Back to Top Skip to main content

Langley surgical team goes 'purple'

A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled to perform an operation at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse and Army technician, the team performed a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Samuel Eckholm) A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled to perform an operation at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse and Army technician, the team performed a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Samuel Eckholm)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. — A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley to perform an operation. 

Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse, and Army technician, the team was organized to perform a Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. 

“It’s always a great experience working with different branches in the operating room where we are able to learn from each other and share different perspectives,” said Army Spc. Travona Parker, Specialty Care Unit surgical technician.

Falling in line with the Tidewater enhanced Multi-Service Market, providing health care in a joint environment works to improve readiness by ensuring that health care providers have the capabilities they need while providing patients with convenient access to care. 

At the end of August 2018, Fort Eustis’ McDonald Army Health Center closed their operating room and joined the Navy in conducting surgical procedures at Hospital Langley. While operating room time has always been a hot commodity, having both the Army and Navy integrated into the Hospital Langley facility has maximized their utilization.

According to Air Force Maj. Erni Eulenstein, Surgical Operations Squadron Operating Room flight commander, “Allowing multiple services to operate at Langley has helped reduce the duplication of effort while also increasing efficiency.” If an operating room is not being used by the Air Force, it is often able to be filled by an Army or Navy surgeon to help increase utilization.

Of the surgical operations currently going on at Hospital Langley, roughly 68 percent are done by Langley providers, 28 percent are done by Fort Eustis providers, and the rest are done by Portsmouth providers. 

With different services coming together, challenges would be expected. However, besides a few scheduling issues, things have run smoothly. “Everyone seems to be integrating and working well together,” Eulenstein said.

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Dinchen Jardine, Navy Medical Center Portsmouth Department of Otolaryngology, served as the lead surgeon during the FESS procedure and appreciates the opportunity to utilize Hospital Langley’s facilities while working side-by-side with the Air Force and Army. “It definitely helps everyone see and understand best practices that then in turn can add to providing the best care possible for patients,” Jardine said.

Air Force Maj. Mandy Giffin, Surgical Operations Squadron operating room nurse, has served in all three branches, bringing a lot of experience into the OR. She enlisted in the Army before joining the Navy reserves as a surgical technician. She then joined the Air Force and went to nursing school where she now serves in an active duty component at Hospital Langley. 

Giffin believes there are many benefits to working as a joint surgical team. “You are able to hear what everyone’s different experiences are and you can compare them to how you do things yourself.” 

“We are definitely becoming very purple,” Giffin said, a term used to describe the blending of uniforms working together from different services. “It’s become so efficient that at this point, I don’t even think twice about it.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Survey indicates higher satisfaction with military medical facilities

Article
1/8/2018
Staff at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington, treat patients. The 2017 results of the Defense Department’s Joint Outpatient Experience Survey show an increase in patient satisfaction with military medical facilities and pharmacy care. (U.S. Army photo)

The results of the survey show an overall increase in satisfaction

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Access to Health Care | MHS Patient Satisfaction Surveys | MHS Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Information (for Patients)

Deployed Airman provides critical care anywhere

Article
1/5/2018
Air Force Capt. Asha Wyatt, 455th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron aeromedical evacuation operations officer and flight nurse, poses for a photo at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Dec. 28, 2017. Wyatt is deployed from Pope Army Airfield, N.C., and has been in the Air Force for six years. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Divine Cox

When injured airmen need to be transported, the 455th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron’s airmen provide patients with lifesaving emergency and prehospital care

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement

Maintenance key to medical device precision, accuracy

Article
1/4/2018
A technician assigned to the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency's Medical Maintenance Operations Division-Tracy works on a piece of equipment in the depot's special purpose test, measurement and diagnostics equipment lab. (U.S. Army photo by Ellen Crown)

It's not about the item we touch, it's about the patient that uses it

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness

Elective surgeries hone surgical skills, prepare medical team for combat

Article
12/7/2017
Inside Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s second floor surgery suite, surgeons and medical teams are busy honing their critical-care skills. Regardless of procedure or patient, every incision is an exercise in mission readiness. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

Regardless of procedure or patient, every incision is an exercise in mission readiness

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Health Readiness

WBAMC pharmacist catches serious drug interaction

Article
11/27/2017
Dr. Anna Jewula, pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, is recognized for her attentiveness in assisting a patient with a prescription order that contraindicated a previous prescription medication, avoiding a potentially serious drug interaction detrimental to the patient’s health (U.S. Army photo Marcy Sanchez)

Thanks to a pharmacist’s careful eye, one patient avoided a potentially deadly drug interaction

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | TRICARE Pharmacy Program

Trauma chief praises medical response to Sutherland Springs shooting

Article
11/16/2017
As a Level I trauma center, Brooke Army Medical Center at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, received patients from the Nov. 5, 2017, mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (U.S. Army file photo)

BAMC received eight victims – six adults and two minors – from the Nov. 5 mass shooting in the small community church in Sutherland Springs

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Military Hospitals and Clinics | San Antonio

Burn Center offers new pain management approach for patients

Article
11/8/2017
Pain medication is managed with the placement of an intrathecal catheter exactly like an epidural catheter used for laboring women, except that the catheter resides in the intrathecal space where the cerebrospinal fluid resides instead of the epidural space. (Courtesy photo)

The pain medication is managed with the placement of an intrathecal catheter and infusion of preservative-free morphine

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Pain Management

Online patient portal saves time, improves access to medical information

Article
10/30/2017
The TRICARE Online Patient Portal connects registered users with online health care information and services at military hospitals and clinics.

Patients who can more easily access their own health information using TRICARE Online are more inclined to use the health benefit

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | TRICARE Health Program | MHS Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Information (for Patients)

Keeping surgical instruments sterile, safe

Article
10/24/2017
The first line of defense in combating patient infections for a hospital is its Central Services. Sterile processing technicians sterilize and decontaminate reusable surgical and clinical instruments in adherence to standards and recommended practices prioritizing patient safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)

Sterile processing technicians sterilize and decontaminate reusable surgical and clinical instruments in adherence to standards and recommended practices prioritizing patient safety

Recommended Content:

Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Department of Defense continues commitment to Global Health Security Agenda

Article
10/12/2016
Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, addressed attendees on the second day of the 2016 Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Summit Sept. 14, 2016.

Department of Defense and other senior U.S. government leaders travel to the Netherlands to attend a summit on the Global Health Security Agenda

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability | Global Health Security Agenda | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 > >> 
Showing results 121 - 130 Page 9 of 9

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.