Back to Top Skip to main content

Leaders discuss global health collaboration as powerful tool

At an AMSUS session, Dr. Terry Rauch describes how global health activities help facilitate readiness, security and international collaboration. (Courtesy photo)  At an AMSUS session, Dr. Terry Rauch describes how global health activities help facilitate readiness, security and international collaboration. (Courtesy photo)

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Force Health Protection | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – Health stability in the world protects our own health and homeland. That’s the message AMSUS attendees heard in a session about Department of Defense policy and approach on what is collectively called Global Health Engagement, or GHE.

The session discussion emphasized how knowledge can be a powerful and lasting tool when a community, region or nation finds itself working to prevent the spread of a deadly virus; responding to a humanitarian crisis; or building military medical skills and capabilities.   

"We live in an interesting world with a broad scope of threats to global security and stability,” said Dr. Terry Rauch, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for health readiness policy and oversight.

Members of the DoD Global Health Engagement Council weighed in on advancing the United States military’s connection to partner countries on health matters during a session at the annual meeting of  AMSUS (The Society for Federal Health Professionals). The session titled “Strategic perspectives: Health Affairs and Policy discussing the new DoDI and strategic thinking on GHE" included a three-member panel: Rauch; Mr. Mark Swayne, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for stability and humanitarian affairs; and, Navy Rear Adm. Colin Chinn, joint staff surgeon.

According to the session speakers, sharing best military medical practices with other nations is “a win-win.” Session attendees heard how GHE advances readiness, enhances interoperability, builds security, and helps strengthen cooperation with governments.

Standing up blood safety programs, teaching patient movement techniques, and sharing advances in trauma care with another country’s military are only a few examples of GHE in action. Panelists discussed instances where military health exchanges brought dozens of countries to the same table. While sharing information, nations develop confidence in each other. Over time, the activities create friendly ties. And, when militaries need to collaborate, the U.S. military is medically ready and able to partner with others to maintain regional stability and security.

GHE’s impact is difficult to measure, but countries that handle disease well are noticeably more secure overall. The U.S. military reaches out across the globe to help in more than a few ways. Natural disasters, climate issues, crowded cities, and territorial disputes appear all over the world. It’s no small task for any country to handle humanitarian aid and disaster recovery, reduce drug and human trafficking; or care for fleeing migrants across borders. Relationships with other nations can help all parties in these difficult situations.

Rauch explained that GHE activities enable the Combatant Commands to execute Theater Campaign Plans.  

“The DoD’s GHE activities help facilitate readiness,” said Rauch. “Engaging with our partners’ capabilities brings international partner collaboration.”  

The speakers discussed how helping partner nations builds medical capacity and skills that can reduce issues, enhance cooperation, improve how to diagnose health threats and offer better care for military, individual and population health. Plus, the remaining education from a military health exchange can sustain partner countries and their neighbors long after the US military moves on.  

Swanye identified how DoD has come a long way in coordinating and improving its approach to GHE. The Global Health Engagement Council was created to organize efforts involved with quick DoD responses, and it brings senior leaders together to focus on health security.

“The whole reason we created the GHE Council was from the lessons learned when Ebola spread across Western Africa in 2014. The Council is another step in the right direction that highlights the importance of GHE,” Swanye said.

As recently as July 12, 2017, a new DoD Instruction (DoDI 2000.30) came out that specifically defines roles and responsibilities. With this policy in place, the panelists stated there is now a way forward to achieving stronger coordination across DoD and among agencies, academic institutions, civilian health care organizations, and partner nations.

"How can we best position the United States with global peace and security? We must build relationships with partners – and, GHE helps get us closer to reaching that goal," said Chinn.

You also may be interested in...

Navy entomologists team up to build disease detection capacity in Honduras

Article
10/18/2018
Navy LCDR Kimberly Edgel (right) and Carmen Lucas examine a positive malaria blood smear at U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit, or NAMRU, 6 in Callao, Peru. (U.S. Navy photo)

Leishmaniasis, malaria, dengue and Chagas disease are known to be present in Honduras

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Bringing Comfort 2018

Video
10/17/2018
The USNS Comfort is a state-of-the-art hospital ship, and it’s scheduled to deploy to Central and South America for Continuing Promise 2018.

The USNS Comfort is a state-of-the-art hospital ship, and it’s scheduled to deploy to Central and South America for Continuing Promise 2018.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Sailors, Afghan medical professionals team up to improve medical care

Article
10/10/2018
Navy Lt. Cdr. Travis J. Fitzpatrick, senior nurse for Kandahar Airfield NATO Role III Multinational Medical Unit, demonstrates a technique on how to clear the airway of a patient to Afghan medical staff members during a medical advisory visit at Kandahar Regional Military Hospital, Camp Hero in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Staff members from the Role III conduct routine visits to KRMH to train and advise Afghan medical staff. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Neysa Canfield)

The Kandahar Regional Military Hospital is run by Afghan military and civilian medical professionals

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability | Partners | Global Health Security Agenda

USNS Comfort to deploy to Central and South America

Article
10/9/2018
The U.S. Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort is scheduled to depart Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, en route to South America and Central America where it will conduct an 11-week medical assistance mission working closely with host-nation health and government partners in Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, and Honduras. This mission marks the sixth time the hospital ship will provide medical assistance in the region and reflects the United States’ enduring promise of friendship, partnership, and solidarity with the Americas. (U.S. Navy file photo)

The ship’s crew will include more than 200 U.S. and partner nation military doctors, nurses and technicians

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Partners | Global Health Security Agenda

