Back to Top Skip to main content

Combat medics improve readiness with individual critical task list training

A group of combat medics unload a casualty from a MEDEVAC helicopter during a recent emergency medical evacuation training exercise at the hospital’s helipad here as part of the combat medic’s individual critical task list training. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal) A group of combat medics unload a casualty from a MEDEVAC helicopter during a recent emergency medical evacuation training exercise at the hospital’s helipad here as part of the combat medic’s individual critical task list training. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

FORT HOOD, Texas — Army Medical Command’s mantra to “sustain a medically ready force while maintain a ready medical force” may seem like a clever play on words, but Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center combat medics' recent readiness training attests to the fact that it's not just a statement; it is their mission.

More than 40 CRDAMC medics recently trained on emergency medical evacuation procedures at the hospital’s helipad here as part of the combat medic’s individual critical task list training. MEDCOM has identified more than 100 skills and tasks that a combat medic needs to become efficient in to provide high quality combat casualty care.

Army medics are typically assigned to work full time in various clinics or departments in medical treatment facilities, providing a different level of care at the garrison level than they would perform when they’re in a combat environment.

Some of their training tasks can be accomplished in the hospital setting, but most of the training tasks have to be conducted as separate events held off-site.

In an effort to give the medics more realistic training for the ICTLs, the senior training leaders at CRDAMC have developed different types of combat simulated exercises throughout the year.

This recent nine-line and MEDEVAC training exercise was the first for the medics at CRDAMC.

“It is important that the training be as realistic as possible. It's always best to have an actual running helicopter, with a live flight crew to interact with as that's how it's going to be done in real life,” said Army Sgt. 1st Class Johnathan Oakley, the noncommissioned officer in charge of the Department of Anesthesia and Operative Services, who helped run the training. “There is no substitution for being pushed around by the rotor wash of helicopter or for being able to accurately communicate over the deafening roar of the rotor.”

Oakley said they coordinated with a combat aviation unit for the cold and hot training portions of the exercise. They met at the hangar for a walk through of the training steps before conducting the live portion of the training which required the medics to call in a nine-line evacuation order, load and unload a casualty from the helicopter and perform immediate triage. The crew simulated real-world practices by communicating with the medics then lifting off and flying a short loop before landing and taking on another patient.

Training events like this are designed to get the medics’ mind to think along a different course, about a whole different skill set, according to Army Master Sgt. Joe Best, NCOIC to the Deputy Commander for Surgical Services who planned the training.

“When we can combine the experiences we get in the hospital with this type of training exercises, our readiness surely goes up,” said Best. “What we're doing here will pay dividends in the long run, not only for the medics, but for the Soldiers they serve. On the battlefield, we have only one chance to do it right.”

Best said he was pleased with the first iteration of the training as it can be difficult for medics to transition from the hospital clinic type of care mindset to one of a combat care environment. Some of the medics going through the training haven’t had any experience downrange and many of them need that exposure to the drills.

Army Staff Sgt. Kisha Lloyd-Perry, NCOIC of the Women's Health Center, said she enjoyed the training because it was a refresher for her as she’s been in garrison for a few years since her earlier deployments to Iraq.

“In that environment, it was risk of life on a daily basis from snipers to mortar attacks multiple times a day. As medics, we worked as first and second contacts to patients, so it was very educational and inspirational for me, to have so many Soldiers who depended on us for their lives,” Lloyd-Perry said. “That’s why this type of training is especially important for medics who have been assigned here as their first duty station. They need that exposure to providing care in a combat environment. I think it is vital that we [as medics] be familiar, competent, and efficient with our critical care skills and roles, especially since MEDCOM’s direction is that medics will be assigned to line units.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

The Defense Health Agency participates in AUSA 2019 annual meeting

Article
10/18/2019
U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, DHA Director, discusses upcoming Military Health System changes designed to improve the readiness of combat forces during a seminar held at the Association of the United States Army 2019 Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C.  Lt. Gen. Place explained how DHA is standardizing systems to improve healthcare across the enterprise.  (DHA Photo by Hannah Wagner)

Focus on quality care, innovation at home and on the battlefield

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Preventive Health

The Military Training Network transitions to the Defense Health Agency

Article
10/11/2019
The Military Training Network or MTN transferred from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences to the Defense Health Agency in September 2019. MTN oversees basic, advanced, and pediatric life-support training for more than 350,000 medical and non-medical personnel at 345 military facilities around the globe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexandra Singer)

