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Women’s Health: Taking time for yourself

Navy Lt. Jessica Miller, a nurse at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s Obstetrics/Gynecology Clinic, discusses cervical cancer screenings with a patient. Starting at age 21, women should get a Pap test every three years. After turning 30, women have a choice. Get a Pap test every three years, or get a Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years. Women should talk with their doctor about options. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel) Navy Lt. Jessica Miller, a nurse at Naval Hospital Jacksonville’s Obstetrics/Gynecology Clinic, discusses cervical cancer screenings with a patient. Starting at age 21, women should get a Pap test every three years. After turning 30, women have a choice. Get a Pap test every three years, or get a Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years. Women should talk with their doctor about options. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

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Preventive Health | Women's Health

NAVAL HOSPITAL JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Preventive services are your best defense against preventable diseases.

The top two causes of death for women are heart disease and cancer, with diabetes ranking seventh, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Prevention is the best medicine,” said Navy Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, NH Jacksonville director for public health. “As women, we need to take time to get our health screenings and care for ourselves.”

  • Heart disease: Heart disease is the number one cause of death in U.S. women. Key risk factors include high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking. Other risk factors include diabetes, overweight and obesity, poor diet, physical inactivity, and excessive alcohol use. Know your blood pressure, talk to your primary care manager about diabetes testing, quit smoking, talk to your primary care manager about cholesterol and triglyceride tests, make healthy food choices, limit alcohol, and find healthy ways to cope with stress.
  • Cervical cancer: Prevent cervical cancer – with the right test at the right time. Starting at age 21, get a Pap test every three years. After turning 30, you have a choice: Get a Pap test every three years; or get a combined Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) test every five years. Talk with your PCM about options.
  • Breast cancer: Mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat and before it’s big enough to feel. Starting at age 40, talk with your PCM about when to start and how often to get a mammogram. You have the choice to get an annual mammogram at age 40 and older. It’s easy to schedule, with no need to see your PCM.
  • Colorectal cancer: Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in U.S. women. If you’re age 50 or older, get screened now for colorectal cancer. Screening can find growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer. Screening can also find cancer at an early stage, when treatment often leads to a cure. If you have risk factors, you might need to be tested earlier or more often. Talk to your PCM.
  • Diabetes: If you have diabetes, see your health care team every three to six months for an A1C test. This checks your long-term control of blood sugar. Make an appointment with your PCM today. You can discuss strategies to manage diabetes at home, work, school, and while traveling. You can also talk with our diabetes nurse or nutrition clinic.
  • Chlamydia: Most people who have chlamydia don’t know it, since there’s often no symptoms. It’s the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. Women younger than 25 (and older women with risk factors) need chlamydia testing every year.

Dealing with high stress, depression, difficulty sleeping, or other non-physical health concerns are just as important to stay healthy. Proper sleep, physical activity, and nutrition are key components of preventive health and day-to-day wellness.

Women need a mix of cardio and resistance or weight-bearing exercise at least three to five times a week to help prevent osteoporosis, heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Exercise also promotes good self-image, which is important to a woman's mental health.

Eating healthy is critical to women’s health. A balanced diet of lean proteins, healthy fats, smart carbs, and fiber are essential elements to a proper diet.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

 

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