain for their amputee patients without having to go to specific destinations to do so. (DoD photo by Mark Oswell)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

FBCH Emergency Room

Photo
11/1/2016
Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Emergency Room (U.S. Army photo by Reese Brown)

Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Emergency Room (U.S. Army photo by Reese Brown)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Brooke Army Medical Center Transparency

Video
7/28/2016
Brooke Army Medical Center Transparency

This video highlights Brooke Army Medical Center's transparency initiatives and what they are doing to publish information about Patient Safety, Health Outcomes, Quality of Care and Patient Satisfaction.

Recommended Content:

MHS Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Information (for Patients) | Military Hospitals and Clinics

DoD Instruction 6010.22: National Disaster Medical System (NDMS)

Policy

This instruction establishes policy for DoD participation in the NDMS, a joint federal, State, and local mutual aid response system, to provide a coordinated medical response, patient movement, and definitive patient care during a military health emergency, U.S. national emergency, or U.S. domestic disaster.

Military Health System Prescription Transfer Procedures

Policy

Effective immediately, all Department of Defense (DoD) military treatment facility (MTF) outpatient pharmacies will accept patient requests for prescription transfers from another MTF and from retail pharmacies. When another pharmacy requests prescription transfer information on behalf of a patient, DoD MTF outpatient pharmacies will respond to the inquirer in a timely manner.

<< < ... 6 7 8 > >> 
Showing results 91 - 105 Page 7 of 8

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.