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New simulator preps WBAMC staff for OB emergencies

Regina Vadney, nurse midwife, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, evaluates a medical manikin using WBAMC's new simulation system which provides cutting-edge training to medical staff during a simulated postpartum hemorrhage scenario. The new simulation system aims to increase communication, and improve interdisciplinary and clinical performance of staff when treating obstetric emergencies. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez) Regina Vadney, nurse midwife, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, evaluates a medical manikin using WBAMC's new simulation system which provides cutting-edge training to medical staff during a simulated postpartum hemorrhage scenario. The new simulation system aims to increase communication, and improve interdisciplinary and clinical performance of staff when treating obstetric emergencies. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

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EL PASO, Texas — A new simulation system at William Beaumont Army Medical Center's Labor and Delivery Department aims to improve patient care and safety through advanced training simulations.

The state-of-the-art simulator provides WBAMC staff up to various cutting-edge training scenarios which are documented and transmitted to allow for instant feedback on the exercise, increase communication during emergencies, and improve interdisciplinary and clinical performance.

"We have been doing monthly simulation training for years. However, the [new simulation system] is a more advanced simulator that will provide feedback to the team regarding their performance" said Army Maj. Laquincyia Key, clinical nurse specialist, Maternal-Child Health Services, WBAMC.

The new simulator follows standardized guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists, which not only provides health care staff with instant feedback from the exercise according to their performance, but also collects and transmits the data to the Defense Health Agency to advance and standardize training platforms. According to Key, the new simulator also meets required DHS's biennial training mandates.

"The [previous simulation system] needed updating and wasn't able to collect training data and track clinical outcomes," said Key. "The [new simulation system] has pre-programmed scenarios with Internet curricula available.

Because most patients at WBAMC's labor and delivery are low risk, the simulator helps train and prepare staff for emergency cases. Scenarios such as postpartum hemorrhage, umbilical cord prolapse, shoulder dystocia, eclampsia, breech vaginal delivery and operative vaginal delivery are feasible with the simulator to provide staff opportunities to improve obstetric emergency skills.

"Communication and organizational culture are the root causes of most cases of perinatal death and injury," said Key. "Simulation-based training allows the team to practice high-risk, low-volume obstetric emergencies in preparation for when these events actually occur. They are able to identify areas of improvement and evaluate their team's performance with non-judgmental debriefing."

Scenarios also supports WBAMC Simulation Center's continuing mission to produce measureable outcomes from scenario-based training.

Added features include a medical manikin capable of birthing an infant manikin which allows staff to conduct neonatal resuscitation training. More than 100 newborns are delivered each month at WBAMC.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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