Back to Top Skip to main content

Air Force robotic surgery training program aims at improving patient outcomes

Air Force Col. Debra Lovette (left), 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from Air Force 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Mississippi. The training program stood up in March 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue). Air Force Col. Debra Lovette (left), 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from Air Force 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Mississippi. The training program stood up in March 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue).

Recommended Content:

Technology | Innovation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — As the use of surgical robotics increases, the Air Force Medical Service is training its surgical teams in the latest technology, ensuring patients have access to the most advanced surgical procedures and best possible outcomes.

To address the demand for training military healthcare providers, Air Force Maj. Joshua Tyler, director of robotics at Keesler Air Force Base, helped to establish the Institute for Defense Robotic Surgical Education (InDoRSE). The first of its kind in the Air Force, the facility trains Air Force, Army, Navy, and Department of Veterans Affairs surgical teams to use state-of-the-art medical robotics. Access to this type of training was previously only available through private industry.

“Robotic surgery is becoming the standard of care for many specialties and procedures, but Air Force surgeons had limited opportunities to train with surgical robots,” said Tyler. “We needed a way to get surgeons trained without relying solely on the private sector. With the creation of InDoRSE we are able to do just that by using existing facilities and personnel.”

The InDoRSE training site addresses challenges unique to military healthcare. The training also uses a team-based model, which helps overcome some of the challenges of implementing of robotic surgery in military hospitals

“Between deployments, operational tempo, and varying surgical volumes at military facilities, it is important that whole teams are fully trained on surgical robotics,” explained Tyler.  “Also training the nurses and medical technicians, in addition to the surgeon, ensures that everyone has tangible experience with the robot, and helps get surgical robotics up and running much quicker.”

Robotic surgeries have been shown to deliver better outcomes for patients than traditional surgery. Robotics offers increased mobility for the surgeon, allowing them to make smaller incisions, and gives them better visualization. This precision leads to more successful surgeries and quicker recovery times, which improves patient satisfaction and lowers costs.

“The best outcomes I’ve ever given my patients came using robotics”, explained Tyler. “We see significant decreases in post-surgery pain, surgical site infection rates, and length of hospital stay. That quicker recovery means patients get to return to their normal life more quickly.”

The InDoRSE facility at Keesler stood up in March 2017. There are already plans to double its training capacity soon. Soon after Keesler’s facility opened, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base set up their own surgical robotics program. Travis Air Force Base in California and Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada are currently working on their surgical robotics acquisition now.

“Use of robotics is increasing in many medical specialties,” said Tyler. “Providing opportunities for our whole surgical teams to receive training on this cutting edge technology is a vital to the AFMSs focus on continuously improving the patient experience.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Belvoir Hospital offers cutting-edge liver cancer treatment

Article
4/25/2017
For patients battling cancer, quality of life is most often achieved through treatment options. At Belvoir Hospital, a new localized option – the first of its kind for any military hospital on the East Coast – is giving patients with liver tumors another choice to enhance their quality of life. (Department of Defense photo by Reese Brown)

Belvoir Hospital is giving patients with liver tumors another choice to enhance their quality of life

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Technology

MHS GENESIS Brand Style Guide, Version 12.0

Publication
4/21/2017

The purpose of this style guide is to establish the MHS GENESIS brand guidelines and educate its users to observe the brand standards. Branding is a key supporting element for communication, training and deployment activities.

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | Technology | MHS GENESIS Branding

Keesler Medical Center surgeons implant Air Force's first Micra Pacemaker

Article
4/21/2017
Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Pacemakers are the most common way to treat bradycardia and restore the heart's normal rhythm by sending electrical impulses to increase heart rate

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

David Grant Medical Center first Air Force hospital to receive advanced birthing simulator

Article
4/20/2017
Medical staff conduct training on the new Complicated OB Emergency Simulator at Travis Air Force Base, California.  Travis has been selected by the Defense Health Agency as one of five installations within DoD to be a pilot base for the new system. The system will provide a standardized platform for training for all levels of clinical staff to promote standardization on patient safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Louis Briscese)

The Defense Health Agency purchased five of the simulators for the Department of Defense and chose Travis as the pilot base for the Air Force to provide the training and necessary feedback

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Children's Health | Women's Health | Technology

Nutrition centers improve health readiness

Article
4/19/2017
Patient care is at the core of multi-service market nutrition centers. These centers provide a range of services to meet individual patient needs within the military health community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Nathan Byrnes.)