Shift speeds training where it’s needed most

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

The Head, Hand, and Heart of Women’s Health

Article
10/4/2019
Maintaining peak health is critical for all military personnel. This month, we focus on women whose health concerns and symptoms may be different from those in men. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Roger Jackson)

Health is universal for military personnel and civilians, but some health concerns affect women differently. Here are a few examples.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Preventive Health | Women's Health

International medics tackle Tactical Combat Casualty Care

Article
9/23/2019
Air Force students provide cover while pulling a ‘wounded’ training mannequin out of simulated line-of-fire during the Tactical Combat Casualty Care course at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington. Battlefield simulation drills are vital to provide medics and combat personnel with realistic situations where they provide life-saving care and evacuation of wounded. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Lackey)

TCCC has become the new standard of medical training proficiency for military personnel

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Health Readiness

MSMR Vol. 26 No. 9 - September 2019

Report
9/1/2019

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Editorial: The Department of Defense/Veterans Affairs Vision Center of Excellence; Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to ocular and vision-related conditions, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018; Incidence and temporal presentation of visual dysfunction following diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2006–2017; Incidence and prevalence of selected refractive errors, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001–2018; Incident and recurrent cases of central serous chorioretinopathy, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001–2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

MSMR Vol. 26 No. 8 - August 2019

Report
8/1/2019

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Modeling Lyme disease host animal habitat suitability, West Point, New York; Incidence, timing, and seasonal patterns of heat illnesses during U.S. Army basic combat training, 2014–2018; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2014–2018; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003–2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Tick Facts: Dangers at the height of tick season

Article
7/31/2019
A tick like this one, seen at 10x magnification, can spread a number of dangerous pathogens during the warm-weather months. (Photo by Cornel Constantin)

Many diseases are transferred to humans by ticks — Lyme is the most common, but several others, described here, are worth knowing about

Recommended Content:

Bug-Borne Illnesses | Bug Week: July 27 - August 2 | Tick-Borne Illnesses | Health Readiness | Preventive Health | Public Health

U.S., Royal Air Force Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons train together

Article
7/26/2019
Reserve Citizen Airmen from Joint Base Charleston's 315th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron prepare a mock patient during a drill inside a C-17 Globemaster III, July 10, 2019. Drills performed while in-flight are to mimic real-life scenarios that the 315 AES may encounter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman William Brugge)

The C-17 Globemaster III serves as a common platform for medevacs in both squadrons

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

MSMR Vol. 26 No. 7 - July 2019

Report
7/1/2019

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Modeling Lyme disease host animal habitat suitability, West Point, New York; Incidence, timing, and seasonal patterns of heat illnesses during U.S. Army basic combat training, 2014–2018; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2014–2018; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003–2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Influenza

Infographic
7/1/2019
Adminstration of a seasonal flu vaccination. (U.S. Navy photo)

Adminstration of a seasonal flu vaccination. (U.S. Navy photo)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Mononucleosis

Infographic
7/1/2019
Mononucleosis

A specimen is tested for mononucleosis at the medical clinic on Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota (U.S. Air Force photo)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Zika

Infographic
7/1/2019
Zika

Anopheles merus mosquito. (CDC photo by James Gathany)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Psittacosis

Infographic
7/1/2019
Psittacosis

Green-winged Macaw. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Epidemiology and Analysis | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report | Public Health

Sexually transmitted infections on the rise in military

Article
6/26/2019
Some sexually transmitted infections are on the rise in the military. To increase awareness, members of Team McConnell attend a briefing on STIs at McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexi Myrick)

What you need to know to stay safe

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Men's Health | Women's Health

German allies visit JBSA-Fort Sam Houston on 75th anniversary of D-Day

Article
6/14/2019
Maj. Gen. Gesine Kruger, Commander for the German Bundeswehr Medical Academy (pictured center in the Flight Paramedic Training Simulator) and her delegation observed training and toured the Critical Care Flight Paramedic Course at the Health Readiness Center of Excellence. (U.S. Army photo)

The purpose of this visit was to further strengthen the bonds and interoperability programs between our allied countries or partner nations

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Health Readiness
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 39

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.