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Hospital Corpsmen graduate from trauma training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville

Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Kyle Hamlin, an instructor for the hospital corpsman trauma training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, helps motivate sailors during a Tactical Combat Casualty Care course. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel) Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Kyle Hamlin, an instructor for the hospital corpsman trauma training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, helps motivate sailors during a Tactical Combat Casualty Care course. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel)

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Sixteen hospital corpsmen from across the Navy graduated from Navy Medicine’s Hospital Corpsman Trauma Training program on March 29 at Naval Hospital Jacksonville.  This is the first evolution at NH Jacksonville, and the Navy’s second site to host the program.

The corpsmen received two weeks of training at NH Jacksonville (including simulation labs and a Tactical Combat Casualty Care course), followed by five weeks at UF Health Jacksonville (a Level I trauma center), with rotations in the emergency department, trauma resuscitation, intensive care unit, rapid response team, and wound management.

The corpsmen, who have already served one tour at a military treatment facility (after completing Navy Hospital Corps “A” School), will serve next with an operational unit, including Marine Corps units and ships.

The program provides enhanced real-world trauma experience for Navy hospital corpsmen, who provide life-saving care to sailors and Marines in the field.

“Our innovative partnerships with private-sector health systems enable us to maintain the advanced life-saving skills of multiple types of military clinicians,” said Navy Capt. Matthew Case, commander, NH Jacksonville and commanding officer, Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville.  “With this program, we’re able to strengthen hospital corpsmen assigned to operational commanders across the Navy and Marine Corps, to save lives at sea, in the air, and on land.”

Sixteen hospital corpsmen from across the Navy graduated from Navy Medicine’s Hospital Corpsman Trauma Training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. This is the first evolution at NH Jacksonville, and the Navy’s second site to host the program. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville)
Sixteen hospital corpsmen from across the Navy graduated from Navy Medicine’s Hospital Corpsman Trauma Training program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. This is the first evolution at NH Jacksonville, and the Navy’s second site to host the program. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville)

This program is one aspect of NH Jacksonville’s partnerships, which currently include St. Vincent’s HealthCare and UF Health.  Other partnerships are in development.

“My expectation is that this program will prepare me to handle trauma care experiences I might face when deploying with my next command, 2nd Marine Division, 8th Regiment at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune,” said Navy Hospitalman Triston Ulrich at the outset.  At the conclusion of training, he summarized by saying, “I got to see things that I hadn’t, but will on the battlefield.  UF Health Jacksonville staff were outstanding, using teamwork in an extremely busy environment to meet the health goals.”

“I will remember this program for the rest of my Navy career.  It gave me the opportunity to see real-world trauma and hone my skills,” observed Navy Hospitalman Jonathan Cordova, who is heading to 2nd Marine Division, 2nd Regiment at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune.  “I joined the Navy to be part of something greater than myself, and do my part for my country.  I read about Navy hospital corpsmen and their achievements on the battlefield.  I joined to be a part of the brotherhood and one day put my skills to the test and help save lives.”

The Hospital Corpsman Trauma Training program furthers the Navy surgeon general’s goal to achieve maximum future life-saving capabilities and survivability along the continuum of care.

The training partnership includes Navy Medicine, NH Jacksonville and NMRTC Jacksonville, and UF Health.

“You’re the best of the best.  It’s an honor and a privilege to be part of this program,” said Ashley NorseUF Health Jacksonville’s medical director for emergency medicine, speaking to the graduating hospital corpsmen.  “We relish our partnership with Naval Hospital Jacksonville.”

“This is an excellent learning opportunity for our staff as well as the hospital corpsmen,” noted Mara Hernandez, a registered nurse at UF Health Jacksonville’s emergency department.  “The Navy corpsmen are eager to learn in our busy Level I trauma center, and they mastered technical life-saving skills, while our staff learned a new form of interdisciplinary cooperation.”

The first site to host this Navy Medicine program, launched in fall 2017, was Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center (located in North Chicago, near Naval Training Center Great Lakes) and John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County (located in Chicago, Illinois).  Naval Hospital Jacksonville will host its second cohort from July 1 to Aug. 30.

Navy Medicine Readiness and Training CommandJacksonville (co-located with Naval Hospital Jacksonville) ensures warfighters’ medical readiness to deploy and clinicians’ readiness to save lives.  NH Jacksonville and NMRTC Jacksonville deliver quality health care, in an integrated system of readiness and health.  NH Jacksonville includes five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia.  It serves 163,000 active-duty and retired sailors, Marines, soldiers, airmen, guardsmen, and their families, including about 83,000 patients who are enrolled with a primary care manager.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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