Back to Top Skip to main content

MHS GENESIS discussed at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson

Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michelle Rootes (center), 673d Medical Group superintendent, and U.S. Air Force Col. Mark Lamey (right), 673d MDG deputy commander, welcome U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019. Payne visited JBER to discuss upcoming changes to MHS and what that means for patients and providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jonathan Valdes Montijo) Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michelle Rootes (center), 673d Medical Group superintendent, and U.S. Air Force Col. Mark Lamey (right), 673d MDG deputy commander, welcome U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019. Payne visited JBER to discuss upcoming changes to MHS and what that means for patients and providers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jonathan Valdes Montijo)

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | Military Hospitals and Clinics

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, the Defense Health Agency Assistant Director for Combat Support, and Military Health System Electronic Health Record Functional Champion, visited Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, July 9, 2019.

Payne highlighted the new electronic health record MHS GENESIS and what some of the changes associated with it will be.

One of the missions of the MHS is to ensure America’s 1.4 million active duty and 331,000 reserve-component personnel are healthy so they can complete their national security mission.

Some of the benefits include:

  • Faster and better management of chronic, complex, and time-sensitive conditions
  • Automated, real-time clinical decision support for doctors and care providers
  • Increased patient engagement capabilities that allow patients to directly communicate with their providers
  • Lower overall maintenance costs for legacy systems
  • Full compliance with the Department of Defense’s cybersecurity requirements

As the functional champion, Payne mentioned he is the community’s link to the new program’s office and Defense Health Agency.

“I have listened to all of you about quality, safety and the problems the record system has,” said Payne. “We have a team at the DHA that manages the record on a day-to-day basis, and is working every day to improve the interface with providers and patients.”

The new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, integrates all aspects of care and is integral in provision and coordination of safe, quality care. It connects medical and dental information across the continuum of care, whether on the battlefield or at home in the military hospital.

In addition, it empowers the military health enterprise, enabling the MHS to be a high-reliability organization. With the deployment of MHS GENESIS, many changes will be experienced by the provider and beneficiary audiences, as the MHS becomes a more integrated system of health and readiness.

Payne emphasized MHS GENESIS, which is scheduled to roll out September 2020, will have its challenges.

“We are here to tell you about the beginnings and complexities of this journey, what we need to do collectively, and what you all need to do specifically,” Payne said. “We all need to pay attention to this process in order to be as successful as possible.”

He also expressed his desires and expectations for MHS GENESIS, and encouraged everyone to approach it with a positive attitude.

“My intent is to make you excited about MHS GENESIS,” said Payne. “I think it’s going to bring us more capabilities, deliver safer health care, and push us into the future with our partnership with Veterans Affairs. Get excited about this, help your people get excited about it, and let’s make this as successful as possible.”

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Military health: All for one, one for all

Article
12/1/2017
From left, Retired Army Maj. Gen. Richard Thomas, president of Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences;  Navy Rear Adm. Colin Chinn, Joint Staff surgeon; Air Force Lt. Gen. Mark Ediger, Air Force surgeon general; Navy Vice Adm. Forrest Faison III, Navy surgeon general; Army Maj. Gen. Ronald Place, for the Army surgeon general; Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director of the Defense Health Agency; and Tom McCaffery, acting assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. (Courtesy photo)

Joint interoperability is theme of leadership session

Recommended Content:

MHS GENESIS | TRICARE Health Program

WBAMC pharmacist catches serious drug interaction

Article
11/27/2017
Dr. Anna Jewula, pharmacist, Department of Pharmacy, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, is recognized for her attentiveness in assisting a patient with a prescription order that contraindicated a previous prescription medication, avoiding a potentially serious drug interaction detrimental to the patient’s health (U.S. Army photo Marcy Sanchez)

Thanks to a pharmacist’s careful eye, one patient avoided a potentially deadly drug interaction

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | TRICARE Pharmacy Program

Trauma chief praises medical response to Sutherland Springs shooting

Article
11/16/2017
As a Level I trauma center, Brooke Army Medical Center at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, received patients from the Nov. 5, 2017, mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. (U.S. Army file photo)

BAMC received eight victims – six adults and two minors – from the Nov. 5 mass shooting in the small community church in Sutherland Springs

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Military Hospitals and Clinics | San Antonio

MHS GENESIS deployed in Pacific Northwest

Article
11/16/2017
Commanding officers of the military treatment facilities involved in the initial deployment of MHS GENESIS, the Department of Defense's new electronic health record pose for a commemorative photo with senior leadership during the MHS GENESIS Recognition Ceremony Nov. 15 at Madigan Army Medical Center. The Pacific Northwest was selected as the initial deployment site for the new EHR, which has now been fielded at Fairchild Air Force Base, Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor, Naval Hospital Bremerton and Madigan Army Medical Center. Pictured from left, Army Col. Michael Place, commander, Madigan Army Medical Center; Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, director, Defense Health Agency; Air Force Col. Michaelle Guerrero, 92nd Medical Group at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington; Stacy Cummings, program executive officer, Defense Healthcare Management System; Navy Capt. Jeffrey Bitterman, commanding officer, Naval Hospital Bremerton; Navy Capt. Christine Sears, commanding officer, Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor; and Thomas McCaffery, acting assistant secretary of defense for Health Affairs. (U.S. Army photo by Flavia Hulsey)

The Pacific Northwest was selected as the initial deployment site for the new EHR

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Electronic Health Record | MHS GENESIS

Burn Center offers new pain management approach for patients

Article
11/8/2017
Pain medication is managed with the placement of an intrathecal catheter exactly like an epidural catheter used for laboring women, except that the catheter resides in the intrathecal space where the cerebrospinal fluid resides instead of the epidural space. (Courtesy photo)

The pain medication is managed with the placement of an intrathecal catheter and infusion of preservative-free morphine

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Pain Management

Online patient portal saves time, improves access to medical information

Article
10/30/2017
The TRICARE Online Patient Portal connects registered users with online health care information and services at military hospitals and clinics.

Patients who can more easily access their own health information using TRICARE Online are more inclined to use the health benefit

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | TRICARE Health Program | MHS Quality, Patient Safety, and Access Information (for Patients)

Keeping surgical instruments sterile, safe

Article
10/24/2017
The first line of defense in combating patient infections for a hospital is its Central Services. Sterile processing technicians sterilize and decontaminate reusable surgical and clinical instruments in adherence to standards and recommended practices prioritizing patient safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)

Sterile processing technicians sterilize and decontaminate reusable surgical and clinical instruments in adherence to standards and recommended practices prioritizing patient safety

Recommended Content:

Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < ... 6 7 > >> 
Showing results 91 - 97 Page 7 of 7

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.