Nutrition centers at MTFs, especially in large multi-service markets like National Capital Region, benefit patients by providing a variety of services; dietitians at these centers contribute to health readiness in many ways, such as teaching classes, providing training, and carefully preparing patient meals

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Multi-Service Markets | Nutrition | Health Readiness

Army modernizes portable battlefield radiography system

Article
4/14/2017
U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency Equipment Specialist Diego Gomez-Morales demonstrates the new Portable Digital Radiography System that will replace two aging devices, including an X-ray generator and an accompanying computerized reader system. The PDRS combines these capabilities into a single lightweight X-ray unit intended for use by deployed medical, Special Operations and Mortuary Affair Army units. (U.S. Army photo by Ellen Crown)

The U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency will soon field the PDRS to the Army to replace two aging devices, including an X-ray generator and an accompanying computerized reader system

Recommended Content:

Technology

Belvoir Hospital first in DoD to perform new vision correction procedure

Article
4/13/2017
The Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center at the Belvoir Hospital performs the first small incision lenticule extraction procedure in the DoD, the latest advancement in laser eye surgery. The procedure uses a very fast, short-pulsed laser to perform the vision correction procedure and as a result, visual recovery time is accelerated. (Department of Defense photo by Reese Brown)

Fort Belvoir Community Hospital’s surgeons performed the first small incision lenticule extraction procedure in the Department of Defense

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Vision Loss

Blue-light-blocking lenses a potential breakthrough for warfighters

Article
4/7/2017
Airmen at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, are illuminated by the glow of the blue light from their computer screens. Blue light blocks the brain's production of melatonin, an important chemical that helps people sleep. New lenses developed by the Navy are designed to be worn for a couple of hours before bedtime and will block the blue light, allowing warfighters to get better sleep. (U.S. Air Force photo by Greg L. Davis)

New tinting for glasses could help service members get more sleep.

Recommended Content:

Sleep | Health Readiness | Warrior Care | Innovation

Chinn to Navy League: Innovations key to medically ready force, ready medical force

Article
4/7/2017
Navy Rear Adm. Colin Chinn, the acting deputy director of the Defense Health Agency, talked about battlefield medicine innovations as Rear Adm. Stephen Pachuta, Medical Officer of the Marine Corps watched, during a combat survivability panel at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space exposition, April 5, 2017, at National Harbor just outside of Washington, D.C. Others on the panel (not pictured)included Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. Forrest Faison; Rear Adm. Cathal O’Connor, commander, Expeditionary Strike Group THREE; and Rear Adm. Tina Davidson, director Medical Resources, Plans, and Policy at the Navy’s Bureau of Medicine.

Innovations in battlefield medicine are helping raise survival rates for those injured in combat to the highest levels in the history of warfare. Navy Rear Adm. Colin Chinn, the acting deputy director of the Defense Health Agency, spoke about that at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space exposition, April 5, 2017, at National Harbor just outside of ...

Recommended Content:

Innovation | Health Readiness

WBAMC provides newborn blanket to minimize SIDS

Article
4/6/2017
Karson Winters, son of Army Spc. Samiya Winters and Spc. Deshau Winters, naps while wrapped with a safe sleep blanket, a toe-to-neck zip-up blanket designed to help newborns stay warm while reducing the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, at William Beaumont Army Medical Center. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

According to the American Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Institute, there are about 4,000 sleep-related infant deaths occurring each year in the United States

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Keesler surgeons perform first robotic surgery in Air Force

Article
4/6/2017
Members of the 81st Surgical Operations Squadron perform the first robotic surgery in the Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. Using robotic surgery decreases risk of surgical sight infections while giving the surgeon better visibility and dexterity while operating, which improves the overall surgical procedure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jenay Randolph)

Surgeons used the da Vinci Xi robot to perform a robotic ventral hernia repair

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

Why do you want to be a military doctor?

Video
3/30/2017
Why do you want to be a military doctor?

During the 2017 Military Health System Female Physician Leadership Conference, we asked some military medical students and junior officers to share why they want to be a military medical doctor.

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Gateway momentum impresses Defense Health Agency director

Article
3/14/2017
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, Director of the Defense Health Agency, describes how the Gateway Performance System could be used across the Military Health System at the 59th Medical Wing Gateway Academy in Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. The DHA supports the delivery of integrated, affordable, and high quality health services to Military Health System beneficiaries and is responsible for driving greater integration of clinical and business processes across the MHS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)

Vice Adm. Bono heard from several Gateway students about the impact the course is having at all levels around the wing as providers and staff look to improve patient care

Recommended Content:

Innovation

Walter Reed makes new leadless pacemaker available to military patients

Article
3/13/2017
Surgeons at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center implant the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo)

Doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center are implementing the leadless pacemaker

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Innovation | Technology | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

TOL Patient Portal Secure Messaging

Fact Sheet
3/9/2017

TRICARE Online Patient Portal (TOLPP) Secure Messaging (SM) provides Military Health System patients who receive care at a military treatment facility or clinic access to a robust messaging capability, allowing authorized patients the ability to securely communicate with their health care team.

Recommended Content:

Technology
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 13

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.