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AFMES celebrates lab week

The purpose of lab week is to increase public awareness of the importance of laboratory professionals and their role in clinical diagnostics and medicine. The exceptional efforts and behind-the-scenes work of laboratories is essential to protecting public health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Nicole Leidholm) The purpose of lab week is to increase public awareness of the importance of laboratory professionals and their role in clinical diagnostics and medicine. The exceptional efforts and behind-the-scenes work of laboratories is essential to protecting public health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Nicole Leidholm)

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Armed Forces Medical Examiner System

DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. — The Armed Forces Medical Examiner System celebrated lab week with a series of laboratory-themed events, April 22-26.

According to the Center for Diseases Control and Prevention, the purpose of this annual event is to increase public awareness of the importance of laboratory professionals and their role in clinical diagnostics and medicine. The exceptional efforts and behind-the-scenes work of laboratories is essential to protecting public health.

The first Lab Week was organized in 1975 by the American Society for Medical Technology, now known as the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science. Sixteen representatives from various organizations coordinated the efforts to celebrate laboratory professionals.

“AFMES celebrated its Lab Week by embracing science and our lab techs,” Navy Lt. Ken Lindsay, AFMES chief of Military Working Dog laboratory, who also led in the planning effort. “We setup events throughout the week to break up the day-to-day grind.”

AFMES held carnival type events, scavenger hunts, and word searches throughout the week including a presentation by Dover Air Force Base’s military working dogs with a patrol and search demonstration.

“Watching the dog demonstration was awesome,” said Jenna Patterson, AFMES Repository deputy supervisor. “I am actually afraid of dogs, but seeing them work and follow commands, I felt very safe.”

Additionally, The DNA lab presented informational posters and videos, which explain how AFMES uses DNA technology to aid in the identification of missing service members. During the presentation, food was provided in the form of a baking contest with different DNA or Lab Week-related themes.

“We were looking for ways to share and inform our colleagues’ different parts of the AFMES mission,” said Lindsay. “It’s sometimes hard for us to get everyone together and explain what each section does, but this week made that possible.”

Lastly, the week culminated with the 2nd Annual Lab Coat Fashion Show, where participants designed and modeled their take on a fashionable lab coat.

“Sections of AMFES get really excited for this event,” said Lindsay. “We have people that like to design and showoff their catwalk skills.”

Lindsay said that the event was a huge success and that Team AFMES is looking forward to the event next year.

“It was a great moral boost,” said Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Derrick McCullum, AFMES administration officer. “It was an amazing way to celebrate our lab techs and bring everyone together.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity.  Read original post.

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