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Summer travel: Getting care while overseas

 Summer vacation is the start of travel season for many military families.
Summer vacation is the start of travel season for many military families. When traveling overseas, you should know what to do in the event of illness or other health issues.

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Summer vacation is the start of travel season for many military families. TRICARE covers you when you travel on business or take a vacation with family. When traveling overseas, you should know what to do in the event of illness or other health issues.

Before You Leave

You should get routine and specialty care before you leave for your trip. Otherwise, your care may not be authorized when you’re on your trip. When overseas, you can seek urgent and emergency care from any host nation provider. However, your rules for getting care depend on your plan and travel destination. Before you travel, follow these steps:

1. Get Prescriptions Filled or Refilled

  • Pack prescription medications in your carry-on luggage.
  • Find a network pharmacy where you’re traveling (just in case).

2. Pack a List of Phone Numbers

3. Update Your Information in Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS)

  • Log into milConnect.
  • Call 1-800-538-9552 (TTY/TDD: 1-866-363-2883).

While You’re Away

To get help or to find a provider when traveling, contact the appropriate TRICARE Overseas Program Regional Call Center. You may also call the Medical Assistance number for the area where you’re located for assistance.

  • In an emergency, go to the nearest emergency care facility, or call the Medical Assistance number for the area where you are. When overseas, remember these additional points:
  • You may need to pay upfront for services and file a claim to get money back.
  • Keep all receipts and file claims in the region where you live, not where you get the care.
  • If you’re admitted to a hospital, call your Overseas Regional Call Center before leaving the facility, preferably within 24 hours or on the next business day.
  • If you’re an active duty service member and admitted to a hospital, call your primary care manager or your Overseas Regional Call Center. You should do this before leaving the facility, preferably within 24 hours or on the next business day. This will help in the event that you need to coordinate authorization, continued care, and payment.
  • TRICARE covers air evacuations to the closest safe location that can provide the required care when medically necessary.
  • See specific rules for getting urgent care overseas based on your TRICARE plan.

Visit the TRICARE website and select your plan for more guidelines when traveling overseas.

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