Back to Top Skip to main content

One more for the road

Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide.

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

WASHINGTON — For some, donating blood is one of the last tasks ahead of relocation or retirement. Peter Williams, a repeat donor with the Pentagon Blood Donor Center, contributed one last whole blood donation with the center upon his retirement as a contractor with the Department of Defense.

Williams’ first encounter with blood donation was in 1970 during Navy recruit training at Great Lakes, Illinois. “It was our third day at boot camp… the company I was in was marched into a big auditorium on base and was ordered to line up to give blood.” he said, “We were told that the blood would be put on an aircraft that afternoon heading for immediate use in Vietnam.”

Williams served two tours in Vietnam as an ensign in 1973, and as a lieutenant in 1975 assigned to the amphibious landing ship-tank, the USS Frederick for the evacuation of Saigon; during this period there were no facilities for giving, storing, or transporting blood on these types of smaller ships. Knowing the importance of having a ready supply of blood for the troops, Williams became a regular blood donor.

Pictured (Left to right): Navy Hospital Corpsman Third Class Castro, Peter Williams and Hospital Corpsman Third Class Nielsen. Castro and Nielsen present Williams a donor appreciation certificate at Pentagon Blood Donor Center.
Pictured (Left to right): Navy Hospital Corpsman Third Class Castro, Peter Williams and Hospital Corpsman Third Class Nielsen. Castro and Nielsen present Williams a donor appreciation certificate at Pentagon Blood Donor Center.

Before working in the Pentagon, Williams donated to a civilian blood donor center. However, his volunteerism as a regular blood donor was put on pause when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. Williams would have to wait to give blood once his tests demonstrated that he was clear of cancer.

Then, one day while walking to lunch after starting his position at the Pentagon, Williams discovered the PBDC and learned that the military accepted blood from retirees. By then, Williams was cancer-free and determined to resume regular blood donation. It took a few months to provide the proper documentation that he was eligible to donate, but once he did, Williams became a regular supporter and donor to the PBDC.

Williams is especially fond of the PBDC because his donation experience has been personal, and he has developed a familiarity with the staff. He likened the relationships he’s established with them as baring similarity to that of “close co-workers”. Apart from taking the time to donate with PBDC, he has written the chain of command expressing his satisfaction with the donor experience there.

Williams said, “As a retiree, I may not be eligible to serve in uniform anymore, but I can sure serve my country as a consultant for the DoD and help service members and their families through blood donations.”

Williams’ donations and support were recognized during the May 2018 Armed Services Blood Bank Center Appreciation Event; he was issued his certificate of recognition by the Pentagon technician during his last blood donation with the PBDC. In the wake of 17 whole blood units, the PBDC bids “farewell and following seas” to a dedicated donor, Sailor, Vietnam veteran and retiree on his next adventure.

To become a blood donor, visit ASBP’s Where to Give Blood.

You also may be interested in...

First cold storage platelet unit collected in Southwest Asia

Article
9/15/2017
Air Force Staff Sgt. Jonathan Flannigan, NCO in charge of the apheresis element with the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group, monitors the Trima Accel Automated Blood Collection System machine used to obtain blood platelets from donors at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Apheresis element Airmen are tasked with collecting and storing platelet products and providing them for distribution throughout the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cynthia A. Innocenti)

It is likely that cold storage platelets, a method developed by the military, will eventually be the standard practice around the world for handling and shipping platelets

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program | Health Readiness | Innovation

Freeze-dried plasma saves life

Article
9/13/2017
Navy corpsmen apply first aid to a training manikin during a training exercise. Since December 2016, every MARSOC special amphibious reconnaissance corpsman deploys with a supply of freeze-dried plasma and the experience to administer it. By October 2017, every MARSOC unit deployed will be outfitted with FDP. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joshua Young)

Freeze-dried plasma is a dehydrated version of plasma that replaces the clotting factors lost in blood

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Services Blood Program

Military members are 'blood brothers and sisters' in more ways than one

Article
8/17/2017
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tenley Long)

Armed Services Blood Program sole provider of life’s essential liquid

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Armed Services Blood Program celebrates World Blood Donor Day

Article
6/13/2017
The Armed Services Blood Bank Center at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., received a new state-of-the-art blood mobile May 5.

Sponsored by the World Health Organization each year, World Blood Donor Day is celebrated June 14, and acknowledges the millions of men and women who roll up their sleeves to give blood

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Military blood program surges into the future

Article
5/23/2017
Army Sgt. Preston Campbell, donates for the low titer type O whole blood program at the Kendrick Memorial Blood Center on Fort Gordon, Georgia. (Courtesy photo)

The Ranger O Low Titer, or ROLO, program involves pre-screening service members prior to deployment to determine their suitability as a universal donor

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Military blood program conducts first blood drive at U.S. Senate

Article
4/4/2017
Annie Humphrey, Senate staff member, donates blood with the Armed Services Blood Program. Staff members from the Armed Services Blood Bank Center at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, traveled to Washington, D.C., for the blood drive. All blood collected during the drive directly supports ill or injured service members and their families worldwide. (Courtesy photo by Giovanni Rodriguez)

The Armed Services Blood Program traveled to the U.S. Senate for the first military blood drive on Capitol Hill

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Have a heart, become a donor

Article
2/15/2017
Air Force Senior Airman Hailey McFall, a fuels journeyman with the 182nd Logistics Readiness Squadron, Illinois Air National Guard, donates blood in Peoria, Ill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Lealan Buehrer)

Millions of people have signed up to be donors, but there is still a significant gap between what is donated and what is required to help another person

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Armed Services Blood Program celebrates National Blood Donor Month

Article
1/4/2017
ASBP Logo

Blood donors are the heart and soul of the military blood program’s mission to save lives

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Armed Services Blood Program

Photo
1/4/2017
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tenley Long)

Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tenley Long)

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Advances in the Use of Whole Blood for Combat Trauma Resuscitation

Presentation
6/2/2016

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program | Medical Research and Development

Armed Services Blood Program Research and Development Initiatives

Presentation
6/2/2016

Armed Services Blood Program-Research and Development Initiatives

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program | Medical Research and Development

Donor Self-deferral Information Sheet to Reduce the Risk of Transfusion-transmitted Zika

Publication
2/23/2016

This info sheet is to give to potential blood donors who have traveled to Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America in the last 28 days. BPL 16-02, Attachment 2

Recommended Content:

Zika Virus | Armed Services Blood Program

Post-donation Information Sheet

Publication
2/23/2016

This info sheet is to provide to blood donors after they give blood. BPL 16-02, Attachment 3

Recommended Content:

Zika Virus | Armed Services Blood Program

Guidance Regarding Zika Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses

Policy

This guidance contains information about the potential for transfusion-transmitted Zika infection; recommends facilitating donor self-deferral of 28 days after travel to Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America and South America.

AABB Association Bulletin #16-03

Publication
2/1/2016

This bulletin was developed by the AABB Transfusion-Transmitted Diseases (TTD) Committee in response to the ongoing outbreaks of Zika virus disease in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. BPL 16-02, Attachment 1

Recommended Content:

Zika Virus | Armed Services Blood Program
<< < 1 2 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 2

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.