Back to Top Skip to main content

RESET improves pediatric care

Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd Medical Group pediatrician, performs a wellness vision exam during a patient’s check-up at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The pediatric team has implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. The integration of RESET in the Military Health System Genesis workflow has improved the clinic’s goals of patient access and care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Whitney Laine) Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd Medical Group pediatrician, performs a wellness vision exam during a patient’s check-up at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. The pediatric team has implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. The integration of RESET in the Military Health System Genesis workflow has improved the clinic’s goals of patient access and care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Whitney Laine)

Recommended Content:

Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics

FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE, Wash. — The 92nd Medical Group Pediatric Clinic implemented a new concept of operations: rewarding, efficiency, setting priorities and empowering team members, or RESET, to their system of patient care. 

RESET came from an original model built at Ramstein Air Base and was modified by Fairchild Airmen to better suit the pediatric clinic and successfully integrate with Military Health System (MHS) Genesis.

“The aim of RESET is to improve access to care for the patient population,” said Air Force Capt. Joseph Migliuri, 92nd MDG pediatrician. “This has allowed patients to see their provider more expeditiously. This is done by changing the way in which we do business, cutting waste in our workflow and rewarding teams that are effective in this area.”

Although the RESET system was not intended to be used with MHS Genesis or a pediatric clinic, the pediatric team restructured the original blueprint to fit the needs of the clinic. With the new design, the team focused on their main goal of increasing patient access.

“Records show us that in December 2017, we had a rate of zero available appointments within a week’s time; since integrating the RESET system, we saw our rates of availability increase to 55 appointments per week as of March 2018,” said Air Force Capt. Neal Alexander, 92nd MDG maternal child flight nurse manager.

Virtual appointments are offered to allow patients to receive the care they need from doctors without having to visit the clinic. Caring for patients through virtual appointments has also allowed doctors to have more time to see more patients per day.

“Patients would previously have to go through a long rope of people to have their information forwarded to a nurse or technician and then a doctor,” Alexander said. “We have changed the appointment process. Now, when a patient calls, they are offered a virtual consultation or a face-to-face consultation.”

The team has changed the culture of their work environment with the reward portion of the RESET program. This has motivated team members to become innovative, driven and efficient with patient care.

Within three months implementing RESET into the 92nd MDG Pediatric Clinic MHS Genesis workflow, the clinic’s goals of patient access and care have greatly improved. Through the spread of this innovation and modernization to other specialties and Department of Defense installations, Team Fairchild’s Airmen are keeping mobility forces operationally ready for any missions they’re called to do.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

No effort spared to bring home seriously wounded Soldier

Article
10/17/2019
Air Force Capt. Natasha Cardinal, 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron critical care nurse, monitors her patient during a flight from Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan to San Antonio, Texas. Critical care air transport teams are rapidly deployable teams consisting of a physician, critical care nurse and a respiratory therapist who provide a mobile intensive care unit for complex, critically wounded patients. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Mancuso)

The priority the military places on saving the lives of its service members is unparalleled

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

TRICARE website expands to include military hospital sites

Article
10/16/2019
The TRICARE website is growing. As of Oct. 1, TRICARE welcomed several military hospitals and clinics to its website.

By 2021, more than 350 individual military hospital and clinic websites will move to TRICARE.mil.

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Health Program | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Soldier self-amputates leg to aid battle buddies

Article
10/9/2019
Army Spc. Ezra Maes undergoes physical rehabilitation at the Center for the Intrepid, Brooke Army Medical Center's cutting-edge rehabilitation center on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Oct. 2, 2019. (U.S. Army photo by Corey Toye)

If I didn't help myself, my crew, no one was going to

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Warrior Care

Naval Hospital Pensacola transitions to DHA, stands up readiness training commands

Article
9/20/2019
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Joren Seibert uses cryotherapy for wart removal at Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville’s primary care. Seibert, a native of Galesburg, Illinois, says, “I started in the Navy as a deck seaman and can now proudly say I’m a hospital corpsman. The people we care for deserve nothing but the best. Being able to directly help those folks every day is what keeps me coming back and what motivates me to continue being a better corpsman." (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