Navy Medicine global health team conducts trauma exchange in Vietnam

Article
8/28/2018
The 13 Navy Medicine members stand together on the first day of the Integrated Trauma and Medical Readiness Exchange engagement in Vietnam. (U.S. Navy photo by Capt. Joel Roos)

Sharing trauma management skills was the focus of this exchange

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

U.S. doctors save Italian patient hours from death

Article
8/8/2018
U.S. Air Force Capt. Melanie Gates, left, Capt. Nick McKenzie, and Capt. Richard Thorsted, all who are Special Operations Command Forward Northwest Africa ground surgical team members, gather for a photo at Nigerien Air Base 101, Niamey. The three doctors recently finished medical school and are serving their first deployment. They are deployed from Travis Air Force Base, California. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

The patient had a fever, a very high heart rate and low oxygen levels

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement | Partners

USNS Mercy returns home following Pacific Partnership 2018

Article
7/24/2018
Navy Hospital Corpsman Tianna Garcia, assigned to Naval Medical Center San Diego, is greeted by her husband Aaron Garcia during the homecoming ceremony for the hospital ship USNS Mercy. The ship and her crew completed a five-month humanitarian relief mission to Southeast Asia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Indra Beaufort)

Pacific Partnership 2018 included more than 800 military and civilian personnel from the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and the United Kingdom

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

U.S. Navy, JMSDF participate in bilateral training exercise

Article
6/21/2018
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Sailors and U.S. Naval Hospital (USNH) Yokosuka personnel transport a simulated patient during a mass casualty drill in conjunction with hospital ship USNS Mercy and JMSDF personnel. The drill was conducted in order to prepare medical staff for a mass casualty scenario involving a maritime incident at sea. USNH Yokosuka is the largest U.S. military treatment facility on mainland Japan caring for approximately 43,000 eligible beneficiaries. (U.S. Navy photo by Tim Jensen)

The simulated disaster for the training exercise included a Japanese vessel colliding with a U.S. vessel

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

Military doctors conduct infectious diseases training in Panama

Article
6/13/2018
Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama. Gonzalez and U.S. military doctors were participating in infectious diseases training, in which they received informational lectures from Panamanian infectious disease experts and field studies of possible virus-carrying wildlife and insects. The event took place during Exercise New Horizons 2018, which is a joint training exercise where U.S. military members conduct training in civil engineer, medical and support services while benefiting the local community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

Due to the geographic location of Panama, the importance the country places on controlling diseases greatly benefits the Unites States

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Project Sea Raven delivers cutting-edge pathogen detection technology

Article
5/31/2018
U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Bowes, senior preventive-medicine technician, places mosquitoes on a dish to view under a microscope. Project Sea Raven’s capabilities are not limited to just insects – it can test anything from blood to soil and water. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Tom Ouellette)

Project Sea Raven is now an integral part of USNS Mercy’s microbiology capacity

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Air Force medical team supports exercise in Panama

Article
5/29/2018
Air Force Master Sgt. Emeriles Curry, 346th Expeditionary Medical Operations Squadron dental hygienist, provides dental care to a local man in the Coclé Province of Panama. To date, in 2-weeks’ worth of Medical Readiness Training Exercises, the teams working in conjunction with the Panamanian Ministry of Health, have seen nearly 4,700 patients. The medical team is participating in Exercise New Horizons 2018, which is a joint training exercise focused on medical, civil engineer and support service personnel’s ability to prepare, deploy, operate, and redeploy outside the United States. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

The medical team has been working closely with Panamanian dentists

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

USNS Mercy arrives in Vietnam for Pacific Partnership

Article
5/23/2018
The hospital ship USNS Mercy anchors in shallow water during a Pacific Partnership stop. (PP18). PP18’s mission is to work collectively with host and partner nations to enhance regional interoperability and disaster response capabilities, increase stability and security in the region, and foster new and enduring friendships across the Indo-Pacific Region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cameron Pinske)

Pacific Partnership is the largest annual multilateral HA/DR preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Airmen contribute to saving a life during New Horizons 2018

Article
5/17/2018
From left to right: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ariel Thomas, 346th Air Expeditionary Group medical technician, Master Sgt. Reina Blake, 346 AEG Office of the Legal Advisor superintendent, and Special Agent Alexandra Garced, Air Force Office of Special Investigations agent, stand for a group photo in Meteti, Panama. Blake, Thomas and Garced are credited with saving the life of a local Panamanian woman after she jumped from a bridge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

Airmen go above and beyond to save a local woman

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

New Horizons embedded health engagement provides unparalleled training

Article
5/15/2018
Air Force Capt. (Dr.) Charles Hutchings, 346th Expeditionary Medical Operations Squadron pediatrician, explains information to a local woman near Meteti, Panama, April 17, 2018. Hutchings was part of an embedded health engagement team participating in Exercise New Horizons 2018, which will assist communities throughout Panama by providing medical assistance and building facilities such as schools, a youth community center and a women’s health ward. (Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

For medical professionals participating in Exercise New Horizons 2018, hands-on training comes in the form of fully submerging into local clinics

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Multinational surgeons participate in first robot-assisted surgery onboard USNS Mercy

Article
5/7/2018
Surgical staff assigned to Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Mercy for Pacific Partnership 2018 and the Sri Lankan surgical team from Base Hospital Mutur connect the probes of the Da Vinci XI Robot Surgical System to a patient during the first robot-assisted surgery while aboard the Mercy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey L. Adams)

A joint team of multinational surgeons successfully completed a gall bladder removal, using a Da Vinci XI Robot Surgical System

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 5

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing.. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.