Back to Top Skip to main content

Langley surgical team goes 'purple'

A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled to perform an operation at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse and Army technician, the team performed a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Samuel Eckholm) A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled to perform an operation at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse and Army technician, the team performed a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Samuel Eckholm)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. — A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley to perform an operation. 

Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse, and Army technician, the team was organized to perform a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. 

“It’s always a great experience working with different branches in the operating room where we are able to learn from each other and share different perspectives,” said Army Spc. Travona Parker, Specialty Care Unit surgical technician.

Falling in line with the Tidewater enhanced Multi-Service Market, providing health care in a joint environment works to improve readiness by ensuring that health care providers have the capabilities they need while providing patients with convenient access to care. 

At the end of August 2018, Fort Eustis’ McDonald Army Health Center closed their operating room and joined the Navy in conducting surgical procedures at Hospital Langley. While operating room time has always been a hot commodity, having both the Army and Navy integrated into the Hospital Langley facility has maximized their utilization.

According to Air Force Maj. Erni Eulenstein, Surgical Operations Squadron Operating Room flight commander, “Allowing multiple services to operate at Langley has helped reduce the duplication of effort while also increasing efficiency.” If an operating room is not being used by the Air Force, it is often able to be filled by an Army or Navy surgeon to help increase utilization.

Of the surgical operations currently going on at Hospital Langley, roughly 68 percent are done by Langley providers, 28 percent are done by Fort Eustis providers, and the rest are done by Portsmouth providers. 

With different services coming together, challenges would be expected. However, besides a few scheduling issues, things have run smoothly. “Everyone seems to be integrating and working well together,” Eulenstein said.

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Dinchen Jardine, Navy Medical Center Portsmouth Department of Otolaryngology, served as the lead surgeon during the FESS procedure and appreciates the opportunity to utilize Hospital Langley’s facilities while working side-by-side with the Air Force and Army. “It definitely helps everyone see and understand best practices that then in turn can add to providing the best care possible for patients,” Jardine said.

Air Force Maj. Mandy Giffin, Surgical Operations Squadron operating room nurse, has served in all three branches, bringing a lot of experience into the OR. She enlisted in the Army before joining the Navy reserves as a surgical technician. She then joined the Air Force and went to nursing school where she now serves in an active duty component at Hospital Langley. 

Giffin believes there are many benefits to working as a joint surgical team. “You are able to hear what everyone’s different experiences are and you can compare them to how you do things yourself.” 

“We are definitely becoming very purple,” Giffin said, a term used to describe the blending of uniforms working together from different services. “It’s become so efficient that at this point, I don’t even think twice about it.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Medical team saves newborn’s life

Article
1/15/2019
Maria Ortiz, registered nurse, Labor and Delivery Section, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, checks vitals on Vanessa Torres, a laboring mom, as part of daily operations at WBAMC’s L&D section. Recently, Ortiz and other staff members quickly responded to an umbilical cord prolapse, an obstetrical emergency, at WBAMC resulting in the successful delivery of a baby, despite the life-threatening complication. (U.S. Army photo)

Staff quickly respond to the obstetrical emergency via an emergency cesarean section

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

'Fused' technologies give 3D view of prostate during biopsy

Article
1/9/2019
Eisenhower Army Medical Center graphic

Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men

Recommended Content:

Men's Health | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Preventive Health

CJTH continues to provide superior care for U.S., coalition forces

Article
1/7/2019
A medical team transports a patient by a stretcher to Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 10, 2018. Before entering the hospital, patients are thoroughly assessed, administratively in-processed and checked for any explosive ordnance or weapons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kaylee Dubois)

With a 99.3-percent survival rate, the hospital staff have reason to be proud

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Northstar Dustoff provides aeromedical evacuation in Kuwait

Article
1/4/2019
Army Soldiers assigned to the 2-211th General Support Aviation Battalion, Minnesota Army National Guard, and the 155th Armored Brigade Combat Team, Mississippi Army National Guard, pull a patient from a UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter during an aeromedical evacuation rehearsal at Camp Buehring, Kuwait. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Emily Finn)

Northstar Dustoff has completed more than 60 aeromedical evacuations since August 2018