To support the transition, Navy Medicine is establishing a co-located readiness and training command

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

A surprise delivery at Fort Bragg’s maternity fair

Article
9/19/2019
Pamela Riis (in pink the pink top) learns more about the use of nitrous oxide during labor at the semiannual Fort Bragg Maternity Fair. More than 300 pregnant women, soon-to-be dads, parents of infants, and those planning to have a baby soon participated in the event. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Beal)

For Linda Steadman, a certified nursing assistant, this will be a day to remember

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Women's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Officials discuss Blanchfield Hospital’s future as transition nears

Article
8/15/2019
Army Maj. Gen. Ron Place, who was recently confirmed for promotion to lieutenant general and selected to serve as the next director of DHA, visited Blanchfield Army Community Hospital and Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Aug. 7 for more discussion about the hospital’s transition to DHA Oct. 1. (U.S. Army photo)

Supporting forces remains the number one priority of the Defense Health Agency

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Maxwell AFB’s medical group reorganizes, improves health care

Article
8/9/2019
Air Force Medical Service seal

The Air Force Medical Service is transforming 43 military treatment facilities

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Sesame Street celebrates 50th anniversary at Madigan

Article
8/5/2019
Army Col. (Dr.) Matthew Studer, the chief of Madigan's Department of Pediatrics, talks with Nina and Abby Cadabby from Sesame Street during a special visit at Madigan Army Medical Center on July 26. (U.S. Army photo by Ryan Graham)

As a part of their 50th anniversary tour across America, Sesame Street made a special stop at Madigan

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Soldier helps save life of man struck by lightning

Article
7/25/2019
Army Capt. Robert Blume, physician assistant, has been called a "guardian angel" for his heroic actions, June 6, 2019, after saving the life of a man struck by lightning. Blume, along with San Antonio-area first responders, worked together to help 21-year-old Joshua Favor, after he was electrocuted while delivering roofing materials during a break in a thunderstorm. (U.S. Army photo Jose E. Rodriguez)

Blume went home that evening unaware of Favor's condition

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Madigan pharmacy wait time drops

Article
7/25/2019
Pharmacist Ashley Burrill fills a prescription at the Madigan pharmacy on July 23. Assigning staff to their strongest roles helped to reduce the pharmacy wait time. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)

The average pharmacy wait time was between 90 and 120 minutes; now, the average is 20 to 25 minutes

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | MHS GENESIS | Military Hospitals and Clinics

MHS GENESIS discussed at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson

Article
7/16/2019
Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michelle Rootes (center), 673d Medical Group superintendent, and U.S. Air Force Col. Mark Lamey (right), 673d MDG deputy commander, welcome U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019. Payne visited JBER to discuss upcoming changes to MHS and what that means for patients and providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jonathan Valdes Montijo)

Payne highlighted the new electronic health record

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Puget Sound MHS plans for a joint medical environment

Article
7/15/2019
Puget Sound logo

Puget Sound MHS will transition to Defense Health Agency management beginning on Oct. 1

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Vice President Pence tours USNS Comfort before its Latin America deployment

Article
6/20/2019
Vice President Mike Pence (right) greets Navy Lt. Gwendolyn Mann, and his wife, Karen Pence (center right), greets Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Edna Wallace during a tour of the USNS Comfort in Miami, June 18, 2019. (U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Jordan R. Bair)

The vice president called the deployment a lifesaving mission

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Global Health Engagement | Military Hospitals and Clinics

DHA director visits Tyndall

Article
6/11/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, Defense Health Agency director, speaks at a town hall June 5, 2019 at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. During her visit, she applauded the medical Airmen who have endured the challenges due to Hurricane Michael. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandra Sing

The goal for the DoD switching administration to DHA is a more integrated, efficient and effective system of readiness and health

Recommended Content:

MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Hospital honored for Hepatitis B vaccine birth dose rate

Article
6/10/2019
Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Tommy Baker checks on Navy Logistics Specialist Seaman Tabernesha Victrum and Romeo Taylor as they hold their newborn daughter at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s Maternal Infant Unit. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

NH Jacksonville is the newest entry into IAC’s Birth Dose Honor Roll

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Immunization Healthcare
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 9

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.