Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Health agencies investigating severe lung illnesses linked to e-cigarette use

"While the CDC investigation of the possible cases of lung illness and deaths reportedly associated with the use of e-cigarette products is ongoing, Service members and their families or dependents are encouraged not to use e-cigarette products,” advised Dr. Terry Adirim, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Health Services Policy and Oversight. (DoD photo) "While the CDC investigation of the possible cases of lung illness and deaths reportedly associated with the use of e-cigarette products is ongoing, Service members and their families or dependents are encouraged not to use e-cigarette products,” advised Dr. Terry Adirim, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Health Services Policy and Oversight. (DoD photo)

Recommended Content:

Tobacco-Free Living | Substance Abuse | Public Health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working with the Food and Drug Administration, state and local health departments, and other public health partners to investigate a multistate outbreak of severe lung illnesses linked to e-cigarette use.

As of Sept. 6, the CDC said, 33 states as well as the U.S. Virgin Islands have reported more than 450 possible cases of lung illnesses associated with using e-cigarette products. Six deaths have been confirmed in California, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, and Oregon.

The products under investigation include devices, liquids, refill pods, and cartridges. A cause has not yet been identified, the CDC says, but all reported cases have a history of using e-cigarette products.

The CDC said the investigation so far has not identified a specific substance or e-cigarette product that is linked to all cases. Many patients report using e-cigarette products with liquids that contain cannabinoid products such as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.

The CDC recommends that people consider not using e-cigarette products while the investigation is ongoing. Those who do use these products should seek prompt medical care if they experience symptoms including coughing, shortness of breath, or chest pain; nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; or fatigue, fever, or weight loss.

Some patients reported that their symptoms developed anywhere from over a few days to over several weeks, the CDC said.

Regardless of the investigation, the CDC warns that pregnant women, youth, and young adults should not use e-cigarette products. Adults who do use these products should not buy them off the street, nor modify them with substances not intended by the manufacturer.

"While the CDC investigation of the possible cases of lung illness and deaths reportedly associated with the use of e-cigarette products is ongoing, Service members and their families or dependents are encouraged not to use e-cigarette products,” advised Dr. Terry Adirim, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Health Services Policy and Oversight. “Current users of e-cigarettes are encouraged to report any symptoms like those reported in this outbreak including cough, shortness of breath, chest pain nausea, vomiting, diarrhea fatigue, fever, or weight loss and seek medical care promptly."

E-cigarette use sometimes is called vaping. As the CDC explains, the products are also known as e-cigs, vapes, e-hookahs, vape pens, and ENDS (electronic nicotine delivery systems).

E-cigarettes come in different shapes and sizes. Some may look like regular cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Others look like everyday items such as pens and flash drives.

Most have a battery heating element, and a place to hold a liquid. E-cigarettes produce an aerosol by heating a liquid that usually contains nicotine – the addictive drug in regular cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products – flavorings, and other chemicals. Users inhale this aerosol into their lungs. Bystanders can also breathe in this aerosol when the user exhales into the air.

The Military Health System offers information on the health risks of tobacco use as well as resources for how to stop using it or avoid starting.

You also may be interested in...

Immunization Awareness Pneumococcal Vaccines and Smokers

Infographic
7/21/2021
Immunization Awareness - Pneumococcal Vaccines and Smokers

Immunization Awareness - Pneumococcal Vaccines and Smokers

Recommended Content:

August Toolkit | Immunization Awareness Month | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Immunizations | Tobacco-Free Living

DHA Spearheads Effort for Working Dog Research Collaboration

Article
6/25/2021
Picture of three different dogs

Working Dog Forum explored research to keep dogs in top form.

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Veterinary Service | Public Health | Research and Innovation

Avoiding Substance Misuse as a Coping Mechanism

Video
6/23/2021

Military life is rewarding, yet often stressful. Learn five options to help you find healthy ways to cope with stress.