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Army hospital earns reputation as a top teaching institution

Article
1/2/2019
Army OB/GYN nurse residents train in the CRDAMC simulation lab. The OB/GYN Nurse Resident Program, only offered at CRDAMC, focuses on OB/GYN nursing skills that include childbearing, high-risk and complicated pregnancy, newborn assessment and care and family planning gynecology. (U.S. Army photo by Gloria Montgomery)

CRDAMC has been recognized by healthcare associations and educational institutions for exceptional achievements

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Combat medics improve readiness with individual critical task list training

Article
12/31/2018
A group of combat medics unload a casualty from a MEDEVAC helicopter during a recent emergency medical evacuation training exercise at the hospital’s helipad here as part of the combat medic’s individual critical task list training. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal)

There is no substitution for being pushed around by the rotor wash of a helicopter

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

If the weather outside is frightful, a little preparation can make it delightful

Article
12/28/2018
Army 2nd Lt. David Stringer, 452nd Combat Support Hospital, leads his group through snowy terrain during winter warfare training at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Felix R. Fimbres)

Learn the risks of exposure to cold, and steps to stay safe

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Navy corpsman: Carrying the legacy

Article
12/27/2018
Navy Seaman Brandon Taylor, a corpsman, inserts a decompression needle into an essential care simulator manikin during shock trauma section drills. The drills focused on sharpening life-saving skills and capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Justin Huffty)

Navy hospital corpsmen attend 14-week “A” school at the Medical Education and Training Campus in Joint Base San Antonio — Fort Sam Houston, Texas

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Oak Harbor achieves first with crucial new information technology milestone

Article
12/21/2018
Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor seal

Reducing risks to patients’ information is a top priority for the DoD

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Research and Innovation

Hospital ship USNS Comfort returns home after completing mission

Article
12/20/2018
Family and friends of crew members aboard Military Sealift Command’s hospital ship USNS Comfort wait as the ship pulls into Naval Station Norfolk, Dec. 18. Comfort returned to Virginia after completing its 11-week medical support mission to South and Central America, part of U.S. Southern Command’s Operation Enduring Promise initiative. (U.S. Navy photograph by Brian Suriani)

This mission marked the sixth time the hospital ship has provided medical assistance in the region

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Global Health Engagement

Super Galaxy: Aeromedical evacuation's biggest ally

Article
12/17/2018
Air Force Aeromedical Teams from the 433rd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron and the 439th AES complete a training scenario during a C-5M Super Galaxy AE proof of concept flight from Scott AFB, Illinois. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Joseph Swafford)

The C-5M upgrades allowed the proof of concept to work, but Airmen’s innovation is what made it happen

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Surgeons share secrets of residency success

Article
12/11/2018
Surgeons in the operating room at Madigan Army Medical Center. (U.S. Army photo by John Wayne Liston)

Madigan's general surgery residents have passed the exam for board certification on their first attempt at a nation-topping rate of 97.6 percent

Recommended Content:

Access, Cost, Quality, and Safety | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Vaccination is the best defense against the flu

Article
12/10/2018
Vaccination is the primary method for preventing influenza and its complications and getting an annual influenza vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and your family from the flu. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Erica Knight)

Vaccination is needed every year because the Influenza viruses change

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Immunization Healthcare | Immunizations

Fleet surgical team saves life aboard USS Somerset

Article
12/6/2018
Navy Cmdr. Jeffrey Chao, the Littoral Combat Group One, surgeon, second from left, performs an emergency appendectomy as other medical team members assist aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Andrew Brame)

We were able to determine he had acute appendicitis

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

New training mannequins help Soldiers save lives

Article
11/28/2018
Soldiers at Fort Benning, Georgia, train one another on using the Tactical Combat Casualty Care Exportable system, a medical trauma training mannequin. Personnel from the office of the Program Executive Officer for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation, brought new, technologically advanced medical training mannequins to Fort Benning to increase the realism of medical trauma training and ultimately to save lives and limbs. (U.S. Army photo by Patrick Albright)

The realism of it creates that white-knuckle sensation and adrenalin for the Soldier

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 41

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing.. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.