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MHS GENESIS discussed at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michelle Rootes (center), 673d Medical Group superintendent, and U.S. Air Force Col. Mark Lamey (right), 673d MDG deputy commander, welcome U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019. Payne visited JBER to discuss upcoming changes to MHS and what that means for patients and providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jonathan Valdes Montijo) Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michelle Rootes (center), 673d Medical Group superintendent, and U.S. Air Force Col. Mark Lamey (right), 673d MDG deputy commander, welcome U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019. Payne visited JBER to discuss upcoming changes to MHS and what that means for patients and providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jonathan Valdes Montijo)

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JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, the Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, visited Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019.

Payne highlighted the new electronic health record MHS GENESIS and what some of the changes associated with it will be.

One of the missions of the MHS is to ensure America’s 1.4 million active duty and 331,000 reserve-component personnel are healthy so they can complete their national security mission.

Some of the benefits include:

  • Faster and better management of chronic, complex, and time-sensitive conditions
  • Automated, real-time clinical decision support for doctors and care providers
  • Increased patient engagement capabilities that allow patients to directly communicate with their providers
  • Lower overall maintenance costs for legacy systems
  • Full compliance with the Department of Defense’s cybersecurity requirements

As the functional champion, Payne mentioned he is the community’s link to the new program’s office and Defense Health Agency.

“I have listened to all of you about quality, safety and the problems the record system has,” said Payne. “We have a team at the DHA that manages the record on a day-to-day basis, and is working every day to improve the interface with providers and patients.”

The new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, integrates all aspects of care and is integral in provision and coordination of safe, quality care. It connects medical and dental information across the continuum of care, whether on the battlefield or at home in the military hospital.

In addition, it empowers the military health enterprise, enabling the MHS to be a high-reliability organization. With the deployment of MHS GENESIS, many changes will be experienced by the provider and beneficiary audiences, as the MHS becomes a more integrated system of health and readiness.

Payne emphasized MHS GENESIS, which is scheduled to roll out September 2020, will have its challenges.

“We are here to tell you about the beginnings and complexities of this journey, what we need to do collectively, and what you all need to do specifically,” Payne said. “We all need to pay attention to this process in order to be as successful as possible.”

He also expressed his desires and expectations for MHS GENESIS, and encouraged everyone to approach it with a positive attitude.

“My intent is to make you excited about MHS GENESIS,” said Payne. “I think it’s going to bring us more capabilities, deliver safer health care, and push us into the future with our partnership with Veterans Affairs. Get excited about this, help your people get excited about it, and let’s make this as successful as possible.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

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