Recommended Content:

Substance Abuse | Psychological Fitness | Real Warriors Campaign

Know the Signs: Preventing Prescription Misuse

Video
6/23/2021

Prescription drug misuse can lead to challenges staying psychologically and physically fit. Learn the warning signs of prescription drug misuse to stay mission ready.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness | Substance Abuse | Real Warriors Campaign

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 05 - May 2021

Report
5/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Hospitalizations, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Ambulatory visits, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Surveillance snapshot: Illness and injury burdens, reserve component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Surveillance snapshot: Illness and injury burdens, recruit trainees, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Medical evacuations out of the U.S. Central Command, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, deployed active and reserve component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, non-service member beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2020.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

World No Tobacco Day Collage

Infographic
4/26/2021
Social media graphic for World No Tobacco Day, showing a fist stamping out a cigarette overlaid on a map of the Earth

“World No Tobacco Day”

Recommended Content:

May | Tobacco-Free Living

Public health remains an integral part in the fight against COVID

Article
4/9/2021
Infographic featuring health personnel wearing face shields and mask with "National Public Health Week" across the top of the picture

The pandemic has highlighted a need to provide more advanced training on infection prevention and control.

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness & Prevention Toolkit | Public Health | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 04 - April 2021

Report
4/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Disparities in COVID-19 vaccine initiation and completion among active component service members and healthcare personnel, 11 December 2020–12 March 2021; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005–2020; Skin and soft tissue infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, January 2016–September 2020.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Alcohol Awareness v1

Infographic
3/23/2021
Alcohol Awareness Month social media graphic featuring a black background with a white fold in the left corner an animated man in a suit walking along the base of a teal bottle lying on its side

Alcohol Awareness Month social media graphic featuring a black background with a white fold in the left corner and an animated man in a suit walking along the base of a teal bottle lying on its side

Recommended Content:

April | Substance Abuse

New Army surveillance program designed to keep service members safe

Article
3/10/2021
Military personnel wearing a face mask hanging a light in a tree

Collecting vector samples allows for PHC-P scientists to analyze areas of interest for potential vector-borne diseases that could impact the health of the force.

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Global Health Engagement | Bug-Borne Illnesses | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 03 - March 2021

Report
3/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Influenza surveillance trends and influenza vaccine effectiveness among Department of Defense beneficiaries during the 2019–2020 influenza season; Influenza outbreak during Exercise Talisman Sabre, Queensland, Australia, July 2019; Update: Sexually transmitted infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012–2020; A retrospective cohort study of blood lead levels among special operations forces soldiers exposed to lead at a firing range in Germany.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 02 - February 2021

Report
2/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Update: Malaria, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Historical perspective: The evolution of post-exposure prophylaxis for vivax malaria since the Korean War; Surveillance for vector-borne diseases among active and reserve component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

MHS looks to decrease substance abuse, as numbers rose in 2020

Article
1/22/2021
Shadowed image of person sitting at a desk with their head down

Alcohol use remains high in the military, but treatment for substance abuse is evolving.

Recommended Content:

Substance Abuse

COVID-19 hinders blood donations during National Blood Donor Month

Article
1/14/2021
Navy Capt. R. Wade Blizzard, commanding officer of U.S. Navy Support Facility Diego Garcia, donates blood for the Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Units Diego Garcia walking blood bank on Dec. 17, 2020. The walking blood bank is a list of eligible donors who can provide blood in case of emergency. (U.S. Navy photo by Navy Seaman Apprentice Stevin Atkins)

Life-saving blood is in high-demand by the Armed Services Blood Program, as the COVID-19 has negatively impacted donations.

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program | Public Health | Coronavirus | Total Force Fitness Toolkit

DOD Launches “My MilLife Guide” Text Message Program to Boost Wellness

Article
1/11/2021
The new My MilLife Guide program supports the wellness of the military community.

DoD has launched My MilLife Guide, a new program that sends text messages designed to help the military community boost overall wellness while navigating stresses related to COVID-19.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Public Health | Total Force Fitness | Health Readiness
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 29

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.